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have a Seagate 40 Gig Hard Drive that is "Security Freeze Locked."lock

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June 24, 2011 1:20:30 PM

have a Seagate 40 Gig Hard Drive that is "Security Freeze Locked."
a c 104 G Storage
June 24, 2011 2:09:45 PM

Hi there, and welcome to Tom's Hardware!

Not sure what you mean by 'Security Freeze Locked'. Give us more detail about your computer, information about this Seagate HDD, if it is attached to your computer as a SATA, or IDE drive, or if external USB, eSATA or Firewire, and the file system, FAT-32, NTFS, etc.
Please explain if certain accounts don't have permission to access files, or if it was EFS encrypted and you don't have a key, or if it came from a Bit Locked computer.

With more detailed info, someone will help you find a solution
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September 7, 2011 2:34:18 PM

nipuhome said:
have a Seagate 40 Gig Hard Drive that is "Security Freeze Locked."


"Freeze Lock" is an ATA Command.

You can "Lock", not to be confused with "Freeze Lock", a hard disk drive with a password, requiring a password to entered before OS boot up to "Unlock" the drive, allowing use of the drive; otherwise it will not be accessible. Unless you are running Linux or another environment that supports ATA Commands within the OS, Windows, by itself, does not.

There are third-party programs that will create a linux based work space within windows, but requires a lot know how. I tried to run it once but did not work for me and the instructions are not very helpful for first timers at all.

Freeze Lock, will disable all ATA commands except for "disable" and "erase" commands, requiring a password to do so. This is designed to prevent attacks attempting to bypass the security feature to gain the password to the hard drive.

I know of 2 "possible" ways to get around this. I have heard people leaving their PC on and come back in the morning and the drive is locked. Don't know how true this is or not but, one way is the HDDerase program, or similar name. This WILL erase everything on the drive if it succeeds, leaving you with a usable HDD again. Again, its possible for it to work, not guaranteed.

The other way I am not going to discuss, most hackers most likely already know this technique but, require prolonged access to the computer/device and carries with it the possibility of loosing data and possibly rendering the drive useless. I have not tried it with any PATA drives yet but, I have tried with 2 different SATA drive manufacturers and met with success.

I may try and start a business, this way should anything come up in question about stolen PC's or what have you, I will have personal information to the perps, address, credit card, etc., information I can provide authorities, which I can't legally ask for not having a business license. However, I have my doubts about it since this was the most recent post I've seen so far with this issue, most are 2009, 2007, seems like this issue has been resolved. Unless there is some super imported stuff on it, you can pick up much larger drives really cheap these days, under $40. I've seen some 250GB and 500GB for $35 or so.

Wonder if anyone will ever read this lol.
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