Need any help possible!!!!

I woke up the other morning and my homebuilt system was off. I tried to turn it on and it shut down. I proceeded to troubleshoot it to try to figure out what was wrong. I currently have only the motherboard in the case, one memory DIMM in Slot 1, the graphic card in the slot, and the power supply attached. When I turn it on, the fans begin to turn, the LEDs on the motherboard light up, but then the fans stop and the computer turns off. I replaced the power supply with a new one and the same thing happened, so I am left to believe there is a problem with my CPU, graphics card, or motherboard. Is there any way to figure out which it might be so I can replace it or do I just need to start replacing parts until I get the right one. Any help at all would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Nick
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More about need possible
  1. Did you try clearing CMOS?
  2. Try checking the CPU heat-sink and/or reseating it. Then we can rule out any heat problems. Also please list your system spec's. :D
  3. Read the following which I have I written before, it should help you find the cause of the problem.
    ..................................................................................................................................................

    Firstly touch the metal case to remove any static that have build up in your body.

    Unplug the power Cable from the back of the Power supply. Also unplug keyboard, mouse, speaker cables.

    Reset the Motherboard, there should be a reset button(jumper) on Motherboard. Or simply take the battery out and put it back in. Refer to motherboard manual for further instructions.

    Carefully remove all parts from motherboard, leaving only the cpu and the fan. Then unplug all cables (i.e HD, DVD, case etc) connected to the motherboard except the Power supply cable and of course CPU fan.

    Now add the Graphics Card, make sure it sits on the slot properly.

    Now add just 1 Memory card in Slot 1. Make sure you insert it the right way. There's a guider at the bottom of card to help you, if you notice one side of metal connectors is longer than the other side. You should hear clicking sound once insert it properly. Now add the second Memory card in Slot 2. You can leave the third one till later.

    Now connect the main power cable to back of Power supply and connect the Monitor cable to the Graphics card. Make sure the monitor is switched On.

    Now is time to switch on the Motherboard, either by pressing the internal Power button located on MotherBoard or by locating the power Switch cable coming from the front of the Case and connecting it to the motherboard jumpers (it might be labelled PW or PWR).


    The screen should display the bios screen. If it does that means these parts are not the cause of the fault. If it doesn’t the go - Part 2

    Then what you do is Disconnect the power and add the parts one bye one to the system. Each time you add part or connect a cable, turn the system on to make sure it works.

    Basically this is one way to find what is causing a blank screen.

    ......................................................................................
    PART 2 (still have blank screen)
    ......................................................................................

    Unplug the power Cable from the back of the Power supply. Also unplug keyboard, mouse, speaker cables etc

    Carefully remove all parts from motherboard, leaving only the cpu, the fan. Then unplug all cables connected to the motherboard.

    Very carefully unscrew motherboard and take it out from the case. Place it on top of the Motherboard box, with the anti static bag underneath it.

    Now add memory to slot 1 and 2 as before. remember it must click when insert it. Next add the Graphics Card, make sure it sits on the slot properly.

    Now connect the power cables from the power supply to the motherboard.

    Now connect the main power cable to back of Power supply and connect the Monitor cable to the Graphics card. Make sure the monitor is switched On.

    Now is time to switch on the Motherboard, either by pressing the internal Power button located on Motherboard or by making a metal contact to motherboard Power jumpers (it might be labelled PW or PWR).

    The screen should display the bios screen. If it does that means these party are not the cause of the fault, it could be that you did not install Motherboard to case properly.


    However if the fault still exist, it means it could CPU, Graphics card, Memory or Motherboard that is causing the fault.

    .............................................................................................................
    Part three (remember to connect the Case's speaker cable to motherboard to hear these beebs)
    .............................................................................................................


    When an IBM compatible computer is first turned on, the hardware runs a Power-On Self Test (POST). If errors are encountered during this POST test, they are usually displayed via an audio beep or in the form of a code number flashed across the screen. With this audio code in hand, you can determine what part of the system is having problems and find a solution.

    The pattern of beeps whether its the number of beeps or the length of those beeps will give you an indication of the actual problem. Its a distress signal from the computer in a morse code like pattern. Unless you have a diagnostic card to tell you more about the particular problem, you will have to use the charts to decipher the computer error and get your machine back up and running.


    This following gives troubleshooting tips for when you hear beep codes and your desktop board does not boot up successfully. (source Inte.coml)


    You are getting 1, 2, or 3 beeps that indicate a memory failure.

    1 beep - Refresh Error (with nothing on the screen and it is not a video problem)

    2 beeps - Parity Error

    3 beeps - Base 64 K memory failure
    Reseat the memory.
    Make sure that the contacts on the memory and the socket are clean.
    Try removing one bank of memory modules at a time. Note: Some systems might need to have a memory module in Bank 0.
    Try using memory modules from the same manufacturer with the same part number and speed.
    Check for a faulty memory module by trying the memory in a known good system.
    Trying known good memory in the system.
    Check the power supply and check for power fluctuations.
    If the steps above do not resolve the problem, the desktop board may be defective. Try a different desktop board.


    You are getting 4 beeps indicating a timer not operational:
    Check for foreign objects such as screws that may ground the desktop board and make sure that screws that hold the motherboard are not too tight.
    Try a different desktop board.


    You are getting 5 beeps indicating a processor error:
    Check for foreign objects such as screws that may ground the desktop board and make sure the screws that hold the board are not too tight.
    Make sure the processor is seated properly.
    Try a different processor.
    Remove the desktop board from the chassis and reinstall it.
    If the steps above do not resolve the problem, the desktop board may be defective. Try a different desktop board.


    You are getting 6 beeps indicating 8042 - gate A20 failure:
    Check for foreign objects such as screws that may ground the desktop board and make sure the screws that hold the motherboard are not too tight.
    Try a different keyboard.
    Try a different processor.


    You are getting 7 beeps indicating processor exception interrupt error
    Make sure the processor is seated properly.
    Try a different processor.
    Try a different desktop board.


    You are getting 8 beeps indicating display memory read/write failure
    Make sure that you have a video card on your system.
    If possible, swap the memory on the video card.
    Try a different video card.
    Try a different desktop board.

    You are getting 9 beeps indicating ROM checksum error
    Try reflashing the system BIOS.
    If possible, try reseating the system BIOS chip.
    Try a different desktop board.


    You are getting 10 beeps indicating CMOS shutdown register read/write error
    Try a different desktop board.


    You are getting 11 beeps indicating cache memory bad
    Make sure the system is configured properly (CMOS Setup Program and jumpers on the board) for the RAM cache.
    If possible, replace the RAM cache.
    Try a different processor.
    Try a different desktop board.
  4. Thanks for the timely replies! I have cleared the CMOS (twice), I have the manufacturer's fan attached to the CPU, but do not think it is heat related ( I keep the room it is in very cool), and I have tried step one of ibsina's steps. Additionally, I do not get any beeps on startup, I do not know if this is something I didn't add when I built the system or not. The computer as it is now is an Abit KN8-SLI motherboard with an AMD Opteron 165 processor with fan, two DIMMS of 512 MB OCZ memory and an EVGA 7600 SLI graphics card powered by an Enermax 535 Watt power supply. Thanks again, Nick
  5. A quick shutdown is normally caused by one of three things:

    1) A case short during assembly. Since you PC was running, and since I assume you did not throw paper clips into it, this is a low probability.

    2) PSU: MOST of the time, the psu is the culprit. But you have tried two psus. For the record, what is the make/model of the second psu, and have you proven that either of these PSUs is NOW in working condition?

    3) Heat: If your cpu heatsink fan does not turn on, or if your heatsink is not installed properly (or has popped loose), your PC will shut down quickly. After PSU failure, this is the most likely cause of your problem. It has NOTHING to do with how cool your room is.
  6. The second PSU was a brand new one I bought just to test it out. It is an "a Power" 480 watt. So do I just uninstall the CPU fan and reseat it?
  7. No, you uninstall the heat sink, check the thermal paste, and re-seat it.

    You did build this, right?
  8. Yes, but this is the first system I have ever built and the reason I am here looking for help.
  9. No that's all good everyone starts on there first... ;) You will need to uninstall the Heat-sink from the M/B and check the contact patch. Look to see if it is a nice consistent spread. If so reinstall with new paste. Put a small rice size drop in the center of the CPU and then set the heat-sink on the CPU. give it a little twist back and forth and then remount. If there is not a consistent look to it do the same as i said to reinstall the heat-sink. Be sure to tighten are press the pins into the M/B in a X pattern. :) Let us know how that goes. This may not solve the problem but is a good starting point. We can move on from here.
  10. Can you give me your system spec's? (M/B, CPU, GPU, And Memory and so.)
  11. O and relax we will get it.
  12. AGirlsBuild, my system is an Abit KN8-SLI motherboard with an AMD Opteron 165 processor with fan, two DIMMS of 512 MB OCZ memory and an EVGA 7600 SLI graphics card powered by an Enermax 535 Watt power supply. I will try to relax it just seemed 2Boxer was getting on me. Thanks again, Nick
  13. OK. Very excitedly tried the thermal paste, powered on the computer and it still shut down right away. So for no real reason I sit here and look at my motherboard. The Abit KN8-SLI comes with a "Shadowcard" that it requires to be installed in the second graphic card slot if you only have one installed. So I take it out and have no graphic card or shadowcard installed. Power it up and the fans keep spinning. So I leave the shadowcard out, put my graphic card back in and it keeps going. I am going to reconnect the hard drive and see what I get.
  14. With just the graphics card in, I get nothing but the fans spinning and the hard drives making noises, so I know its working, but I am not getting a display on my monitor. If I install the "shadowcard" the computer will not startup. Is the "Shadowcard" the problem? What is it anyway? Ideas??
  15. [Edit: written before you posted.]
    Learn something every day lol. Early SLI, some mobo makers took 16 PCIe lines and split them 8-8 to two PCIe slots. If you ran SLI - ie, two cards - you were fine. If you only ran one, you would have only 8 lines.

    The shadowcard apparently redirects the 8 lines from the second PCIe slot BACK to Slot #1 to give 16 lines for max one-card throughput.

    Soooo, the system should boot fine with 1xVidcard + 0xShadowcard . . . just run "slower" video. I tried to download your mobo's manual to verify, but I couldn't connect to any of the three mirror sites.

    If the PC works without the Shadowcard, but doesn't work with it . . . I'd normally say look for some kind of physical damage to the card or Slot#2 or to the mobo itself. But this PC had been running . . . maybe the Shadowcard got jostled, misaligned in its slot?
  16. Its weird, I took it out and back in twice just to verify and cannot get it to start with it in. With it out I get nothing on my monitor, but the fans keep spinning. I appreciate the continued help. Thanks, Nick
  17. Is there another PC around that you can try your vid card in?
  18. No, my other system is so old it only has AGP slots!!
  19. Bah!

    To recap, we started with 4 main candidates:

    PSU: Normally most likely, but you tried two different ones with same result.

    Heat: No time for heat to build up. So unless the heatsink fan is unplugged, or the heatsink is very badly (re-)installed, this is very unlikely.

    VidCard Death: Could be. The system behaves worse, is in more trouble, when the Shadowcard redirects 8 lines back to slot #1.

    Mobo: Mobos are tough little beasts, once working. But this one is older.

    Well, maybe there's a fifth culprit: Did you ever try running with just the other stick of memory?
  20. No, I suppose I could try that. Have to wait for tomorrow though. Thanks and night all. Nick
  21. A present for when you wake up . . . you have another PC . . . and I know this is a pita . . . but if we can verify that your psu is OK, we can focus on the other suspects.

    Can you try running your old PC with your Enermax psu? If that fails, try your . . . what was it . . . aPower.
  22. Still no dice!! The power supplies both work on my other system. If I leave the shadowcard in with either memory stick the computer still will not start. If I have the shadowcard out, the computer runs, but my monitor shows "no input signal".
  23. Nick, it looks like its mobo or vid card. Personally I lean toward the mobo because your system shut down, but your psu is now known working.

    I don't know where else to take the diagnosis except try the vid card in someone else's system.
  24. I found someone who will put the video card in their system and check it out for me. If it works in their system, I guess I need a new mobo, if not, I need a new video card. I'll check it out tomorrow and let you know what I find out. I am greatly appreciative of your time and help. Thanks, Nick
  25. No problem, Nick - sorry it took so long.

    Good luck.
  26. Well, I put the graphic card in the other system and it boots up fine. I have come to the conclusion that either the shadocard is bad or the motherboard. I have been trying to contact the motherboard manufacturer (Abit) since last Thursday (on hold three times for one hour each before giving up, and two e-mails sent to tech support with no answer) to find out how I can replace either one or both with no help!!!
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