Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

How many Amps can this surge protector support?

Last response: in Components
Share
November 24, 2009 12:28:36 AM

Last time when i plugged in my computer into a extension block that was laying around the house, i hadent known i over-voltaged it and my PSU got fried, so now i bought a surge protector but im not sure how many amps it can support

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3...

Will that be able to support my computer, 14A + monitor, 4A?
November 24, 2009 12:35:53 AM

Your computer pulls 14A? You do realize that 14A is over 1600W, right?
m
0
l
a c 271 ) Power supply
November 24, 2009 12:46:23 AM

If your computer is pulling 14 amps i would be far more worried about your houses circuit breaker. That surge protector will handle the current draw through it fine, but if you really are pulling 14 amps to a single outlet i would be concerned about your house wiring more than the surge protector.
m
0
l
Related resources
November 24, 2009 2:21:18 AM

im using a corsair 850TX PSU, the power cable that connects from the wall outlet to the PSU has a little card on it, which says 13A, 125V (sorry, i meant 13A before)

Or wait, does the power cable specify the maximum energy load it can take? Or the PSU's?
m
0
l
a c 271 ) Power supply
November 24, 2009 2:28:14 AM

That little card on the power cable specifies how much power the power cable can handle, they had standardized connectors on the end but the 13 amp rating on it means that you shouldnt use it to power something like a 1600 watt power supply which would come with its own power cable with heavier gauge wiring.

The 850TX wont draw any more than about 10 amps at full load, which will be hard to do, combined with the monitor you are still well within a safe range for the surge suppressor and household wiring.
m
0
l
November 24, 2009 5:18:54 PM

so a houseplug cant pull no more than 15A? i guess

oh, yeah, and how many amps does a 850TX PSU take?
m
0
l
a c 271 ) Power supply
November 24, 2009 5:49:58 PM

Most homes use primarily 15A circuit breakers which restricts you to drawing no more than 15A from all of the plug on that circuit combined.

The 850TX will provide up to 850 watts of DC power, divide that by its worst case efficiency rating of 80%, and you have a worst case AC draw of about 1060W. Dividing this by 110V, the nominal domestic AC voltage, and you come up with 9.64A as your worst case current draw by the 850TX. Even a large LCD monitor has a power draw of less than 100W, so at most you will be pulling about 10.5A from the wall for your computer and monitor leaving you well within the safe range for both the surge supressor and your house's wiring.
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 24, 2009 6:58:56 PM

Surge protectors are rated in JOUE. It’s the unit of energy to produce one Watt of power for one second.

Surge protectors vary in Energy Rating or JOULES. Look at the sticker or information on the surge protector you are buying.

The HIGHER the JOULE RATING THE BETTER. It means the surge protector can protect the load higher amount of energy beyond what is normally needed.

Don't confuse it with the AMP Rating of the SURGE PROTECTOR. In most cases the AMP rating defines the current the SURGE PROTECTOR can take. That includes the circuit breaker (when included) on the surge protector. The AMP rating does not translate to energy protection rating that is specified in JOULE.

SURGE protector is the protection circuit that protects the load from excessive energy from the wall outlet going to the load. These circuitries react way faster than the circuit breaker as excess energy from power anomalies happen in micro-seconds or even faster.

IT IS POSSIBLE TO HAVE HIGH CURRENT CAPACITY BUT VERLY ENERGY RATING (LOW JOULE RATING).

Below is the path for more information pertaining to JOULE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joule

Note: I recommend that you be clear with your need. If you need more capacity then you need more AMPS (Current). If you are interested with higher protection level then you need higher energy rating (Higher JOULE).
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 24, 2009 7:02:12 PM

Typo Correction:

IT IS POSSIBLE TO HAVE HIGH CURRENT CAPACITY BUT VERLY LOW ENERGY RATING (LOW JOULE RATING).
m
0
l
November 24, 2009 7:54:37 PM

ok well...

The old surge protecter, which burned out my PSU also has a max load of 15A and 125V

Does max load mean the maximum surge it can take? Or the maximum energy it can give out through its extension block. Becuse i REALLY dont want to burn out another PSU -.-

If your wondering, i had my monitor, computer, and lamp plugged in, although i doubt the lamp takes too much energy.
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 25, 2009 5:13:28 AM

The AMP rating on the surge protector specifies the MAX amount of current that can pass through from its Wall Plug distributed to the different outlets of the surge-protector.

A 15A 125V extension, or a Surge-Protector extension should be more than enough for your load. A 15A , 125VAC is 1875 Watts of capacity. Your actual load is not even close to that. I'm not even sure that wall outlets are rated above 15A.

My recommendation is buy a reputable brand of surge protector such as Belkin, Excide, APC. Get an energy rating of above 3500 Joules. Most of this will have current rating of 15A.

The one that you got from Radio Shack is not the one i use in my house. Cheap Surge Protectors? You get what you paid for.

As the other had stated i don't think your PC draws 13A or 14A whatever it is.

Note: Lamps are non-critical load. You don't need a surge protector for it.
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 25, 2009 2:56:29 PM

computernewbie said:
The old surge protecter, which burned out my PSU also has a max load of 15A and 125V

Your assumptions make no sense. If a protector burned out your PSU, then any extension cord or power strip can burn out your PSU. Nonsense.

PSU and incandescent lamps draw about same amps - same power. Your PSU probably failed due to manufacturing defect - the most common reason for PSU failures. Or because it was missing essential functions that have been standard in PSUs since long before the IBM PC existed.

Not only do computer and lamp draw well less than every power strip must provided. But the power strip also has a 15 amp circuit breaker - a backup safety device - that will trip if the load is too large.

Best power strip is a non-surge protector power strip as long as it has that always important 15 amp circuit breaker.
m
0
l
November 26, 2009 6:42:26 PM

westom said:
Your assumptions make no sense. If a protector burned out your PSU, then any extension cord or power strip can burn out your PSU. Nonsense.

PSU and incandescent lamps draw about same amps - same power. Your PSU probably failed due to manufacturing defect - the most common reason for PSU failures. Or because it was missing essential functions that have been standard in PSUs since long before the IBM PC existed.

Not only do computer and lamp draw well less than every power strip must provided. But the power strip also has a 15 amp circuit breaker - a backup safety device - that will trip if the load is too large.

Best power strip is a non-surge protector power strip as long as it has that always important 15 amp circuit breaker.



ok, so your saying that it was a manufactureres defect? When the product is top notch and right after i plugged in the extension block, PSU, monitor, and lamp, the computer wouldent turn on, and after trying several techniques to restart the PSU nothing happend, the PSU got fried.
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 28, 2009 4:21:06 AM

computernewbie said:
... and after trying several techniques to restart the PSU nothing happend, the PSU got fried.

Based upon your other assumptions, I have no reason to believe your PSU is fried. What fries a PSU? All output PSU wires can be shorted together and the PSU plugged in. And that does not harm any standard PSU.

To obtain a useful answer, you must post details - not conclusions based in assumptions. For example, why would a power supply not power up? Because the power supply controller is defective. Did you know about that power supply controller?

I did not say anything about a manufacturing defect. I said your conclusions are not based in how thing work. No power cord - good or defective - can harm any power supply. That you did not know that implies you have also assumed the PSU is fried.

Meanwhile, how do you know any component is good? Because they were new? Another defective assumption. To obtain useful replies, post only what you know. Do not convert speculations and assumptions into conclusions (ie PSU is fried) so that useful replies can occur.
m
0
l
November 29, 2009 9:53:08 PM

westom said:
Based upon your other assumptions, I have no reason to believe your PSU is fried. What fries a PSU? All output PSU wires can be shorted together and the PSU plugged in. And that does not harm any standard PSU.

To obtain a useful answer, you must post details - not conclusions based in assumptions. For example, why would a power supply not power up? Because the power supply controller is defective. Did you know about that power supply controller?

I did not say anything about a manufacturing defect. I said your conclusions are not based in how thing work. No power cord - good or defective - can harm any power supply. That you did not know that implies you have also assumed the PSU is fried.

Meanwhile, how do you know any component is good? Because they were new? Another defective assumption. To obtain useful replies, post only what you know. Do not convert speculations and assumptions into conclusions (ie PSU is fried) so that useful replies can occur.



i had used the power supply several times before i had plugged it into the extension block. What i had done was undervolt the power supply, and thats what killed it. Or the block pulled too much energy and thats what fried it. Ive gotten the new power supply from corsair and they do check whats wrong with it, so if there was a switch or such turned off, they would have repaired it and sent me the old one, instead i got a new one. The core of the question of what im trying to ask is if i plugged in my monitor + computer in together, would either one get fried. But i guess to get an answer i might have to open up the wall plug to see how many amps it disburses, hopefully 15A, enough to support both
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 29, 2009 10:12:06 PM

Quote:
i had used the power supply several times before i had plugged it into the extension block. What i had done was undervolt the power supply, and thats what killed it. Or the block pulled too much energy and thats what fried it.

Undervoltage can be destructive to electric motors. Undervoltage does not harm electronics. Numbers. Voltage drops below 5% are bad for electric motors. Voltage drops of even 20% mean electronics must still work normally. How low can voltage drop? Electronics must work normally and even startup normally when the incandescent bulb is less than 50% intensity. An international standard that has existed long before the IBM PC even existed. And is unknown (apparently) to a majoriity of computer techs.

Power supply only draws the energy it needs. Again, you can short together all outputs of a power supply, then turn on AC power. And even that maximum loading does not harm any standard power supply.

Does not matter even if the wall plug is rated for 500 amps. Neither the monitor nor computer will draw any more power. Both contain power supplies that only draw what is required - nothing more.

How many amps will a wall receptacle provide? That is defined by the shape of the holes that your plug attaches to. If a plug can provide more than 15 amps, then its holes for a plug will be shaped differently. Your plug probably has the holes for NEMA5-15. That means it is rated for 15 amps and connected either to a 15 amp or 20 amp circuit breaker inside the breaker box. That also means the appliance must be limiited to (rated to consume) less than 13 amps.

m
0
l
!