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SSD Caching with Z68 motherboard

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  • SSD
  • Cache
  • Software
  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
July 4, 2011 4:34:28 PM

A few questions on software, installation, re-installation/backup of software:

Its recently come to my attention that SSD caching can actually be really useful and provide a noticeable performance increase without applying too much cost.

The biggest size SSD caching can support is a 60GB SSD. So id be buying something like: OCZ 60GB Agility 3 SSD http://www.ebuyer.com/product/268239. I already have a ASUS P8Z68-v Pro Motherboard so it would be paired with that and my 1TB 7200rpm Baraccuda HDD 32MB cache.

Gigabyte has a fantastic tool for SSD caching that involves no moving of folder or files, no formatting, it just works with a few clicks and its up and running. I understand this tool is specific to Gigabyte and cant be used with my ASUS board. So how would i go about installing an SSD? Is there any alternative software that i can use that does what gigabyte's does?

I no longer have a Windows Install disk and i really dont want to lose any files when i add an SSD drive. If i install an SSD would i need a new OS? Would i lose my files? Or can i just create a system restore disk, backup my files to an external HDD and then once the SSD is installed i can use the system restore disk and then grab all my files back off a external HDD?

Basically im really confused on how the whole system works. If anyone could provide any guideance it would be much appreciated.

Thanks.

More about : ssd caching z68 motherboard

a b G Storage
July 5, 2011 1:10:48 AM

Here's an article on installing intel's SRT. It's not gigabyte dependant. It's z68 dependant.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Intel-Smart-Resp...

The nice thing about it is the ssd is just a cache and, therefore, your file system and everything else stays the same. You can 'break' the cache apart and have a separate ssd in future if you choose to. Sounds easy. Good luck.
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July 5, 2011 8:15:59 AM

This method requires windows to be re-installed which i was really trying to avoid.

If i need to re-install windows wont i need a new windows disk and product key?

If i dont need a new disk and product key how do i go about this?
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a b G Storage
July 5, 2011 4:06:59 PM

To change to RAID mode from AHCI you shouldn't need to reinstall win7. As far as I know the msahci command in your registry has only two selections. IDE or not. If you are in AHCI mode you should be able to change your bios to RAID mode and reboot. Try it. If no go, switch it back.

Even if you are in IDE mode you can simply switch the toggle in your registry and reboot your computer. During the reboot you select RAID and it should boot properly.

Please make two copies of a trusted backup before playing as it WILL save your butt one day.
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July 5, 2011 4:50:34 PM

Best answer selected by AdrianPerry.
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August 25, 2016 3:02:16 PM

adampower said:
To change to RAID mode from AHCI you shouldn't need to reinstall win7. As far as I know the msahci command in your registry has only two selections. IDE or not. If you are in AHCI mode you should be able to change your bios to RAID mode and reboot. Try it. If no go, switch it back.

Even if you are in IDE mode you can simply switch the toggle in your registry and reboot your computer. During the reboot you select RAID and it should boot properly.

Please make two copies of a trusted backup before playing as it WILL save your butt one day.


First I apologize for reviving such an old topic, but the answer posted best was incomplete at most and left out an alternative when this doesn't work.

This does not work for some controllers. After switching the registry Win7 may still stop on the 0x07B bluescreen. In that case you want to switch the bios to raid IDE mode, which will make windows ask for the raid driver, then once you feed it that and reboot, you can go into bios and switch IDE to plain RAID, "IF" your bios has this flexibility, but certainly it would still be safest to have a back copy of the OS, even if you never try to switch controller modes, just for everyday computing backup purposes.

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