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4gb ddr2-800 dual-channel vs 6gb ddr2-1066 single-channel

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February 27, 2010 12:34:55 PM

hi guys !!!

my build is :

Intel Core2Quad Q9550 2.83GHz / 12MB cache / 1333 bus + OCZ Vendetta 2
ASUS P5Q PRO - P45
SAPPHIRE HD 4890 TOXIC 1GB GDDR5
2 x Kingston 2GB DDR2-800 dual channel
Western Digital Green 640GB AACS 16M Cache SATAII
Hec Cougar 750w

now as you see i am working on dual channel ram mode with 4gb , i am thinking about get a 3*2gb ddr2-1066 but it will works on single channel mode !!

i want ti know what would be better .... 4gb-800 dual or 6gb-1066 single ??

my pc is used for CAD and gaming as well , and i NEVER overclock !!!!

note: i tried to use 4*2gb ddr2-1066 to have total ram of 8gb with dual-channel but i had all problems i can get , my mobo is a crap when all ram slots are used

waiting for your advices !! :)  :) 


February 27, 2010 12:41:49 PM

i want to add another thing

i can also upgrade to 2*2gb ddr2-1066 dual channel

so ... what is better 4gb-800 dual , 4gb-1066 dual or 6gb-1066 single ??
February 28, 2010 12:15:30 PM

any help ??!!
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March 2, 2010 12:48:42 PM

?????
a b } Memory
March 2, 2010 5:29:56 PM

The straight forward answer is 4GB DC > 6GB SC.

And now to elaborate...

Dual-channel technology was created to address the issue of bottlenecks. Increased processor speed and performance requires other, less prominent components to keep pace. In the case of dual channel design, the intended target is the memory controller, which regulates data flow between the CPU and system memory (RAM). The memory controller determines the types and speeds of RAM as well as the maximum size of each individual memory module and the overall memory capacity of the system. However, when the memory is unable to keep up with the processor, a bottleneck occurs, leaving the CPU with nothing to process. Under the single-channel architecture, any CPU with a bus speed greater than the memory speed would be susceptible to this bottleneck effect.
The dual-channel configuration alleviates the problem by doubling the amount of available memory bandwidth. Instead of a single memory channel, a second parallel channel is added. With two channels working simultaneously, the bottleneck is reduced. Rather than wait for memory technology to improve, dual-channel architecture simply takes the existing RAM technology and improves the method in which it is handled. While the actual implementation differs between Intel and AMD motherboards, the basic theory stands.


And now to complicate it...

Although your motherboard is designed to support dual channel architecture, installing unmatched pairs of RAM will force you into using the highest latency, the lowest speed, and should be operated at the higher voltage of the pair. Furthermore, the motherboard will automatically map the higher capacity RAM into dual channel and any remaining RAM will be automatically mapped to single channel.

What this means for your RAM combo is 2 x 2GB (4GB DC) or 2 x 2GB + 2 x 1GB (SC), this you already know. As stated above, due to memory mapping, the mobo will use all available RAM, but unmatched pairs will be forced into single channel.
March 3, 2010 1:36:53 AM

T_T said:
The straight forward answer is 4GB DC > 6GB SC.

And now to elaborate...

Dual-channel technology was created to address the issue of bottlenecks. Increased processor speed and performance requires other, less prominent components to keep pace. In the case of dual channel design, the intended target is the memory controller, which regulates data flow between the CPU and system memory (RAM). The memory controller determines the types and speeds of RAM as well as the maximum size of each individual memory module and the overall memory capacity of the system. However, when the memory is unable to keep up with the processor, a bottleneck occurs, leaving the CPU with nothing to process. Under the single-channel architecture, any CPU with a bus speed greater than the memory speed would be susceptible to this bottleneck effect.
The dual-channel configuration alleviates the problem by doubling the amount of available memory bandwidth. Instead of a single memory channel, a second parallel channel is added. With two channels working simultaneously, the bottleneck is reduced. Rather than wait for memory technology to improve, dual-channel architecture simply takes the existing RAM technology and improves the method in which it is handled. While the actual implementation differs between Intel and AMD motherboards, the basic theory stands.


And now to complicate it...

Although your motherboard is designed to support dual channel architecture, installing unmatched pairs of RAM will force you into using the highest latency, the lowest speed, and should be operated at the higher voltage of the pair. Furthermore, the motherboard will automatically map the higher capacity RAM into dual channel and any remaining RAM will be automatically mapped to single channel.

What this means for your RAM combo is 2 x 2GB (4GB DC) or 2 x 2GB + 2 x 1GB (SC), this you already know. As stated above, due to memory mapping, the mobo will use all available RAM, but unmatched pairs will be forced into single channel.


thank you very much !!!!
!