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BUYING TONIGHT!! Final Thoughts!

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August 29, 2009 9:04:44 PM

Cooler Master 690
i7 920
ASUS P6T SE LGA 1366
OCZ XMP Ready Series 6GB DDR3 1600 (8-8-8-24)
Samsung Spinpoint 1TB
XFX Radeon 4890
ASUS VH226H 21.5" 2MS (GTG)
Corsair 750TX
Sony Optiarc 24X DVD/CD RW Black Burner
Logitech S-220 2.1 Speakers
Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard and Mouse
Sunbeam Core-Contact Freezer CPU Cooler
Sunbeam Socket Retention Bracket Set

FREE: OCZ Diesel 4GB USB Flash Drive

TOTAL: $1800.94 CDN

This is my first PC build so I want any final thoughts before I order tonight. If something is not right or not going to work then I would love to know. Any final combo deals or suggestions to save me money on the same build would be awesome but I would prefer to buy everything from newegg.ca to keep it simple.

Lastly, any sites/guides on how to build a PC? I have already done some good amount of looking through guides but if you have any to suggest that are really good than that'd be cool. Also I found guides for overclocking the i7 920 and the radeon 4890 but can I overclock anything else on this computer and where can I find information on this? THANKS!
August 29, 2009 9:31:28 PM

Very nice. If you aren't confident in your build, feel free to look through other threads about i7 builds, most of them are pretty similar.

Heres a few really quick tips about building your own PC (there are tons of ways to do it but this is how I go about it)

-Put your HDD and DVD Drive in the case first. Then you kinda put the motherboard in, and plug in everything where it fits.

-Read the motherboard manual, or at least look at the quick set up sheet if it ships with one.

-Take your time, it's better to take 10 minutes longer than it is to break something and wait for a new part to get shipped.

-It's really not as hard as it sounds, "building a computer" can sound intimidating, but its really just putting a lot of parts together

-Have fun!! ^_^


Edit: Dude you get a free 4GB flash drive!!!! :D 
August 29, 2009 9:34:02 PM

Thanks man, I've looked at tons of these threads so I'm really confident in this build. A little expensive for me but I don't want anything less than my great expectations. It looks like I'll be ok then! Thanks!
Related resources
August 29, 2009 9:35:46 PM

Great instructions with pictures – although a little dated on technology as it is from November 2007 – but the process and basic instructions still apply. It will give you a good overview of the process and what to expect, but you need to follow the manuals for your components, particularly the mobo and cpu, to get the specifics right for your parts.
http://techreport.com/articles.x/13671

OC the CPU and video cards is all you need to do. In the process of OC the CPU, you will also be adjusting the bus and memory speeds.

August 30, 2009 12:02:25 AM

Congrats man! Your going to have a blast building.

My first build I did, unfortunately, I didn't respect the power of static electricity and well lets just say it is powerful against a mobo haha. So when you build just be very careful of your surroundings!
August 30, 2009 4:26:04 AM

Do you know what I can do to prevent static from building up? I heard I should just touch my case every once in a while to avoid it building up in my body...
August 30, 2009 4:57:01 AM

yes you can touch the case, but make sure that you are not working on a surface that generates static, aka carpet. you can also purchase one of those static wristbands. they're cheap, like five dollars ( i got mine for 4.99 @ microcenter)
August 30, 2009 5:32:30 AM

I would recomend getting either the asus p6t deluxe v2 or the republic of gamers micro atx mobo instead. better overclocking performance. I know its a little more money but you going to have the mobo for quite some time. its just my opinion. also i would go for the hyper x 9-9-9-25 2000 mhz ram at newegg.com for $145 or the 10-10-10-30 ocz 2000mhz for $119.99 both are 3X2 GB tripple channel kits.
August 30, 2009 5:34:16 AM

oh and the Segate baracuda 1.5 TB out performs the samsung and at $120 usd from newegg.com the price per byte is hard to beat
August 30, 2009 7:03:15 AM

Ahh no no no. I feel like you are recommending that RAM just because it is 2000 Mhz. With DDR3 right now...there is no noticeable performance increase above 1333 Mhz. Plus you can get lower latency with 1333, so in some cases that will even be faster. Haha I haven't seen 10 latency in awhile.

I'm so excited for you man! If I was building right now this is pretty close to what I would pick out. So I'm officially jealous ^_^
August 30, 2009 7:09:48 AM

timbo1130 said:
oh and the Segate baracuda 1.5 TB out performs the samsung and at $120 usd from newegg.com the price per byte is hard to beat


Also false.
August 30, 2009 2:17:32 PM

Yep I'm pretty stoked....I already ordered the parts so no time for changes! It was already over budget for me so an extra 30-40$ here and there is alot for me....I could be homeless if I kept going for better and better parts :D . Anyways thanks for your help guys at this site, you guys made me confident in my purchase. I would've probably just bought an already made computer at a retail store if it wasn't for this site. Thanks again!

PS. How long does it take for standard shipping to get all my parts?
August 30, 2009 2:25:32 PM

only i7 extremes can use ram above 1600mhz to its full potential
August 31, 2009 2:32:03 AM

FallenSniper said:
Very nice. If you aren't confident in your build, feel free to look through other threads about i7 builds, most of them are pretty similar.

Heres a few really quick tips about building your own PC (there are tons of ways to do it but this is how I go about it)

-Put your HDD and DVD Drive in the case first. Then you kinda put the motherboard in, and plug in everything where it fits.

-Read the motherboard manual, or at least look at the quick set up sheet if it ships with one.

-Take your time, it's better to take 10 minutes longer than it is to break something and wait for a new part to get shipped.

-It's really not as hard as it sounds, "building a computer" can sound intimidating, but its really just putting a lot of parts together

-Have fun!! ^_^


Edit: Dude you get a free 4GB flash drive!!!! :D 


--"Take your time, it's better to take 10 minutes longer than it is to break something and wait for a new part to get shipped."

-I agree 100000000%, yes you maybe anxious to get your new build up and running but read the quote fallensniper wrote...nothing further needs to be said. You wouldn't believe how many people i know who hurried to build everything and when they couldn't do something instead of asking for help they just shoved the computer part inside with force and it broke...and they had to wait another week without their PC waiting for the new part to be shipped.
August 31, 2009 8:34:45 PM

Related to taking your time is also making sure you take the time to do the proper testing as you build the sysem - especially with memtest and prime95. Hopefully you know the tests to do as you build so the problem, if you have one, is isolated.
August 31, 2009 8:51:34 PM

bundoog said:
just touch my case every once in a while to avoid it building up in my body...
I would make sure to touch the case before picking up each and every part, and I even keep my forearm resting against the case as much as possible while installing.
September 1, 2009 4:02:10 AM

rockyjohn said:
Related to taking your time is also making sure you take the time to do the proper testing as you build the sysem - especially with memtest and prime95. Hopefully you know the tests to do as you build so the problem, if you have one, is isolated.


Um.....I have no clue what tests I'm supposed to do. All I read from guides is how to build the PC but is there anywhere I can learn about what other things I should be doing like the kind of testing you mentioned? Also is it recommended or should I do it only if my PC is having problems?
September 1, 2009 5:35:22 AM

Best thing is to go to the overclocking forum and there should be some recommended (free or free trial) benchmarking programs to burn-in test and utlities like CPUZ to measure temps and such.
September 1, 2009 5:48:41 AM

rockyjohn said:
Related to taking your time is also making sure you take the time to do the proper testing as you build the sysem - especially with memtest and prime95. Hopefully you know the tests to do as you build so the problem, if you have one, is isolated.


When you state "do the proper testing as you build the sysem - especially with memtest and prime95" at what point are these tests done? Which components are installed and which ones aren't at this point?
September 1, 2009 5:59:47 AM

You should test the memory after it is installed - and before most of the other components are added - and then do a stress test on the full system once it appears to be running stable.

1. Before starting the build, it is a good idea to skim through the BIOS section of the mobo manual - just to get an idea of the kinds of settings there. Most you will never use and will stay on the default setting - so no need to try to understand it all now. The idea is just to be familiar with the items so if you want to change something or if an issue does come up, you might remember that there is a BIOS setting that affects it.


Also before starting the build, download the items listed below so you have them conveniently available once starting to build; then use them as noted.

2. Memtest86+

Download the application and instructions from:
http://www.memtest.org/

Also this Wikipedia article provides some good general info.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memtest86

This program is used to test memory. I have only used it on Intel CPUs and assume it works with AMD but am not certain.

On a new system, run the memory test as soon as the base system is installed (CPU, CPU fan, memory, video card, and monitor) and before installing HD, OS, and optical drives. The reason for running it before other components are installed is to try to confirm the memory itself is working prior to installing the other components which could themselves affect the test. Once you have a lot of components installed it is harder to determinine the cause of some symptoms - that is which component is not working correctly.

You should run it for a few passes first. If you encounter problems, they should be addressed then before adding more components. If you get a good first run, then it should be run overnight (or for a good 8 hours). If system is working right it will report no errors, which gives you a lot of confidence in this portion of the system.

3. Download Prime95 and the Wiki article about it

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prime95
http://majorgeeks.com/Prime95_d4363.html

This is used to test the full system operating at full load for a continuous period of time. Note that this is particularly useful in testing system stability and cooling performance. One thing you should watch after a new build is CPU temperatures to ensure the HSF was installed correctly and has a good "bond" with the CPU. This is particularly useful for ensuring that.


4. Download CPU-Z

http://www.cpuid.com/cpuz.php

The software provides a wealth of statistics about how your system is operating.


After your system is up and running, I recommend downloading a copy of the mobo manual. . I find it much easier a year or two later to go to my stored manual than to run down the hard copy. Also note the links on the page for info on how to check your BIOS version and how to update your BIOS. Actually I like to download manuals and spec info on other hardware components as well since printed manuals tend to get lost over time and online data on legacy components also get harder to find over time.

September 1, 2009 6:37:59 AM

Before you do any of that...I would put it all together and see if it turns on ^_^
September 1, 2009 4:38:30 PM

FallenSniper said:
Before you do any of that...I would put it all together and see if it turns on ^_^


Haha that's what I was thinking. That's some good info up there but I think I'll probably just put together the build and then do some tests...I would feel more confident that way and just pray that nothing is faulty so I don't have to spend extra time pinpointing the problems.

Thanks for the info on those tests man I will definitely do them after I do some more reading on them. Thanks!
September 1, 2009 4:59:28 PM

timbo1130 said:
I would recomend getting either the asus p6t deluxe v2 or the republic of gamers micro atx mobo instead. better overclocking performance. I know its a little more money but you going to have the mobo for quite some time. its just my opinion. also i would go for the hyper x 9-9-9-25 2000 mhz ram at newegg.com for $145 or the 10-10-10-30 ocz 2000mhz for $119.99 both are 3X2 GB tripple channel kits.


Cas 10 is on DDR3 is not cool. If it were like DDR5 4000Mhz (which isn't out yet), CAS 10 would probably be superb.
September 1, 2009 6:00:42 PM

Yea one last thing, besides gpu and CPU what else can I overclock in my build?
September 1, 2009 6:02:00 PM

your ram can be oveclocked too
September 1, 2009 6:15:39 PM

bundoog said:
Yea one last thing, besides gpu and CPU what else can I overclock in my build?

Overclock the fans.
September 1, 2009 6:34:28 PM

Your RAM should overclock along with your CPU...
September 1, 2009 11:36:04 PM

Should I use Prime95 after I overclock or before I do so?
September 1, 2009 11:37:40 PM

Before to establish a baseline and test your components.

Otherwise you have nothing to compare your overclocking to.
September 4, 2009 8:45:41 AM

Ok guys I'm having some problems. I got my parts and starting building but the best I could do was get the pc going but with a black screen. The fans are running and my blue led lights on the antec are working. The monitor was plugged and and into the video card. I feel the problem is that the power supply to the video card does not fully plug in...i don't know how to check this because the gpu fans run with or without the power plugged into the gpu. Can you guys give me any suggestions? I've already taken it out of the case and unplugged everything and going to retry it out of the case totally. I'm pretty lost even though I did lots of research it just seems like it might've not been enough. Its 5 am here already and I'm dead tired putting this thing together so I'll update you guys later today after I catch some sleep.
September 4, 2009 2:38:45 PM

if you have an old Graphics card laying around (or borrow one from friends) to see its the Graphics that is faulty. Else do as follows

..............................................................................................................

Firstly touch the metal case to remove any static that have build up in your body.

Unplug the power Cable from the back of the Power supply. Also unplug keyboard, mouse, speaker cables.

Reset the Motherboard, there should be a reset button(jumper) on Motherboard. Or simply take the battery out and put it back in. Refer to motherboard manual for further instructions.

Carefully remove all parts from motherboard, leaving only the cpu and the fan. Then unplug all cables (i.e HD, DVD, case etc) connected to the motherboard except the Power supply cable and of course CPU fan.

Now add the Graphics Card, make sure it sits on the slot properly.

Now add just 1 Memory card in Slot 1. Make sure you insert it the right way. There's a guider at the bottom of card to help you, if you notice one side of metal connectors is longer than the other side. You should hear clicking sound once insert it properly. Now add the second Memory card in Slot 2. You can leave the third one till later.

Now connect the main power cable to back of Power supply and connect the Monitor cable to the Graphics card. Make sure the monitor is switched On.

Now is time to switch on the Motherboard, either by pressing the internal Power button located on MotherBoard or by locating the power Switch cable coming from the front of the Case and connecting it to the motherboard jumpers (it might be labelled PW or PWR).


The screen should display the bios screen. If it does that means these party are not the cause of the fault. If it doesn’t the go - Part 2

Then what you do is Disconnect the power and add the parts one bye one to the system. Each time you add part or connect a cable, turn the system on to make sure it works.

Basically this is one way to find what is causing a blank screen.

......................................................................................
PART 2 (still have blank screen)
......................................................................................

Unplug the power Cable from the back of the Power supply. Also unplug keyboard, mouse, speaker cables etc

Carefully remove all parts from motherboard, leaving only the cpu, the fan. Then unplug all cables connected to the motherboard.

Very carefully unscrew motherboard and take it out from the case. Place it on top of the Motherboard box, with the anti static bag underneath it.

Now add memory to slot 1 and 2 as before. remember it must click when insert it. Next add the Graphics Card, make sure it sits on the slot properly.

Now connect the power cables from the power supply to the motherboard.

Now connect the main power cable to back of Power supply and connect the Monitor cable to the Graphics card. Make sure the monitor is switched On.

Now is time to switch on the Motherboard, either by pressing the internal Power button located on Motherboard or by making a metal contact to motherboard Power jumpers (it might be labelled PW or PWR).

The screen should display the bios screen. If it does that means these party are not the cause of the fault, it could be that you did not install Motherboard to case properly.


However if the fault still exist, it means it could CPU, Graphics card, Memory or Motherboard that is causing the fault.

.............................................................................................................
Part three
.............................................................................................................


When an IBM compatible computer is first turned on, the hardware runs a Power-On Self Test (POST). If errors are encountered during this POST test, they are usually displayed via an audio beep or in the form of a code number flashed across the screen. With this audio code in hand, you can determine what part of the system is having problems and find a solution.

The pattern of beeps whether its the number of beeps or the length of those beeps will give you an indication of the actual problem. Its a distress signal from the computer in a morse code like pattern. Unless you have a diagnostic card to tell you more about the particular problem, you will have to use the charts to decipher the computer error and get your machine back up and running.

Full chart is listed at http://www.pchell.com/hardware/beepcodes.shtml

Remember to connect the case's speaker cable to motherboard to hear these beebs.



Good Luck !! I hope this has been helpfull
September 4, 2009 2:59:36 PM

bundoog said:
Haha that's what I was thinking. That's some good info up there but I think I'll probably just put together the build and then do some tests...I would feel more confident that way and just pray that nothing is faulty so I don't have to spend extra time pinpointing the problems.

Apparently your prayers did not work. It might have been better to pray less and test more. There is a reason for doing some basic testing as you go, as I explained with the instructions.
Shorcuts often are not.

But look on the bright side. On reason to build your own was to learn about doing it. With the troubleshooting now you will be learning a whole lot more about building a PC - and getting extra practice. Hopefully you have also learned not to take too many shortcuts.
September 4, 2009 3:46:55 PM

Did you get both power cables plugged into the motherboard - the 24pin and the 8pin?
September 4, 2009 3:51:16 PM

bundoog said:
I feel the problem is that the power supply to the video card does not fully plug in...


If its not plugged in all the way, that's your problem. It can be a bit tight plugging in. I would call it a little more than snug.
September 4, 2009 5:56:22 PM

Quote:
Apparently your prayers did not work. It might have been better to pray less and test more. There is a reason for doing some basic testing as you go, as I explained with the instructions.
Shorcuts often are not.

But look on the bright side. On reason to build your own was to learn about doing it. With the troubleshooting now you will be learning a whole lot more about building a PC - and getting extra practice. Hopefully you have also learned not to take too many shortcuts.


Really?

You think he should of run some tests within windows to make sure everything is working properly? Brilliant idea minus the fact that he can't get anything to display on his screen. You have to plug stuff in before you can test it. Sorry.

Annd yes I know they aren't all 'within windows.' But you still need a display.
September 4, 2009 6:13:34 PM

Ok thanks for some help. So far I did what you said ibnsina in Part 1 up till installing the graphic card. It seems like only 1 out of the 4 PCI-E connectors fit into the graphics card and the rest don't go in because I think the connectors inside are crooked. I need 2 of the 6-pin connectors to be in but only 1 fits in properly. Should I try straightening the rods in the connectors a bit? I know the 6pin connectors on the GPU is fine because it's perfectly straight and both connections fit in fine with the working PCI-e connector. If I have to send the PSU back then I will.
September 4, 2009 6:23:09 PM

Yeah try straightening them a little. Its hard to say without seeing it, but if they are just off center a little bit you might be able to start it at an angle when putting it in then straighten it out. I actually had to do that for mine, but it wasn't bad at all.
September 4, 2009 6:44:08 PM

OMG YESSS!!! I litterally spend like an hour fixing the connectors on one of the PCI-e cables and fiddling with the metal inside and now it actually fitss! I jsut hope I didn;t screw it up by moving the metal things inside :S. I guess if I'm doing crossfire I'm gonna have to spend more hours fixing the other cables :(  Anyways I'm moving on and I'll let you guys know what's up...thanks for the help guys!!
September 4, 2009 7:07:58 PM

Ok I got something on the screen finally! It says reboot with proper boot device or something....what do I do? Does this mean my parts are all working?
September 4, 2009 7:11:38 PM

And also my mobo is outside the case right now....should I re-install it to the case again or should I continue with testing and work with it outside the case?
September 4, 2009 7:21:04 PM

If you have the display working and all the memory installed, then I would run the memory test first and if you get it to run overnight without failure then go ahead and put mobo in the case.
September 4, 2009 7:21:52 PM

Thats great. Now your hard drive should be connected and set DVD drive to boot to first, you do this from the bios. hit the Del button to inter the bios. save the setting.

Insert the Windows DVD/CD boot disk into the drive and Restart the system. After the system has been restarted, wait until you see a line at the bottom of the screen displaying some thing like 'hit any key to enter installations'. So hit any key to inter the windows Installations.

Good Luck
September 4, 2009 7:24:42 PM

Lol, I only test after over clocking or if I have an issue. I expect my parts to work out of the box. Maybe I'm lucky, but I've never had to RMA anything.
September 4, 2009 7:29:30 PM

Thanks guys, so I'm going to put it in the case and hook it all up to the drives and see if I can install Windows 7. Yea I was hoping that everything would work perfectly because it sucks to wait like 1-2 weeks for another part to come in when your too damn excited to build the new computer. I'll let you guys know how it progresses though. Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!
September 4, 2009 7:32:36 PM

FallenSniper said:
Quote:
Apparently your prayers did not work. It might have been better to pray less and test more. There is a reason for doing some basic testing as you go, as I explained with the instructions.
Shorcuts often are not.

But look on the bright side. On reason to build your own was to learn about doing it. With the troubleshooting now you will be learning a whole lot more about building a PC - and getting extra practice. Hopefully you have also learned not to take too many shortcuts.


Really?

You think he should of run some tests within windows to make sure everything is working properly? Brilliant idea minus the fact that he can't get anything to display on his screen. You have to plug stuff in before you can test it. Sorry.

Annd yes I know they aren't all 'within windows.' But you still need a display.


Let's see - in the first paragraph you attack me. Then in the second you admit that the assumptions you used in first paragraph - that you need windows loaded and other stuff plugged in - is false and reduce your attack to "but you still neeed a display". Now I am confused. In my instructions for running the first test - the memory test - I said to plug in the video card and monitor first. So you are attacking because a display is needed but I said one was needed. What is this? You should be careful in when making condescending attacks - like your sarcastic "Brilliant idea" - because it only comes back to burn you and destroy your credibility when wrong like that - in fact it makes you look pretty foolish.
September 4, 2009 7:49:00 PM

Well its up to you, may be is best to install Windows when the motherboard is installed in the case, with every parts and cables being connected.

The memory test been recommened is a good idea.

If you can download the latest drivers for your mother board (esp chipset), graphics card, sound from the internet. Most likely the one supplied are out of date. Be very becarefull you download the right drivers for your part.

Asus Motherboard download center http://support.asus.com/download/Download.aspx?SLanguag...

ATI Radeon drivers
http://support.amd.com/us/Pages/AMDSupportHub.aspx

Also dont forget to windows by visiting update.microsoft.com

September 4, 2009 7:59:55 PM

Quote:
rockyjohn wrote :

Let's see - in the first paragraph you attack me. Then in the second you admit that the assumptions you used in first paragraph - that you need windows loaded and other stuff plugged in - is false and reduce your attack to "but you still neeed a display". Now I am confused. In my instructions for running the first test - the memory test - I said to plug in the video card and monitor first. So you are attacking because a display is needed but I said one was needed. What is this? You should be careful in when making condescending attacks - like your sarcastic "Brilliant idea" - because it only comes back to burn you and destroy your credibility when wrong like that - in fact it makes you look pretty foolish.


How and where was I wrong? He clearly stated that his video was not working, and you responded by telling him he should have run tests. How is he supposed to do such when he has no video? Sorry if I came across as attacking you but it's just that you asked him to do something impossible. So sure, your first instructions were accurate, I thought they were fine. But my point is you told him he should have run tests and somehow the result of him not running tests was no video? You logic was just not accurate. I don't want to get in any unnecessary argument here, but I think one aspect of this forum is that we can correct each other when wrong without throwing a fit, right?
September 4, 2009 10:32:46 PM

My logic was very accurate and I never asked him to do anything that was impossible. Had he tried to do the memory test when I suggested, he would have discovered the display problem at that point - before assembling the rest of the PC and then subsequently disassemblying it. And saved a lot of time plus would have quickly focused on his issue on connecting the video card - and being able to isolate issues was exactly the reason I gave for doing the test then and not waiting for system to be completely assembled.

Certainly we can correct one another without thorwing a fit. Are you now accusing me of throwing a fit? You must be lest why else bring it up. In your previous post you attacked me with the sarcastic "Bright ideas" comment. And all I did was objectively point out your error to correct misleading information. Now you play innocent and say you don't want unneccessary arguments then turn around and imply I was throwing a fit in my last post? I did not throw a fit. All I did was objectively prove you wrong. Please stop posting inaccurate information and stop trying to paint yourself as the innocent agrieved party while simultaniously making more attacks.
September 5, 2009 1:25:54 AM

All I'm saying is you told him to he should have run a memtest, and somehow the result of him not running a memtest is why his video wasn't working. When his video wasn't working you replied by saying:
Quote:
rocky john wrote:

Apparently your prayers did not work. It might have been better to pray less and test more. There is a reason for doing some basic testing as you go, as I explained with the instructions.
Shorcuts often are not.


I just don't agree with that response. Even if he had run attempted to run the memtest he still would have had the video card problem (now we know why). That's the only point I've been trying to make since the beginning... It may have been shortsighted of me to accuse you of being wrong, but I'm willing to move past it ^_^
!