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Graphics card questions

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  • Graphics Cards
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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September 24, 2009 2:16:18 PM

Basically, I was just curious if my graphics card (1GB HD4890) is being bottlenecked by my other system components.
PC specs:
Mobo: Asus P5LD2-X
CPU: Intel Core 2 Duo E4500 @ 2.2Ghz
RAM: 2GB (667 Mhz, not upgraded mobo and RAM for a long time :p  )
GPU: XFX 1GB HD4890
OS: XP SP2

I play alot of games, Prototype, Assassin's Creed, CoD4, WoW, etc...
I have the graphics settings on highest in all games (including AA)
In CoD4 my FPS is hitting 200 constantly (I set 200 as max btw) but, drops to 90 at some points in the map, and keep getting random lag spikes...
So I were curious whether it's any of the following:
1) My mobo needs upgrading to one with a PCI-E 2.0 socket (current board doesn't have one and graphics card is in a PCI-E 16x slot)
2) My CPU is doing it?
3) My RAM is doing it?
4) None of the above? And if so, what's the reason?

Thanks in advance, will appreciate any help. :) 

More about : graphics card questions

a b U Graphics card
September 24, 2009 3:51:44 PM

All of them....
October 3, 2009 4:55:54 PM

ok, sorry for the long reply...
so i were thinking, of upgrading my mobo cpu and ram to the following...
Asus P6T
Intel Core i7 920
4GB Corsair TwinX XMS3, DDR3 PC3-10666 (1333Mhz) Non-ECC Unbuffered

and that should solve the problem?
also staying with XP 32bit, and yes i know XP 32 bit cant handle the full 4GB, but it will still work yes? cause in the future i might test Win 7... but meanwhile... imma stick with XP... or thinking about it, whats XP 64 bit like (gaming-wise) ?

PSU should be able to handle components, its 750w if u're curious...

would love a reply :D 
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a b U Graphics card
October 3, 2009 11:14:08 PM

Yes is perfect, and try with XP Pro x64, BUY a licence and, this version can handle all 4GB

If the PSU is from a good brand isn't a problem. If this isn't a 600W is enough for the rig.
October 4, 2009 1:12:07 AM

No-One said:
ok, sorry for the long reply...
so i were thinking, of upgrading my mobo cpu and ram to the following...
Asus P6T
Intel Core i7 920
4GB Corsair TwinX XMS3, DDR3 PC3-10666 (1333Mhz) Non-ECC Unbuffered

and that should solve the problem?
also staying with XP 32bit, and yes i know XP 32 bit cant handle the full 4GB, but it will still work yes? cause in the future i might test Win 7... but meanwhile... imma stick with XP... or thinking about it, whats XP 64 bit like (gaming-wise) ?

PSU should be able to handle components, its 750w if u're curious...

would love a reply :D 


Sorry to intrude...

That'll be more than enough. An i7 920 is only bottlenecked by two 5870s in XFire, from the various articles I've read, and the components you specify above are mostly top-of-the-line (equivalent).

I suggest you switch to Windows 7 once it comes out. My fiddling with the Beta and the RC resulting in improvements of about 7-10% over Vista and 5% over XP.

The PSU will definitely take care of itself, you can stick another 4890 in there and still have a couple watts left over.
October 4, 2009 1:24:56 AM

Hang on a minute!!!!! The only thing potentially bottlenecking your card is the CPU. And your PSU should be fine regardless of make if its 750watt. (as long as you dont get too close to using the full 750watt, but lookin @ your system your likely using 400watt or less)

Dual core @ 2.2GHz is quite weak and is likely bottlenecking the card at low resolutions, which to be honest wont really affect your gaing becuase at low resolution with that card your gonna be hitting well over 100fps before the bottleneck kicks in anyhow.

What resolution do u use???

Lucky for you Core duo's are well known for overclocking ability.

See if you can overclock your CPU that will help greatly.

(PS. Although 2Gb ram is the sweetspot for XP an extra 2gig ram wouldnt hurt, although only 3.5Gb will be useable on 32bit)

@ SAINT 19.... Please be sure your advice is correct before giving it....you could have potentially cost this lad hundreds of $$$$$ for no reason at all!!!

October 4, 2009 1:34:54 AM

Forgot to add...

Your PCI-E 16x slot is more than enough for your card (i think even an AGP slot would have been suffice!!!)

Your RAM cannot be bottlenecking your card because the faster the RAM doesnt always mean the better performance. Running your RAM @ a perfect 1:1 ratio to your FSB often yields better results.

for example. If your FSB is 400MHz then ideally you would have 800MHz RAM (becuase its actually 400MHz x 2 as its double rate EFFECTIVELY giving you 800MHz)

So you have 667MHz RAM so your FSB ideally should be at 333MHz.
October 4, 2009 12:55:44 PM

thanks so much for the replies, i'm no good at overclocking gpu's/cpu's so i think ill pass on that as ill be ordering the parts very soon anyway... so when i get it all built up, ill do a 3d mark test for u guys, or something :) 
ill also do one now to compare the results, hehe
see ya around, and thanks again for the help, really appreciate it
October 4, 2009 3:39:09 PM

my desktop resolution is 1680x1050
gaming resolution is 1280x1024 in CoD4 atleast

anyhow i have another question...
i were reading info on the mobo im getting, it says "tripple channel memory" does this mean i need 3 sticks of RAM or will 2 be fine?
sorry for all the questions, it's just, not exactly cheap for the parts i am getting...
thanks again for any help :) 
October 4, 2009 6:28:27 PM

No-One said:
my desktop resolution is 1680x1050
gaming resolution is 1280x1024 in CoD4 atleast

anyhow i have another question...
i were reading info on the mobo im getting, it says "tripple channel memory" does this mean i need 3 sticks of RAM or will 2 be fine?
sorry for all the questions, it's just, not exactly cheap for the parts i am getting...
thanks again for any help :) 


Triple channel is a type of memory, it doesn't mean that you need a certain amount of sticks of RAM. In all honesty, the difference between dual- and triple-channel RAM is bandwidth; it won't effect your gaming, but has effects on productivity software like Adobe or CAD. You don't need to worry about it, triple-channel RAM just means you need DDR3 (usually). Check your MB to be sure.
October 4, 2009 6:44:14 PM

ah yeah i see... so as we're on the topic of RAM, as u can see this is what i've currently got in mind:
"4GB Corsair TwinX XMS3, DDR3 PC3-10666 (1333Mhz) Non-ECC Unbuffered"
however, the mobo is capable of 2000Mhz RAM, in OC "mode"?
is it worth spending more money for faster RAM or will it not make much difference?

thanks again in advance for any help, and sorry for all the questions, i just feel better to know more about the system :) 
October 4, 2009 6:55:56 PM

No-One said:
ah yeah i see... so as we're on the topic of RAM, as u can see this is what i've currently got in mind:
"4GB Corsair TwinX XMS3, DDR3 PC3-10666 (1333Mhz) Non-ECC Unbuffered"
however, the mobo is capable of 2000Mhz RAM, in OC "mode"?
is it worth spending more money for faster RAM or will it not make much difference?

thanks again in advance for any help, and sorry for all the questions, i just feel better to know more about the system :) 


No problem.
OC is, of course, overclock. RAM speed performance is, in reality, pointless. I've looked at dozens of reviews and each one remarks that from 1333mHz RAM to the high-end 2400mHz RAM, performance change is in the single-digit percents, in fact, even as low as percents of a percent. That will be fine RAM.
a b U Graphics card
October 4, 2009 6:57:16 PM

You don't have to buy an entirely new system if you're just gonna stick with the 4890.

I suggest you overclock your CPU to 3.0GHz or more. Then wait 1-2 years and upgrade when the prices have gone down.
a c 89 U Graphics card
October 4, 2009 6:57:24 PM

Quote:
Triple channel is a type of memory, it doesn't mean that you need a certain amount of sticks of RAM.
actually it is just the opposite, it is a type of bus thingie and it needs 3 or 6 ram sticks to work, there is no way to make 2 sticks to work in triple channel... and since X58 mobos are the only ones that support tripple channel and since they also only support DDR3 and not DDR2, you can't get DDR2 in tripple channel lol
but yeah, gaming wise it doesn't really matter if it is dual or tripple
October 4, 2009 7:23:37 PM

Overclockin them CPU's is pretty simple. Just up your FSB ....theyre pretty stable chips and will probs get a decent overclock without needin to adjust voltage.

If you see the computer become unstable (ie freeze, crash, artifacts) then up the voltage a step...its that simple.
October 4, 2009 7:25:11 PM

Not sure what the average Overclock is though on these CPU's maybe someone else can help....also if you do attemp dont push the voltage above 1.45V and monitor the chip temp... (although i do believe these chips run pretty cool anyhow)
October 4, 2009 8:14:56 PM

Kari said:
Quote:
Triple channel is a type of memory, it doesn't mean that you need a certain amount of sticks of RAM.
actually it is just the opposite, it is a type of bus thingie and it needs 3 or 6 ram sticks to work, there is no way to make 2 sticks to work in triple channel... and since X58 mobos are the only ones that support tripple channel and since they also only support DDR3 and not DDR2, you can't get DDR2 in tripple channel lol
but yeah, gaming wise it doesn't really matter if it is dual or tripple


I understand that, and perhaps I should have been clearer, but I'm saying that triple channel is only supported by i7, and that it is a specific function...yeah...bad wording...I know...
October 5, 2009 10:55:47 AM

well, i've been thinking, i might just go and OC the CPU, even though i'm not entirely sure on how to do it, but i'll have a look around...
leave it a month or so, then upgrade the mobo, cpu and ram...
most likely be the same parts as they are "decent" parts, but cheaper, ofc :) 
but then again, i might get newer parts in a months time, who knows...

but as u guys are wanting me to OC my CPU, then, i'll go with u guys and OC it, after reading some articles on how to do it, hehe...
is it as simple as increasing the FSB speed?
and in what increments do i do it in and how do i know when to "stop"?
i'll be reading CPU OC guides meanwhile... thanks again in advance :) 
October 5, 2009 8:24:19 PM

No-One said:
well, i've been thinking, i might just go and OC the CPU, even though i'm not entirely sure on how to do it, but i'll have a look around...
leave it a month or so, then upgrade the mobo, cpu and ram...
most likely be the same parts as they are "decent" parts, but cheaper, ofc :) 
but then again, i might get newer parts in a months time, who knows...

but as u guys are wanting me to OC my CPU, then, i'll go with u guys and OC it, after reading some articles on how to do it, hehe...
is it as simple as increasing the FSB speed?
and in what increments do i do it in and how do i know when to "stop"?
i'll be reading CPU OC guides meanwhile... thanks again in advance :) 


Sorry if I seem negatory, but overclocking is definitely not something "easy" to do. While there are dozens of guides out there for how to overclock, each with detailed steps, in reality, it is experience that matters. My first overclocking experience was with a low-end, easily replaceable CPU. I wouldn't recommend you do it with your main CPU unless you are willing to put hours into it. There are half a dozen voltage considerations, the clock, if it is unlocked, watching the RAM, etc. Also, it takes hours to test if an overclock is stable, though the quickest way is to boot up and see if you get blue-screened or if it freezes. For example, I was able to push an i7 920 to 3.8 gHz on the stock cooler before it started hitting temps of 93-94 celsius at load, and I lowered it to 3.2 until I installed an aftermarket cooler. There's a lot of variables, and, regardless of how good a guide is, experience is best.

Good luck!
!