Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

After resetting CMOS What Next???

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
February 25, 2010 11:56:44 PM

I got my computer to boot up again. I cleared my cmos by taking out the cmos battery. But now when i boot up, it ask me if i want to start safe mode or start computer normally. I have tried both of them and both of them only boot up halfway and then a blue screen came up with list of texts( i was unable to read because it quickly and automatically reboot again). Now i go back to the same process again and again. Is there anything I suppose to do in my BIOS after resetting CMOS??

More about : resetting cmos

a b V Motherboard
February 26, 2010 12:35:31 AM

Since you've reset the BIOS, I would suspect a BIOS setting.

It could also be a damaged hard drive. Do you have a windows disc? You could try booting off that disc and doing a repair.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
February 26, 2010 1:51:35 AM

What was the original problem? Why did you have to reset the CMOS in the first place?
m
0
l
Related resources
February 26, 2010 4:56:43 AM

EXT64 said:
What was the original problem? Why did you have to reset the CMOS in the first place?

BEcause at first i cant boot up my computer but after i rest the cmos it works again. But i face a new problem. So what do you think the problem is?
Maybe an update for the BIOS or reflash the BIOS??
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
February 26, 2010 10:42:33 AM

Something may have gotten corrupted, you could try a repair

Try downloading and running memtest86+ 4 (it is bootable on either a Pen drive or CD) and see if that can pass successfully.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
February 26, 2010 10:43:50 AM

I am still somewhat confused on one thing: this is an existing build that was working and then stopped booting one day, correct?
m
0
l
February 26, 2010 6:00:45 PM

EXT64 said:
I am still somewhat confused on one thing: this is an existing build that was working and then stopped booting one day, correct?

yes it was working normally until one day it just cant boot up and i decided to clear my cmos. this makes it boot up again but never make it all he way to the desktop. i mean it didnt even show me the part where it said windows xp is starting.
m
0
l
a c 111 V Motherboard
February 26, 2010 6:24:00 PM

The Blue Screen Of Death (BSOD) can tell you what Windows thinks the problem is. There should be an error message above the text you mentioned seeing. Generally the paragraph text tells you that if you changed any software or hardware lately, those said changes can be the culprit.

If you want to try to get the computer to stop rebooting at the BSOD so you can read it, use the advanced boot menu. To get to the advanced menu I speak of, repeatedly press F8 after POST (if you can get that far). At the menu, use the down arrow to highlight "Reboot after boot failure" (or something like that), and then press enter to stop the reboots. Your computer will restart again, but when it tries to load Windows and fails, it should stop at the BSOD.

I understand you said that this was a previously working system, and since you didn't mention any changes, i'm assuming you didn't. That being said, I concur with aford10 and the damage hard drive theory. Have you noticed the computer being slower lately (when it was loading Windows)? Have you recently scanned your system for viruses or spyware?
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
February 26, 2010 8:35:22 PM

There are 2 likely causes of the reboot loop, the hard drive or RAM. It could also be a BIOS setting, but lets concentrate on these 2 for now.

Try disconnecting the hard drive, and power on the system. If it stalls at a BIOS message saying, 'boot failure, insert system disk and press enter,' then your RAM is likely fine, as it's successfully POSTed.

If that's the case, concentrate on the hard drive. Try doing a windows repair with your OS disc.
m
0
l
February 27, 2010 4:07:40 AM

T_T said:
The Blue Screen Of Death (BSOD) can tell you what Windows thinks the problem is. There should be an error message above the text you mentioned seeing. Generally the paragraph text tells you that if you changed any software or hardware lately, those said changes can be the culprit.

If you want to try to get the computer to stop rebooting at the BSOD so you can read it, use the advanced boot menu. To get to the advanced menu I speak of, repeatedly press F8 after POST (if you can get that far). At the menu, use the down arrow to highlight "Reboot after boot failure" (or something like that), and then press enter to stop the reboots. Your computer will restart again, but when it tries to load Windows and fails, it should stop at the BSOD.

I understand you said that this was a previously working system, and since you didn't mention any changes, i'm assuming you didn't. That being said, I concur with aford10 and the damage hard drive theory. Have you noticed the computer being slower lately (when it was loading Windows)? Have you recently scanned your system for viruses or spyware?


One thing i did is i reset my cmos after that, it didnt start up anymore. I have two hard disk in my computer, so do i have to configure my bios to tell my computer that?
m
0
l
a c 111 V Motherboard
February 27, 2010 9:14:47 AM

Usually you don't, but it won't hurt to check that both are recognized by your BIOS when both are connected. However, even if BIOS sees both drives, remove the slave drive to see if one of your hard drives are failing internally.
m
0
l
February 27, 2010 5:27:02 PM

aford10 said:
There are 2 likely causes of the reboot loop, the hard drive or RAM. It could also be a BIOS setting, but lets concentrate on these 2 for now.

Try disconnecting the hard drive, and power on the system. If it stalls at a BIOS message saying, 'boot failure, insert system disk and press enter,' then your RAM is likely fine, as it's successfully POSTed.

If that's the case, concentrate on the hard drive. Try doing a windows repair with your OS disc.

What do you mean by power on the system? The power supply or the cmos battery?
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
February 27, 2010 5:48:07 PM

I mean, turn on the computer.
m
0
l
!