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Should I install an aftermarket CPU cooler?

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November 28, 2009 8:00:53 PM

A few months back when I was buying the components for my PC, I bought an aftermarket cooler. I had some problems with the PC which required that I RMA two products. When I was putting the PC back together I used the stock cooler instead of the aftermarket one I had bought.

Now, I'm interested in overclocking a bit, and have even done some minor overclocking. The cooler is just sitting in another room, and it's brand new.

With the overclocking I have done, my temperatures at idle aren't very high, around 35 degrees Celsius. I OC'd from 3.1 to 3.5 GHz

My cooler is Thermaltake CLP0539 120mm Hydro Dynamic Fan
My CPU is AMD Phenom II X2 550 Black Edition

Now, would it be a wise idea for me to switch to that cooler, or keep using the stock?
Also, I'd rather not hear things about how overclocking is an idiotic idea.

Please excuse the irritating way that I type, with sentences broken up and all of that
a b à CPUs
November 28, 2009 9:08:45 PM

You write fine

If you are planning to Overclock a lot like 300 mhz and up then go ahead with the Aftermarket cooler, and no Overclocking isn't a dumb idea it is a way to get more for less.
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November 28, 2009 9:12:47 PM

Upendra09 said:
You write fine

If you are planning to Overclock a lot like 300 mhz and up then go ahead with the Aftermarket cooler, and no Overclocking isn't a dumb idea it is a way to get more for less.


I'm also considering unlocking the two cores on the CPU if I can. I'm not sure if these ones are faulty or not. I know that would put out quite a bit of heat.
I've also read about how people have gotten this CPU up to 3.9 ghz stable and am interested in attempting that.
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November 28, 2009 9:26:25 PM

In that case definitely put the after market cooler on
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a b K Overclocking
November 29, 2009 12:53:17 AM

id definetly say you should use the aftermarket cooler.

if you have one already, theres no reason not to use it.

i have that same processor, i was able to OC up to 3.92ghz, but have no unlocked it to a quad core and run it at 3.4ghz. thats with a tuniq tower 120 HSF.

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a b K Overclocking
November 29, 2009 12:54:06 AM

that should have been *'have now unlocked'.

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a b à CPUs
November 29, 2009 1:12:00 AM

i like aftermarket coolers anyway because my room gets very warm even in the winter time (bad heat pipe installations). i get around 58 degrees sometimes on 3.8 with stock voltage :( !
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a b K Overclocking
November 29, 2009 1:28:31 AM

same. im in new zealand, and thanks to the big window in my room it gets like a greenhouse. my temps are way above average. but with a well ventilated case and good HSF, tenps stay under control.

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a b K Overclocking
November 29, 2009 2:42:02 AM

My strategy is to ditch the stock cooler if I'm planning any overclocking, and I'm ALWAYS planning to overclock. Not only that I've used the Xig 1283 cooler and I like it so I'm planning to use it even though a less expensive cooler might work for me.
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a c 197 K Overclocking
November 29, 2009 2:42:09 AM

Yes, if you have the aftermarket cooler, go ahead and use it.

It looks like an HDT (Heatpipe Direct Touch) style cooler. HDT coolers sort of require a different approach to apply thermal compound:
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
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a b K Overclocking
November 29, 2009 2:43:40 AM

I responded too fast, I intended to add this-

The question about whether you should or should not change coolers is ultimately a matter of the temps that you get under your conditions. If your temps are OK with the stock cooler, then you could justify staying with the stock cooler.
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November 29, 2009 5:19:40 AM

jsc said:
Yes, if you have the aftermarket cooler, go ahead and use it.

It looks like an HDT (Heatpipe Direct Touch) style cooler. HDT coolers sort of require a different approach to apply thermal compound:
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

Well, the heatpipes touch a small copper plate, but they're both made of copper, and I believe I read somewhere it was an HDT cooler.

Thanks for the link.
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a b K Overclocking
November 29, 2009 5:46:04 AM

@cadder, i actually disagree.

even if temps are 'fine' with stock cooler, they will still be lower with an aftermarket cooler (assuming it does its job well enough).

a cooler CPU not only has a longer life span, but operates more efficently and consumes less power (though im pretty sure its such marginal ammounts that its no noticeable)

if you have an aftermarket cooler, id say you should always use it. since it will extend your CPUs lifespan.
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