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* Difference in RAM * ?

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November 23, 2009 1:16:30 PM

I'm looking at getting the i7 920 processor and the P6T Le motherboard. Now I need to decide on RAM, but I don't know what all the specifications mean :(  I would GREATLY appreciate it if someone broke it down for me.

I took the specs straight from new egg:


Perfect match for Core i5 & Core i7
CORSAIR XMS3 8GB (4 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMX8GX3M4A1600C9 - Retail

* Cas Latency: 9
* Timing: 9-9-9-24
* Voltage: 1.65V
* Multi-channel Kit: Quad Channel Kit
* Heat Spreader: Yes
* Features: 8GB memory kit (4 x 2GB) for use with Dual Channel DDR3 Intel Core i5 and Core i7 processors Intel XMP (Extreme Memory Profile) Support XMS Heat Spreader
* Parts: Lifetime limited
* Labor: Lifetime limited
* Model #: CMX8GX3M4A1600C9
* Item #: N82E16820145261
* Return Policy: Memory Standard Return Policy




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November 23, 2009 3:24:12 PM

thanks for the suggestion :D 

I noticed that some say Triple channel kit and some say Quad channel kit. What is this referring to? I've noticed that when there are 4 X 2GB , it says quad and when it is 3 X 2 GB , it says triple.

Also, should I pay attention to the Voltage? And what is "Cas latency" and "Timing" ?

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November 23, 2009 3:36:56 PM

I think they are referring that there is 4 x 2gb sticks. I don't think quad channel kit is out yet... but I could be wrong.
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November 23, 2009 4:17:11 PM

peanutpc said:
I think they are referring that there is 4 x 2gb sticks. I don't think quad channel kit is out yet... but I could be wrong.


also, I have been googling the difference between 1333 and 1600 RAM, but have been finding different answers. It is clear that when running the i7 920 at stock clock (2.66), you only need 1066 RAM. But I'm planning on overclocking at 3.2 so would 1600 RAM be overkill? Could I settle for 1333 or do I really need 1600 ?

thanks!
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November 23, 2009 4:31:22 PM

For everyday computing, you won't even notice the difference between the three (1066, 1333 & 1600).

With a D0 stepping i7 920, you could easily overclock to 3.6~4.0 Ghz with a good hsf & memory.

If I were to build a new rig, I would choose 1333 with cas 7.


Why don't you think about building a i5/i7 (socket LGA 1156) rig? It cost less and with the money you save, could get a better gpu or case.

I had build 2 rigs with i7 860 in last 2weeks and it performs just like a i7 920 and it OC like a champ.

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November 23, 2009 4:48:20 PM

peanutpc said:
For everyday computing, you won't even notice the difference between the three (1066, 1333 & 1600).

With a D0 stepping i7 920, you could easily overclock to 3.6~4.0 Ghz with a good hsf & memory.

If I were to build a new rig, I would choose 1333 with cas 7.


Why don't you think about building a i5/i7 (socket LGA 1156) rig? It cost less and with the money you save, could get a better gpu or case.

I had build 2 rigs with i7 860 in last 2weeks and it performs just like a i7 920 and it OC like a champ.


This PC is going to be for intense music production, so its not just everyday computing. Would you still recommend that for music production?

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November 23, 2009 5:36:28 PM

I7 920 or 860, you won't be disappointed. If you decide to go with i7 920, you will have option to upgrade to Core i9 when it comes out.

Go 8GB (DDR3 1600) with 860 & 6GB with 920. 3 or 4GB won't cut it with kind of work you do.

If live near by Micro Center (www.microcenter.com), you could get a i7 860 for $230.00 & i7 920 for $200.00.



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November 23, 2009 5:38:52 PM

I'm guessing you already have a sound card if your planning on using it for intense music production. Well Random Access Memory(RAM) is used to speed loading times of programs, games etc. So the higher the clock speed of the RAM ie. : 1333Mhz or 1600Mhz, the faster it loads data to the RAM. The latency and timings are just used to compare in between RAM with the same clock speed. Lower being better, ie. : 7-7-7-20 is better than 9-9-9-24. During normal computing you won't be able to see the difference but using programs like Photoshop will see a big jump in performance when you have more and faster RAM with tight timings. As an article in toms concluded :http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/memory-scaling-i7,review-..., if its for gaming a 1333Mhz would be sufficient. If your gonna use the PC for programs that needs a lot of data to be on hand then more RAM n lower timings for you. The voltage just states how much power is going to be supplied to it and it also tells you how much heat its going to dissipate. Read the link there if you want to know if its overkill. But if you have the cash why not.
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November 23, 2009 5:39:02 PM

peanutpc said:
I7 920 or 860, you won't be disappointed. If you decide to go with i7 920, you will have option to upgrade to Core i9 when it comes out.

Go 8GB (DDR3 1600) with 860 & 6GB with 920. 3 or 4GB won't cut it with kind of work you do.

If live near by Micro Center (www.microcenter.com), you could get a i7 860 for $230.00 & i7 920 for $200.00.


yea, I live pretty close to a microcenter and I was planning on getting it from there. Do you know if they will be having good black friday deals for computer parts?
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