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Cannot Decide!! 1156 or 1366 Chipset??

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December 2, 2009 2:30:47 AM

Right now, I am having the most troubles on deciding my new system. If I was to go with the 1156 chipset, I would be buying the Intel core i7 860 and if I was to go with the 1366 chipset I would be buying the Intel Core i7 920

At first I thought I would go with the 1366 chipset for sure, because benchmarks are saying that the 1366 performs better. Also, when the core i9 comes out, it has been confirmed that the 1366 chipset would be used. I also believe that the xeon processor uses the 1366 chipset, if was to ever go down that path. So here there is evidence that the 1366 chipset would excel in future upgradebility.
The problem here is the cost. Price is a big issue, but since this is a PC upgrade, I don't want to be skimping on anything.
If I was to go with the 1366 chipset, I woud probably be going with budget components on everything, where as with the 1156 chipset I could save some cash even when going with top-of-the-line products.

With the Core i7 860 processor, I believe the one thing it is missing from the Nehalem CPU is hyper threading. If not that, than something, please confirm for me. In any case, it is missing something, and I can't decide if that something is going to matter to me. I am by no means the biggest power user on earth, but I still want to be able to run the things I do do at top notch performance.

So you see my debate. I could go with the Gigabyte P55 UD6 motherboard for $250, 8GB's of G.Skill Ripjaw DDR3 1600 RAM with 7-8-7-24 timings for under $200, and of course the Core i7 860 CPU for roughly $300. This is all Canadian pricing.
Now the 1366 system would probably consist of either the ASRock X58 Extreme or the Asus P6t SE as a mobo, 6GB's of OCZ DDR3 1600 RAM at slower timings. This would all end up being roughly $100 more than my 1156 setup, yet I am getting top of the line products on my 1156 system, and the value products of the 1366 family.
What I need to know is if this performance drop in the 1156 Core i7 860 processor as compared to the Core i7 920 is worth me sacrificing the legendary GA-P55 UD6 mobo and 8GB's of G.Skill Ripjaw DDR3 1600 RAM.

I have also heard that triple channel RAM is faster than dual channel, so even though I am getting 2GB's more RAM, at faster timings with the dual channel, would 6GB's of tripple channel (minus the better timings) memory perform better?

Any help is appreciated!

More about : decide 1156 1366 chipset

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December 2, 2009 2:36:31 AM

The i7 CPUs all have hyperthreading. This includes the i7-860. The i5-750 is the one that is missing hyperthreading. For the memory, triple channel is faster, but you'd never notice in ordinary applications. Right now, I'd probably go for the 1156 - it's cheaper, and it performs quite well. The only reason to go for 1366 is if you're doing something that needs extreme memory bandwidth or if you want multi-GPU (since 1156 only supports 16 PCI-E lanes total).
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December 2, 2009 2:50:25 AM

There is also a line of Xeon processors that use the 1156 platform, and end users are using them in p55 boards.
Intel Xeon X3440 Lynnfield 2.53GHz 8MB L3 Cache LGA 1156
with hyperthreading. More to confuse You ? lol
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
edited:
Neither platform is cheaper*quality wise* or closer to dead than the other.
In fact we are less than a quarter a way from a whole bunch of 32nm processors from
intel. For the 1156 platform, CHEAPER i5's and I3's than the current I5 750. But they will be on the smaller die. Right now on the leaked road map, they are going to have less cache. And be priced less than the i5 750, but that does not mean they will be inferior chips. These chips may o/c 25% more than what we are seeing now ?
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Related resources
December 2, 2009 4:58:50 AM

If you have the budget go with the 1366 socket boards. If nothing else you will avoid the socket burn issue.
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December 2, 2009 11:16:21 AM

alternatively, do your research before getting your mobo!
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December 2, 2009 1:10:06 PM

ckaz said:
....


What I need to know is if this performance drop in the 1156 Core i7 860 processor as compared to the Core i7 920 is worth me sacrificing the legendary GA-P55 UD6 mobo and 8GB's of G.Skill Ripjaw DDR3 1600 RAM.

I have also heard that triple channel RAM is faster than dual channel, so even though I am getting 2GB's more RAM, at faster timings with the dual channel, would 6GB's of tripple channel (minus the better timings) memory perform better?

Any help is appreciated!



On a desktop PC there are only a few apps that will really benefit from triple-channel (which I think most folks 'guess-timate' a 5% improvement in memory thru-put in those few programs).

With either i7 platform (I'm familiar with AMD benchies - not i7) you most likely will overcome the 5% triple --> dual with OC'ing the NB/IMC (which will reduce latency and increase bandwidth) and, of course, your tighter timings and greater quantity.
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December 2, 2009 3:35:29 PM

I don't think LGA 1156 will be obsolete any time soon, the socket just came out... And the fact that Intel is going to push a few more CPU's for that platform...

Spending 750.00$ CAN on a mobo/cpu/ram is rediculous, specially on the 1156, you might as well go for the 1366 platform at that pricepoint...

My advice would be to build an i7 920 rig with that budget.... In the end it will cost less and perform better...
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December 2, 2009 9:35:26 PM

thanks for all of the responses!

First off, what was said about multi GPU only on the i7 platform..is that what you meant? Because there are many 1156 boards that come with 3 PCI-E slots. I can't imagine that I would ever use more than two GPU's, but I am an audiophile, so I would use the third PCI-E slot for a sound card.

Would you recommend waiting for the new 32mm processor's? Because remember, this will be a performance build, so I definatley don't want anything worse than the i7 860, or the i7 920.

The problem with the 1366 board is that I don't really have the budget. Hell, I'm not even sure I have enough of a budget to go with the 1156 build I picked out (GA P55 UD6, G.Skill Ripjaw 8GB etc.)
For the 1156, if I am getting the top of the line hardware, then I am willing to stretch my budget alot further.
With the 1366, I'm just not sure if its worth stretching my budget so far when I'll only be getting the platform's entry level hardware.

How does the i7 860 OC? I am big on overclocking, so want to make sure I get a good performer. My setup right now is the Scythe Mugen 2 with 2 120mm fans on the 775 chipset. The mugen 2 is compatible with 1366, but if I was to go with the 1156, I would get the Prolimatech Megashadow.

What was that thing that somebody mentioned about this 'socket' burn issue? Sounds like something I would want to avoid..
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December 2, 2009 9:40:11 PM

The 860 overclocks quite well.

As for socket burning, it's a vastly overblown issue. Many of the early boads had poorly designed sockets. As a result, if they were heavily overclocked (like under liquid nitrogen, not just standard overclocking), it could cause electrical arcing and burning of the socket. There is basically no chance of it happening if you're overclocking without something like liquid nitrogen or a cascade cooler.
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December 2, 2009 9:43:05 PM

Quote:
First off, what was said about multi GPU only on the i7 platform..is that what you meant? Because there are many 1156 boards that come with 3 PCI-E slots. I can't imagine that I would ever use more than two GPU's, but I am an audiophile, so I would use the third PCI-E slot for a sound card.


As for multi-GPUS. The 1156 motherboards only have 1 true 16X slot. If you run 2, or 3 GPUs you'll be running 8x/8x as opposed to 16x/16x on those PCI slots.

So if you paired up matching systems between 1366 & 1156 and Crossfire or SLI setups on both, you'd find the 1366 would theoretically perform better. This is simply because the X58 based motherboards support dual 16x PCI slots, and will allow each video card to operate with full 16x bandwidth.

If you only intend on running 1 GPU, the 1156 will be just as good since it can run a single GPU at full 16x bandwidth. If you runt two cards, you'd still see improved performance, but each card would only have 8x bandwidth. Going to three cards, you drop the bandwidth for each card again. So it's a rule of diminished returns.

Sound Cards will use a PCI 1x slot, and not the PCI-E slot which your GPU uses by the way.
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December 2, 2009 9:43:58 PM

oh ok, thanks.

The thing that was mixing me was turbo boost. I believe that the 1366 processors have it while the 1156 ones don't. Is it a big deal?
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December 2, 2009 9:46:39 PM

And im not sure on that one jerrece. Since the UD6 has 24 phase power, would that not allow it to distribute a full x16 bandwidth dual GPU setup?
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December 2, 2009 9:46:47 PM

ckaz said:
oh ok, thanks.

The thing that was mixing me was turbo boost. I believe that the 1366 processors have it while the 1156 ones don't. Is it a big deal?


The 1156 chips still have Turbo Boost. Like my i5-750 has it. :)  The only real difference between i5 and i7 is Hyperthreading.

The real difference between 1156 and 1366 is Dual Channel memory versus tri-channel memory, and the 16x versus 8x PCI-E lanes with multiple GPUs.
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December 2, 2009 9:49:17 PM

ckaz said:
And im not sure on that one jerrece. Since the UD6 has 24 phase power, would that not allow it to distribute a full x16 bandwidth dual GPU setup?


24 phase power is not related to PCI-E bandwidth. Bandwidth and power are different things. :)  The 24 phase power has more to do with system stability when Overclocking and such. Where as the bandwidth limitation for PCI-E lanes has to do with the chipset the motherboard is based on.

Bandwidth has to do with how much data can be sent and how quickly.

The 24 phase power is about electrical stability, efficiency, and heat.
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December 2, 2009 9:56:25 PM

There's nothing entry level about X58 - what do you consider to be "entry level" hardware? i7 CPUs are more or less the same price regardless of socket, triple-channel RAM isn't a great deal more expensive than dual-channel and fundamentally most X58 boards are all great (it's only extra features like overclocking and multiple graphics cards that set them apart). Everything else that goes into a system is the same regardless of platform.

Most triple channel RAM kits are robust enough to tighten the timings up anyway, plus you don't see much of a real-world difference with RAM speed or timings with i7 anyway - the sweet spot is is 1600MHz at CAS8.

The socket burn issue won't affect you however - basically Foxconn have manufactured partially duff sockets for a lot of P55 motherbaords which mean the CPU doesn't sit quite as snugly in the socket as it should. When you start pumping serious voltage through these for mean overclocks we've seen some nasty burn-outs to sockets and CPUs.

I'd honestly put the cash together for a X58 build - if you do it right and choose wisely it's not going to be much more expensive than a P55 build, but I think you'll get more upgradeability out of it (I don't see 6-core i9s coming to P55 tbh) for the future and more oomph out of it now.

The Scythe Mugen 2 is a great cooler for some serious overclocks as well.

Tell us exactly what your budget is and specifically what you want to do with this system. If could well be that P55 is a better bet anyway.
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December 2, 2009 10:24:56 PM

The main difference between the two is that yout 1366 socket systems give you access easily to 50% more memory (total) - the extra channel is not relevant performance wise right now but is in volume.

The second difference is you will be seeing a 6-core processor soon for socket 1366, and there is no news of any 6-core processor coming to 1156, and i suspect the extra memory channel will kick in finally and help feed 6-core + ht etc.
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December 2, 2009 11:55:20 PM

ckaz said:
thanks for all of the responses!

First off, what was said about multi GPU only on the i7 platform..is that what you meant? Because there are many 1156 boards that come with 3 PCI-E slots. I can't imagine that I would ever use more than two GPU's, but I am an audiophile, so I would use the third PCI-E slot for a sound card.

Would you recommend waiting for the new 32mm processor's? Because remember, this will be a performance build, so I definatley don't want anything worse than the i7 860, or the i7 920.

The problem with the 1366 board is that I don't really have the budget. Hell, I'm not even sure I have enough of a budget to go with the 1156 build I picked out (GA P55 UD6, G.Skill Ripjaw 8GB etc.)
For the 1156, if I am getting the top of the line hardware, then I am willing to stretch my budget alot further.
With the 1366, I'm just not sure if its worth stretching my budget so far when I'll only be getting the platform's entry level hardware.

How does the i7 860 OC? I am big on overclocking, so want to make sure I get a good performer. My setup right now is the Scythe Mugen 2 with 2 120mm fans on the 775 chipset. The mugen 2 is compatible with 1366, but if I was to go with the 1156, I would get the Prolimatech Megashadow.

What was that thing that somebody mentioned about this 'socket' burn issue? Sounds like something I would want to avoid..


-Don't jump on the waiting bandwagon. Unless 32nm is released this year or very early next year i dont reccommend waiting. Waiting to buy a PC is like a virus, you wait a long time for something to come out and then you see something else about to come out and wait for that and eventually you end up waiting and waiting and 10 years go by and you don't buy a PC, some people actually do this. Decide what you want from what is available and out right now, do research, and buy. There will always be something better the next day but thats how it works.
-About overclocking, both CPU's overclock well, if you have good cooling either will be great. *Note*: Overclocking also depends on the mobo greatly. Also, if you purchase the right parts from the right companies, from the right places and look for deals an X58 system can very well fit into your budget. Strictly hardware speaking a very decent X58/1366 build can be made for 800 dollars + or -. You can't expect to get anything ridiculous but it will be really nice. Oh and if you do Overclock and go with 1366, may i reccomend a CM V8 or the V10 if you have the money.
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December 3, 2009 8:08:28 AM

@blackhawk1928:

Seriously, never go for those two coolers. They are a waste of time (and money in the V10's case)

The V8, however pretty it looks, has always been outperformed on upper to extreme overclocks by much cheaper hardware (Scythe Mugen 2, Titan Fenrir, Cogage True Spirit, Thermolab Baram, to name a few) and the V10 is too good for its own good - it's almost as if the TEC cooler's activation threshold is too high and as a result never really kicks in, leaving you with a pair of underpowered and oddly-configured 120mm fans to cool about as effectively as a system 1/3 its price.

Anyway, if this thread is about the OP trying to stretch his budget for a socket 1366 is there any point in suggesting a $100 CPU cooler?
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December 3, 2009 6:15:35 PM

Well...he said overclocking is a big thing for him so I thought i'd recommend good coolers. And the V8 is oversized and very heavy and pricy, i admit, i realy don't know how my motherboard has not snapped in half by my cooler yet. I hope my mobo is strong enough for the V8 cooler. However it cools very well. On stock speeds at full load the i7 is pretty much a little bit above room temperature. And overclocked w/ prime95 it never went above 45-50...so i don't anything needs to be any better than that.
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December 3, 2009 7:39:48 PM

Yea the V8 is an OK cooler, the issue is that you can get a better cooler for less. But I have to say that the V8 looks sexy compared to a regular cooler....
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December 3, 2009 7:53:56 PM

The V8 and the V10 look stunning and if it did the job I'd shell out for the V10 in a heartbeat.

Personally I'm going TRUE Black Rev C with a pair of Xigmatek XLF-F1253s - still stunning looking with the performance to match.
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December 3, 2009 8:00:45 PM

With my Scythe Mugen 2 equipped with 2 120mm fans on a Q9400@ 3.4ghz (2.68Vcore) and Gigabyte EP45-UD3R mobo, On idle it stays at around 26-29, on load its about 43 degress. I don't think its necssary to say that I will do all in my power to keep this cooler around :p 

On my computer, although I don't do heavy gaming, I do do some. Even with that said, I would want any game I play to be as close to perfect as possible. I'm not sure if thats just the way my mind works, but for whatever I do on my computer, I want to make sure it functions as close to the best as it can, hence my passion for overclocking. As I said earlier, I am a huge audiophile so it needs to have room to support a PCI-E sound card as wel as no more than two GPU's. Other than that its just the usuals, internet browsing, lots of school work etc. So it is safe to say that I'm not quite a power user in that I would never run a quad GPU setup, and I don't do photo or video editing, although on the topic I do like to do music editing, but what I do use my computer for, it has to really perform.
As for my budget, I started out with $600 in mind, now I'm realizing that I will need to stretch it to $750 or so, and i absolutley will not take it higher than $800. Like the 750 is already making my shudder.
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December 3, 2009 8:37:31 PM

Lephuron, the V8 weighs around 850g, its very heavy, i am actually looking at it right now imagining what massive pressure its putting onto the motherboard from its huge weight, it has a massive support bracket on the back side to, but i was actually considering to give it back because i did not know wether it was healthy for my motherboard handleing such a ridiculous weight. However the V10 weighs at 1200g....i think your mobo will just snap in half and it will break your processor unless it has extremely good support. However the coolers are made by 'Cooler Master" which is a very big brand name and reliable so I am trusting them that they know what they are doing when they make cooler that you can use to weight train. OvrClkr, since you are already hear, can i have your opinion about weather the V8 is safe for the mobo in terms of its crazy wieght even though it has very sturdy support?
And to lephuronn, i don't know about the v10 but it can only be better then the v8 and v8 does the job damn well. I have not seen my temperatures exceed above 45C running Prime95 and heavy video conversions for a long time. I and even then...my case fans were turned about 80% up only by my fan controller.
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December 3, 2009 8:53:37 PM

The V8 and V10 will holdup on almost any board. Now at days boards are made stronger than ever. The main issue with the V10 is not really the weight, its the length, you basically need a wide case in order to make sure there are no clearance issues.
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December 3, 2009 9:24:01 PM

ZOMG

Ncix.com is having a really big sale on 6GB's of OCZ DDR3 1600 CAS 9-9-9-24. http://www.ncix.com/products/index.php?sku=42867&promoi...

Now this could very well be the convincing factor that makes me go with a 1366 chipset. One question, I would be paying quite a bit more but there are some DDR3 1600 modules with tighter timings. I'm not sure exactly but I have seen some with CAS 8. How much of a difference will you timings make?

Now lets get some opinions, and I need to decide quick because the sale is only on until the 8th. Since I will be essentially saving $100 on RAM, should I take the leap with a 1366 system? What would you guys/gals do?
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December 3, 2009 9:59:09 PM

Check some reviews of those RAM modules to see if they either have XMP profiles (automatically tightens the timings) or they are robust enough to do it manually (they're OCZ - should be able to).

Then close your eyes and breathe deeply while you count to ten. Center yourself, say this is the route to take.

Then go socket 1366 and enjoy the motherbitch!
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December 3, 2009 10:19:36 PM

These modules are used in both Obsidian dual channel kit and Obsidian triple channel kit. They seem to get alot of bad reviews on newegg. MY experience was Great! They were on sale for 83.00 without rebate 2 weeks ago (2gx2). I'm i5 750, 1156- The profile that starts with my gigabyte board is 10-9-9-24 with my ram at 1600 mhz , my multiplier is set at 10x. The only "problem" is they start with 1.5v, they need to be manually set at 1.65. With default bios settings, moving my memory multiplier to 10x first caused the bios to load slow and flaky till i made it to the voltage menu to increase it to 1.65.
When these bench in passmark 7.0 the memory results are higher than most systems I d/l in the comparison chart. Which is opposite of my past experiences, usually those comparison systems are tweaked o/c benchmark pros.
I've never had a blue screen (cross my fingers)
Good luck.
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December 3, 2009 10:27:02 PM

Ugh!!! I was so exited!

your point on reading the reviews was well thought out. As of now, I have yet to see ONE good review. All of them have explained the sticks getting excessivley hot or simply not working out of the box.
:(  :(  :( 

EDIT: That was a major exxageration. Although I have seen many bad reviews, I am starting to see a few god ones. How did these sticks manage heat, based on your experience? And aso, do these sticks have an XMP profile?
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December 3, 2009 10:46:44 PM

ckaz said:
ZOMG

Ncix.com is having a really big sale on 6GB's of OCZ DDR3 1600 CAS 9-9-9-24. http://www.ncix.com/products/index.php?sku=42867&promoi...

Now this could very well be the convincing factor that makes me go with a 1366 chipset. One question, I would be paying quite a bit more but there are some DDR3 1600 modules with tighter timings. I'm not sure exactly but I have seen some with CAS 8. How much of a difference will you timings make?

Now lets get some opinions, and I need to decide quick because the sale is only on until the 8th. Since I will be essentially saving $100 on RAM, should I take the leap with a 1366 system? What would you guys/gals do?

I mean I doubt you would notice a difference but DDR3 at 1600mhz w/ CL9 isn't really that good, its OCZ obsidian which also doesn't have the best reviews. I'd aim for CL8 or 7 if you want to overclock and stuff. OCZ obsidian is okay, OCZ gold is good, and OCZ platinum is great. But between now and new years except awsome deals so i wouldn't dive right into that ram as there could be much better. And I recommend getting a 1366 build either way :)  Right now with the sales, you can get a very good PC, for a much less cost.
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December 3, 2009 11:23:30 PM

There is no heat issues. IMO, home builders get to caught up in the #'s game with memory. ddr3 latencies are all higher than ddr2 so that gets some nervous right away. Second intel supports 800mhz and 1066 tmings for 1336 boards and up to 1333 for 1156. Speeds after that are technically out of spec. Confusing , yes I know. My board ,bios , chip only 1333 mhz is available without o/c. So some buy this 1600 mhz memory and maybe pay more, or thought they paid more and then feel ripped off(wrongly) because the memory is not running at 1600. And they then feel they are leaving some performance on the table. (which is usually not true). Base clock and multiplier need to be adjusted to o/c or to create a situation where 10x (maximum multiplier in my case) bclk will equal 1600 mhz. Now because there are lots of situations this ram may found being used they put a backed down profile when you first start the board. Some feel since this profile is set at 10666 which is pc 8500 that they did not get what they paid for ? OCZ is faced with people running this ram in different platforms and different manufacturers m/b's. You should have no problem with this ram. But you could always buy some corsair ram that you see used in a test setup seen in a article. Giving you peace of mind that the ram will plug and play. Which I think it will in your case anyways.
You many notice that ocz also sells pc8500/ 1066 memory, i'm not sure what profile those come with. They have tighter 7-7-7 timings but they are rated at a lower speed.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Some wonder if this is all the same ram ! ??? The point is , hopefully the obsidians rated to run at 1600mhz will, if asked to.
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December 4, 2009 8:24:11 AM

Honestly I was toiling with this question myself for the last couple months... u can check my previous threads. I ended up getting the 1156 socket's i5 750 just because its too damn cheap to disregard. The i7 processors will hit u for atleast $200. Add that to the cost of a mobo and good ram and ur looking to spend atleast $400-500 my friend. I got lucky and pulled the trigger on fry's i5 750/Gigabyte p55UD3R combo for $190 AR. Added on some corsair dominator ram for $100 on newegg and DONE! Upgraded main components for $300. If you have a microcenter around you, consider the buying the i5 750 in store for $150, purchasing a mobo from amazon (i'd recommend the msi gd65), and buying the ram from newegg (cuz they're cheap as shnizat). Money saved goes towards your graphics card cuz that's REALLY WHAT MATTERS right?

SO in short... 1156 cuz its cheap and performs quite well AND there's nothing really out right now that warrants a premium priced pc (unless you're doing some heavy threaded work). Remember "aint got no cash, aint got no style, aint got no gal to make you smile" LOL. Hope that helps man!

~mrcrybaby

EDIT.. I moved up from a AMD 4800+ 939 system, and I could play pretty much anything including crysis because I have a great gpu (demigod gave my system a good thrashing though, more cpu dependent)... save money for a graphics card!
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December 6, 2009 6:46:18 PM

Hello,

I am new to these forums, but I couldn't help notice this topic and thought I would chime in with something that I think is very relevant for those that are concerned about 16x versus 8x PCI-E lanes with multiple GPUs using the 1156 socket.

Please give a read.. http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/HD_5870_PCI-Express_Scaling/1.html

If you dont plan on running more 2 GPU's, then 1156 is still a great choice, with only a 1-2% performance drop between 8x and 16x. Also consider that the scaling test was done with the new "top of the line" ATI 5870's!
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December 7, 2009 12:46:41 AM

Indeed, all of this is very useful information.

I believe I will go with the 1366 socket. Because of this, I will refrain from shopping until boxing day in Canada, when the biggest sales will be going on. Either that, or Christmas itself.
With Asus P6T series, I know that there is the P6T SE, the P6T. What are the differences between the two, because they do seem to be the most popular.
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December 9, 2009 11:06:02 PM

I have actually decided to go with the 1156 chipset for a few reasons, mainly that it has newer technology. The 1156 chipset came out fairly recently, so manufacturers are currently putting all of their new technologies into their P55 motherboards. For instance, the Gigabyte P55A-UD6 has 24 Phase power which is nice for cooling, but mre importantly for power usage, it has Sata 2.0 with 6GB's transfer rate, and it has USB 3.0 slots built in, so when USB 3.0 devices start coming out, I won't need to take up a PCI-E slot for an expansion card.
The one downside of this board that I can think of is explained in this reivew. http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/3023/gigabyte_p55a_ud6...
I don't understand exactly, so correct me if I am wrong, but if you have more than one graphic cards installed, they will both run at a lower bandwidth instead of one lane at 16x and the other at 8x. Also, if the USB 3.0 and Sata 6GB's controller are turned on, I believe that not even one graphics card will be alowed to run at its 16x bandwidth.
One of the upsides of the 1366 chipsets was that I was future-proofing my rig. The new 32nm processors that are upcoming from intel use the 1366 chipset, but thinking on it now, I would probably never buy that processor. 6 cores is way overkill for me. Now, with this UD6 board, I am getting SATA 6GB, USB 3.0, and 24 phase power, all under $300. Only the UD7 from Gigabyte has 24 phase power and SATA 6gb's, but no USB 3.0 and I believe it is around $400.
So the question is whether this loss of the extra PCI-e lane bandwidth is worth everything else. After all, I am no heavy gamer so the only reason I might do a double GPU setup would be with maybe 2, ATI 5770's. The reason why I even need the extr PCI-E lane is for my PCI-E soundcard, and the likelyhood of a RAID controller in the future.

Any opinions?
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December 9, 2009 11:28:10 PM

I also just found out about the Asus P7P55D Premium motherboard. I thiink this would be the ideal solution. It offers 32 phase power, two ful x16 bandwidth lanes, Sata 6GB's, and USB 3.0. So basically everything the P55A UD6 has and more, which would be the two 16x PCI-E lanes. I also like the reliability of Asus a bit better than Gigabyte.
Oh and I forgot to mention that all of this is at the same price point as the UD6's!
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December 10, 2009 12:00:01 AM

There is no Asus P55 board that provides dual x16 lanes.

Here are the PCI-E specs of the P7P55D Premium :

PCI Express 2.0 x16 = 2 (single at x16 or dual at x8/x8 mode)

The only board that does x16 / x8 using 2 GPU's is the EVGA P55 Classified and the FTW models.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...

There is no board that can do dual x16 as far as I know.....
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January 8, 2010 7:41:07 AM

OvrClkr said:
There is no Asus P55 board that provides dual x16 lanes.

Here are the PCI-E specs of the P7P55D Premium :

PCI Express 2.0 x16 = 2 (single at x16 or dual at x8/x8 mode)

The only board that does x16 / x8 using 2 GPU's is the EVGA P55 Classified and the FTW models.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...

There is no board that can do dual x16 as far as I know.....


Perhaps not in a 1156, however in 1366 the ASUS P6X58D Premium allows 16x/16x/1x
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131614
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January 9, 2010 4:20:31 AM

^Most if not all 1366 boards do 16x/16x anyway that asus isn't any special
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January 9, 2010 6:52:52 AM

+ Even if its truly 16x/16x on a p55 motherboard, its not truly 32 lanes because the LGA1156 only supports 16x max (to my understanding)

Most 1366 Supports 16x/16x or do a combination of 16x/8x/8x
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January 24, 2010 1:58:18 AM

ckaz said:
Indeed, all of this is very useful information.

I believe I will go with the 1366 socket. Because of this, I will refrain from shopping until boxing day in Canada, when the biggest sales will be going on. Either that, or Christmas itself.
With Asus P6T series, I know that there is the P6T SE, the P6T. What are the differences between the two, because they do seem to be the most popular.

It is a bit late for this guy but the ASUs P6T SE is a lower price and I think I'll go for it as well as the INTEL i7 920 and 3 sticks of 1333 2Gb ram with latency of 7 7 7 20 (OCZ PLATINUM TRI CHANNEL). The price is right if you shop around. Here are the best benchmark tests I have seen to date (they are still not finished with the i5 comparison).
Click here: AnandTech: i5 / P55 Lab Update - Now with more numbers#comments

http://www.anandtech.com/mb/showdoc.aspx?i=3639&cp=5#co...
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January 24, 2010 2:07:52 AM

Oh by the way, my choice of ram will not go 1600 unless I buy something else rated for 1600(of course) and I overclock the processor to accept 1600 since it was designed for 1333 or lower.
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January 24, 2010 2:39:30 AM

blackhawk1928 said:
^Most if not all 1366 boards do 16x/16x anyway that asus isn't any special


The Asus P6X58D Premium is one of the best 1366 boards out.... better than the P6T deluxe. I think it is very special :) 
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January 24, 2010 2:57:52 AM

:)  I agree, that person just emphasized on that fact that it supported 16x/16x but i just wanted to point out that most 1366 board do anyway. It is a good board, i waited on building my computer an extra couple weeks or so i would get it, too late now though, already been using this for 2 months.
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February 25, 2010 5:09:33 AM

Hi ckaz,

I'm actually facing the exact same dilemma you are as I am purchasing a new rig within the next week and after reading the replies to my questions in another thread and the replies that everyone here has graciously given you, I guess at the end of the day the question you should ask yourself is this.

How much are you willing to pay for the performance you want? Do you need all that much performance or could you think of a better use of the money you could save? We all know that the curve is exponential in terms of price vs performance. Prices don't scale nicely at all especially on the high ends, a 20% increase for performance may be a 50% increase in price.

That being said, it's fully up to you and your personal purchasing patterns that should determine what socket you choose. 4+ years ago I paid a premium ($300ish) for an MSI 975X Platinum Power-Up Edition V2 motherboard. Over the years I changed from a dual-core to a quad-core and ran Crossfire. I'm happy that I adopted a more expensive and forward looking motherboard as it essentially made my computer very future-proof. If you are big on overclocking, it may make sense to get the 1156 setup with higher quality parts that overclock better. Then again if you go the 1366 route you may not even need to overclock at all!

There has been alot of useful information given out by the other users here, like how the x16/x16 vs x16/x8 issue for PCI-E is actually negligible and all the discussions between triple-channel and dual-channel RAM. All this would seem important before buying but in real life, after you have settled in with your new computer and have become used to it, would you really think back and tell yourself "crap I should have paid that additional $50 for that 3% increase in performance"? The main thing I feel is important is to choose something you feel is right and will be happy with your purchase. The chase for technology will never end so it is important to set yourself a marker and to be satisfied with what you have if not you will not enjoy what you have purchased with hard earned money.

Unlike you, I game a lot hence I need the full performance and full potential of upgrading of the 1366 socket and X58 motherboards. It could be as fast as a year before I throw in more RAM or a secondary graphics card or even a new processor if Intel releases some more. Maybe you should just come up with a shortlist of your frequent activities so everyone can help you figure out just how best to choose. After all, performance is important but so is stability (since you mention you overclock) and currently nowadays it seems power consumption is also a prominent feature of buying parts. After all, power bills over the years can kill.

I hope I helped put things into perspective for you =)
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