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C drive is full. how do i transfer files to D?

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June 25, 2011 2:20:48 AM

Recently, I took my laptop in for repair. A new HD was installed and tech installed partitions, neglecting to inform me. As such, as I downloaded files, I pressed "Install" without regard to which Drive. "C:" is now FULL, how do I transfer files to "D", safely, and which files are OS, that , I understand, must remain in C. Thanks
a b D Laptop
a c 116 G Storage
June 25, 2011 4:08:39 PM

Programs cannot (and should not) be just transferred from one partition to another, or from one drive to another. If you do so, there are 'common' components which will create a problem.

There are specific programs that will change partitions; Partition Magic - http://www.partition-magic-windows7.com/res/change-part...

http://forums.cnet.com/7723-7588_102-186341.html

http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/diskdirec...

The cleanest way is to re-format and re-install everything with the right partition size (let Windows decide). I know that this is a lot of work, but the results are worth it.

If you want to experiment, make a clone of the hard disk, and play around with the clone.
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June 27, 2011 8:41:18 PM

jcougfan1980 said:
Recently, I took my laptop in for repair. A new HD was installed and tech installed partitions, neglecting to inform me. As such, as I downloaded files, I pressed "Install" without regard to which Drive. "C:" is now FULL, how do I transfer files to "D", safely, and which files are OS, that , I understand, must remain in C. Thanks


Games etc can just be lifted from C:\program files to D:\program files. Just correct the shortcuts. They will usually save all game variables in user specific locations that you can leave where they are. eg: C:\documents and settings\<your username> or C:\users\<your username>.

A rebuild is a bit drastic if you're already up and running. I'd just shift a few games, and then as you install new stuff and remove the stuff you no longer use it should even out.

If you wanted to chuck on a linux partition you could remove the D: partition and expand the C:\ drive over the new 'whitespace'. Haven't seen a windows tool that does this, so not 100% sorry.
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June 27, 2011 11:19:18 PM

For free and open partition management software, I can highly recommend GParted, although it does require a bit of knowledge to use.

http://gparted.sourceforge.net/

I strongly recommend doing a backup of your vital data first, though!
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a b D Laptop
a c 371 G Storage
June 28, 2011 4:24:27 PM

Why not just uninstall the programs and reinstall them on the other drive. Just move any saves or data manually.
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February 8, 2014 10:42:56 AM

jcougfan1980 said:
Recently, I took my laptop in for repair. A new HD was installed and tech installed partitions, neglecting to inform me. As such, as I downloaded files, I pressed "Install" without regard to which Drive. "C:" is now FULL, how do I transfer files to "D", safely, and which files are OS, that , I understand, must remain in C. Thanks


Best advice I can ever give someone:
NEVER leave your computer set up with JUST a C: drive (or one drive). Bad idea. If it fills up, unless you are an computer expert, you will have to figure out what to delete or wipe and start over

It's best to always buy a computer with 2 PHYSICAL hard drives in them.

Have C:, the Windows/System drive, be a smaller drive.. 500GB, 1TB, etc.. or in the case of an SSD, 256-512GB... then have a 2TB D: drive added when you buy it...

Anytime you install ANYTHING, tell it to install to D:

It will still put common and shared and certain other files on C:, but it won't fill up C:

Another trick is you can SAFELY move the location AND files of ANY of your user folders from C: to any other drive! :) 

Just right click my music, documents, downloads, etc and give it a new path and windows will ask you if you want to move your existing files! :)  Just don't move the music folder if iTunes or another media program uses that folder

The first thing I do when I get a new computer.. and I've done things since the 90s when 2GB drives were huge :)  is I've ALWAYS had 2-3 physical HDDs in the system

If you have the $$ to spend, make D: a Raid 5 array that's 6-16TBs (either using 3 2TBs, 3TBs, or 4TBs). Raid 5 will "eat" the space of one drive, but if one of those drives fail, you can still use the array (at a much slower rate) until you simply slap in another drive (of the same size), and add it into the array and it rebuilds itself. You still need to back up as this doesn't protect against corruption, file deletion, etc. But it DOES protect you from hardware HD failure. Plus Raid 5 will give you a mild performance boost over a single drive.

My current system is set up like this

Logical Drive C: Mirror (or Raid 1)
Drive 0 = 512GB SSD SATA 3
Drive 1 = 512GB SSD SATA 3
This is shown to windows as a single 512GB drive but if one fails, the other works. I just yank out the bad drive and windows just boots. When I replace it, the raid controller will re mirror things. Safer than raid 5 but slower


Logical, 12TB, Drive D:, Raid 5
Drive 2 = 4TB Sata 3 HDD
Drive 3 = 4TB Sata 3 HDD
Drive 4 = 4TB Sata 3 HDD
Drive 5 = 4TB Sata 3 HDD

External USB 3 Raid 0 backup array, E:
4, 4TB drives for 16TB of backup space in raid 0.. not for performance but for space
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