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Bad Pool Header BSOD when I look into Tivo subdirectory

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Anonymous
May 24, 2005 3:39:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

While using Tivo desktop, I was transfering films to my hardrive, when I
decided to look at the subdirectory they were being put into. When I
open with Windows Explorer the subdirectory (MyTivodocuments) I
immediately get the blue screen of death (BSOD) with Bad Pool Header.
I ran defrag and chkdsk. Tried it again. BSOD.

Any suggestions?

DAve
Anonymous
May 24, 2005 3:50:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

DAve Allison wrote:
> While using Tivo desktop, I was transfering films to my hardrive, when I
> decided to look at the subdirectory they were being put into. When I
> open with Windows Explorer the subdirectory (MyTivodocuments) I
> immediately get the blue screen of death (BSOD) with Bad Pool Header.
> I ran defrag and chkdsk. Tried it again. BSOD.
>
> Any suggestions?
>
> DAve

A bad pool header error is unusual and pretty hard to diagnose. It
usually traces back to a bad driver or bad hardware. Start here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/libr...

then continue to diagnose using the driver verifier tool and/or use
special pool tagging. These are pretty advanced level tools.

I'll attach a good related post below

Randy S.

------------------------------

You've got pool corruption of some sort.

This is either a badly behaving driver or possibly a hardware failure.
In the absense of any other types of dumps you can probably lean towards
driver problems for starters.

You probably need someone to analyze this dump for you Pool corruption
is one of the harder memory dumps to read so a Microsoft CPR escalation
engineer may be needed. Since this would involve a $245 paid incident
you may want to start with some of the basics to troubleshoot this instead.

First, be sure your BIOS and drivers for *everything* are up to the
latest versions available. This includes not just video and sound, but
NIC drivers, chipset drivers, anything.

Next, you'll want to enable driver verifier and special pool tagging.
Driver verifier, to put it simply, will be very strict with drivers as
they load. If one misbehaves it will immediately crash with a much more
informative explanation about what failed. If, after enabling verifier,
you crash with a particular driver as the culprit, replace that driver.
Special pool tagging will cause a special tag to be placed at the end of
pool allocations. It is illegal to touch these tags so if a misbehaving
driver goes to corrupt something there is a chance it may touch a tag
and cause a crash. If this happens you'll get an immediate pointer to
the likely culprit.

If you get a CPR engineer from MS, he'll likely have you complete these
steps right away. It puts more information in the memory dump that makes
it possible to troubleshoot (nearly impossible to debug pool corruption
without).

Troubleshooting this successfully on your own is going to take a LOT of
luck. Let's hope updating drivers does the trick. Here is how to enable
driver verifier:

1. From a command line, run "Verifier /flags 9 /all"
2. Reboot for changes to take effect.
3. Do NOT log in right away. There is a chance you'll have a crash as a
faulty driver starts. If this happens, boot with last known good and it
will undo your change. Once you log on, last known good is GONE so if
you then crash you are stuck in a crash loop (tough to dig out from, but
possible).
4. Once you wait a few minutes for all automatic services to start (say
5 min first time) go ahead a log in. Run as normal and hopefully the
next crash will give a better indication of what's bombing.
5. If you no longer want driver verifier, run "Verifier /reset" to turn
it off, reboot.

For special pool tagging, simply make the following registry changes and
reboot to take effect.
To enable special pool tagging:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;188831

Additional info for ya:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;244617

I hope this helps. Reading a dump with pool corruption is well above my
head I'm afraid.
Anonymous
May 25, 2005 5:27:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

thanks, Randy.
More information. While I was transfering movies from my wireless TIVO,
I opened the subdirectory, which blew things as I outlined earlier.
I ended up uninstalling TIVO Desktop 2.1, run defrag and chkdsk /f. When
nothing else worked, I opened windows explorer and right clickedthe
subdirectory (instead of viewing it with a left click) and deleted the
whole thing.
Then reinstalled TIVO Desktop 2.1 and all is well. Guess I'll never
know. thanks for your assist.
DAve


Randy S. wrote:
> DAve Allison wrote:
>
>> While using Tivo desktop, I was transfering films to my hardrive, when
>> I decided to look at the subdirectory they were being put into. When I
>> open with Windows Explorer the subdirectory (MyTivodocuments) I
>> immediately get the blue screen of death (BSOD) with Bad Pool Header.
>> I ran defrag and chkdsk. Tried it again. BSOD.
>>
>> Any suggestions?
>>
>> DAve
>
>
> A bad pool header error is unusual and pretty hard to diagnose. It
> usually traces back to a bad driver or bad hardware. Start here:
>
> http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/libr...
>
>
> then continue to diagnose using the driver verifier tool and/or use
> special pool tagging. These are pretty advanced level tools.
>
> I'll attach a good related post below
>
> Randy S.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> You've got pool corruption of some sort.
>
> This is either a badly behaving driver or possibly a hardware failure.
> In the absense of any other types of dumps you can probably lean towards
> driver problems for starters.
>
> You probably need someone to analyze this dump for you Pool corruption
> is one of the harder memory dumps to read so a Microsoft CPR escalation
> engineer may be needed. Since this would involve a $245 paid incident
> you may want to start with some of the basics to troubleshoot this instead.
>
> First, be sure your BIOS and drivers for *everything* are up to the
> latest versions available. This includes not just video and sound, but
> NIC drivers, chipset drivers, anything.
>
> Next, you'll want to enable driver verifier and special pool tagging.
> Driver verifier, to put it simply, will be very strict with drivers as
> they load. If one misbehaves it will immediately crash with a much more
> informative explanation about what failed. If, after enabling verifier,
> you crash with a particular driver as the culprit, replace that driver.
> Special pool tagging will cause a special tag to be placed at the end of
> pool allocations. It is illegal to touch these tags so if a misbehaving
> driver goes to corrupt something there is a chance it may touch a tag
> and cause a crash. If this happens you'll get an immediate pointer to
> the likely culprit.
>
> If you get a CPR engineer from MS, he'll likely have you complete these
> steps right away. It puts more information in the memory dump that makes
> it possible to troubleshoot (nearly impossible to debug pool corruption
> without).
>
> Troubleshooting this successfully on your own is going to take a LOT of
> luck. Let's hope updating drivers does the trick. Here is how to enable
> driver verifier:
>
> 1. From a command line, run "Verifier /flags 9 /all"
> 2. Reboot for changes to take effect.
> 3. Do NOT log in right away. There is a chance you'll have a crash as a
> faulty driver starts. If this happens, boot with last known good and it
> will undo your change. Once you log on, last known good is GONE so if
> you then crash you are stuck in a crash loop (tough to dig out from, but
> possible).
> 4. Once you wait a few minutes for all automatic services to start (say
> 5 min first time) go ahead a log in. Run as normal and hopefully the
> next crash will give a better indication of what's bombing.
> 5. If you no longer want driver verifier, run "Verifier /reset" to turn
> it off, reboot.
>
> For special pool tagging, simply make the following registry changes and
> reboot to take effect.
> To enable special pool tagging:
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;188831
>
> Additional info for ya:
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;244617
>
> I hope this helps. Reading a dump with pool corruption is well above my
> head I'm afraid.
Anonymous
May 25, 2005 6:01:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

DAve Allison wrote:
> thanks, Randy.
> More information. While I was transfering movies from my wireless TIVO,
> I opened the subdirectory, which blew things as I outlined earlier.
> I ended up uninstalling TIVO Desktop 2.1, run defrag and chkdsk /f. When
> nothing else worked, I opened windows explorer and right clickedthe
> subdirectory (instead of viewing it with a left click) and deleted the
> whole thing.
> Then reinstalled TIVO Desktop 2.1 and all is well. Guess I'll never
> know. thanks for your assist.
> DAve

Sounds like Windows screwed something up when it created the directory
in the first place. Seems like you did the correct thing.

Randy S.
!