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Koolance Reservoir and Pump, RP-1005

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December 1, 2011 12:34:53 AM

Hello, Koolance offers a reservoir/pump/controller that can fit within a single drive bay. i like the theory of this, however i am worried about the pumps capability of moving water through a completely liquid cooled system. (cpu, tri-sli, chipset, etc.)

http://www.koolance.com/water-cooling/product_info.php?...

Maximum Flow Rate: 8.7 L/min (2.3 gal/min)
Maximum Head Pressure: 7m (23ft)

if the pump cant hold up to all that, is there any reason why a more powerful pump could not be installed in its place, given that it physically fits?

or a second booster pump halfway through the loop?

i am semi-new to water cooling ;) 
a c 324 K Overclocking
December 1, 2011 12:41:58 AM

The PMP-400 is the Laing DDC, more commonly known as the Swiftech MCP355. It's a great pump with a lot of head pressure which is good for pushing through more restrictive loops. I realize this is a pump controller, reservoir (although, fairly small and would be a little more difficult to fill/maintain) but about right in price for Koolance.

Why do you want/need to cool your chipset? The blocks are typically pretty restrictive and offer little performance advantages unless you are cooling the northbridge (usually the most common 'chipset' components watercooled) and are going to do a lot of aggressive overclocking.

Do you know the total TDP in watts for the loop you want to cool? What other watercooling components have you looked at? What hardware are you cooling? Have you read through the watercooling sticky? What kind of budget for the watercooling components?

Welcome to the forum- we'll get you going, but be ready to learn info to help yourself figure out what you need for your build.
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December 1, 2011 1:29:15 AM

thank you, this is a great forum with many helpful people.

my reasoning for chipset cooling is that i live in a fairly dusty environment, and would like to eliminate (or significantly reduce) airflow through my sys.

hardware being cooled is CPU, three GTX 580 gpu's, full mobo cooling ( EVGA 141-GT-E770-A1 LGA 1366 Intel X58 motherboard) and possibly 4 sticks of RAM.

a few 120mm fans might get used, i just dont want more dust then hardware in my case in a few months.

TDP: on the loop, about 1000W.

EKWB blocks.
maybe this radiator: http://www.koolance.com/water-cooling/product_info.php?...

but im still up in the air about that radiator. could i get away with a smaller one, or two smaller ones spaced out throughout the loop, like right after GPU's and then CPU/chipset?

i have also considered a Laing D5 pump, Koolance's CTR-CD12 controller, and just a cylindrical reservoir in place of the RP-1005.

impressive sticky, by the way, i wish i had your dedication.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
December 1, 2011 12:45:16 PM

Have you looked at other manufacturers other than Koolance?

As for total TDP, 1000 watts is probably about right...give or take 100 watts. I'd have to do the quick math on that. However, you are going to need more than a single radiator for that much heat. For instance, most 3x120 radiators of the 'slim/thin' design handle around 530 watts or so with 1800 rpm fans. If you scale this to that 4x120 rad, you are looking at a 125% thermal capacity over a typical 3x120...so around 660 watts.

Regardless of watercooling or not, airflow is very important as motherboard components still produce heat, whether they have active cooling or not (capacitors, MOSFETs, etc).
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December 1, 2011 7:08:24 PM

i have looked at other brands for just controllers, however i seem to be having difficulty locating a pump/reservoir/controller by any other brand that can fit into a single drivebay.

Koolance states in the description of the rad i posted before, (4x120) that it can dissipate up to 1300W. i doubt that the fans on it being spun up to max speed (2200RPM) could account for that much increased capacity, do you trust these numbers?

i understand i will need some airflow, but with most of the flow going through the rad, it will certainly be easier and faster to clean it then the PC itself.

am i correct that (to a somewhat degree) that less air movement will mean dust will build up slower? this would be so if you look at it in terms of proportionally how many particles are in a quantity of air, the less air, the less dust.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
December 1, 2011 8:08:34 PM

You really don't want your pump on a controller...if you are looking to go that route, the MCP35x has PWM support, which is nice.

Quote:
Koolance states in the description of the rad i posted before, (4x120) that it can dissipate up to 1300W. i doubt that the fans on it being spun up to max speed (2200RPM) could account for that much increased capacity, do you trust these numbers?


No.

http://skinneelabs.com/koolance-cu1020v/4/
http://skinneelabs.com/koolance-cu1020h/4/

I'm not sure which rad this would be comparable to, but you'd want to evaluate performance to a 1:1 size ratio. Both rads from Skinnee's tests show around 600-625 watts with 1800-2000 rpm fans given a 10C delta (for a 3x120 model used). This is actually pretty generous, but we'll go with it. The rad you listed actually lines up more with the graph on the 1020V than the 1020H model being tested, so we'll use it as the example here.


625 watts /3 = 208 watts per 120mm fan area.
208w x 4 = 832 watts or so average for a 4x120 rad, which is about what I would expect. I'm sorry, but I really don't think 1300 watts out of a 4x120 rad is close to accurate for any manufacturer.

Less airflow would mean less dust, but it also means more dust could potentially collected due to lower speeds. Lower air speed means less heat able to be dissipated, so this should be taken into account. You'll want to evaluate the radiator FPI for fans with appropriate CFM and static pressure as well. Most radiators are lower FPI of 7-11 or so. These appear to be 20FPI, which is relatively dense. This also allows it to cool somewhat better than other 3x or 4x 120 rads similar in size as it creates additional surface area, but in turn, makes it more difficult for fans to push adequate amounts of air though...hence the need for good static pressure fans.
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December 1, 2011 10:29:34 PM

ok thats a little more believable.

with the fan quantity getting up there, im getting kind of close to the max wattage of my psu.

when looking into externally power cooling systems i came across Zalman's Reserator 2. it looks a little on the light side, but two of them at different places in the loop, like right after gpu's and the other after cpu and chipset cant be too terrible. or two seperate loops.

its not cheap, but wouldn't end up being much more then conventional rad, given the size and quantity of fans i will end up needing, and external power + silence are big pluses for me.

thoughts?

one thing that gets me wondering is that even though it is newer then the reserator 1, it is shown in the "old products" section on Zalmans site, while the reserator 1 is not.

reviews seen decent on it, the only con being it is on the light side.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
December 1, 2011 10:56:29 PM

When I speak in watts, I'm meaning heat watts produced by the components at load, not watts needed by your power supply. However, they are related and watts consumed by these components ultimately equate to 80+% in heat watts produced as a result. Just clearing up the wattage debate.

Reserator is junk; weak pump and made from aluminium...bad news.
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December 1, 2011 11:33:21 PM

i know, but the issue still stands that i am near the limit.

does anyone else make a better quality version of it? I see many pictures which are tower styled like the reserator1, but not the reserator.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
December 1, 2011 11:58:19 PM

Can you post those links? The Zalman Reserator is very poor quality when it comes to watercooling. Same can be said for Thermaltake Bigwater kits as well.
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December 2, 2011 12:21:39 AM

Lapua. Through my years of overclocking I have never been compelled to watercool a chipset. And I too live in a dusty environment called...a desert :p  in AZ. Like rubix said you will probably get such marginal performance you couldnt tell. If your truly concerned with the chipset Id go with a different air cooler or adding one of those flexible fans to manually set a fan to the current chipset cooler.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
December 2, 2011 12:41:34 AM

If someone was really wanting to push some aggressive overclocks, I would say it could be worthwhile to ensure stability. However, depending on your actual chipset used, your results would vary. Most chipset blocks are fairly restrictive, but even then, not quite as much as say a RAM block or MOSFET block for a motherboard. Hell, even HDD blocks are pretty restrictive by comparison and really offer minimal cooling compared to just mounting them with good fans. There aren't many HDD blocks that actually provide enough surface area due to their design to effectively cool a hard drive worth noting.

+1 for spot fans.
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December 2, 2011 1:50:52 AM

hmm.. decisions decisions. i see where yall are coming from. i diffidently would love to water cool, maybe not a full machine. water cooling just intrigues me.

if cpu and gpu's only were water, would the stock fans of a HAF- X case (x1 140mm, x2 200mm, and x1 230mm) fans be plenty sufficient for the leftovers?

i guess i just really need to get over my dust OCD.

when i saw those pictures they were buried deep within the jungle we call Google, if i happen to stumble across them again I will post.
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a b K Overclocking
December 2, 2011 12:02:48 PM

Your stock fans will cool everything fine. I have 5 fans in my case, and all of them are attached to radiators.

If you're really concerned about dust, buy fan filters. It generally takes a while for dust to build up inside, but just a cleaning around your computer will do you some good if your space is somewhat dusty.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
December 2, 2011 12:05:28 PM

Yeah, and even when does DOES build up, it isn't anything that you can't easily fix with canned air or an air compressor nozzle. Just be careful using a vacuum cleaner around your gear- vacuum motors are notorious for building up static which can be instant death for a PC.
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December 2, 2011 6:20:16 PM

my shop has an air system, so i could carry it out there and spray it down every once and a while.

thanks for all your help all!
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December 2, 2011 6:20:56 PM

Best answer selected by 6_5x47lapua.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
December 2, 2011 6:27:26 PM

Yeah, dust can be a menace, but in my experience, it usually takes a while for build-up to occur. A quick dusting every month or 2 should keep you cleaned out.
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