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48 Cores

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December 2, 2009 11:20:48 PM

:bounce: 

Word, playa.

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December 3, 2009 12:13:54 AM

Bet it beats bulldozer to market. :p 
December 3, 2009 12:41:08 AM

You realize that the chip was just a concept? i mean the physical chip is there but its not meant for the market, if you read the whole story.
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December 3, 2009 5:00:49 AM

yannifb said:
You realize that the chip was just a concept? i mean the physical chip is there but its not meant for the market, if you read the whole story.


Actually no, Intel is working of this for Cloud computing to start.

it probably has alot based off of terascale which also is paving the way for things like this.

Thing is its cool to see how a small chip with 48 cores thats so simplistic in design is as or more powerful than our quad cores.....
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December 3, 2009 12:24:40 PM

And we still cannot, as a general rule, write software to take advantage of 4 cores, let alone 48.

And cloud computing? Please. :(  I see several problems. We spent years getting away from the mainframe/terminal model of the 60's and 70's and I do not want to go back.

Who owns the data? Security? What happens when the company that owns the server where your data happens to be stored goes broke?

The first problem is preference. The second problem is procedural. The third problem is fundamental. Too much of the world simply lacks broadband connectivity.
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December 3, 2009 1:31:03 PM

jsc said:
The first problem is preference. The second problem is procedural. The third problem is fundamental...



A fourth revolves around what the Custodians of *your* data do with it behind your back.

By way of example: Chrome OS: "Your" data and apps must reside 'In The Cloud' because the OS itself is hardly more than a host for the Chrome browser. It lacks the capability to run applications and store data locally. So those things must reside elsewhere and be accessible via the Internet and a Browser interface. "Your" stuff lives in the cloud.

Well... Who owns the cloud? In this case, Google do.

Now, ask yourself "What does Google do for a living?" "How do they make their money?" The answer is they make their money by monitoring and data mining their search service and sell what they learn to advertisers so that we (consumers) may be better targeted by marketing.

Now: Ask yourself whether you trust people who already monitor, data mine, and sell everything that passes through their system to 3rd parties over whom you have no control. If you think you trust Google, ask yourself if you would trust Microsoft with the same information. Or Oracle. Or CSC. Now think again about Google... Uncomfortable with the idea? You should be.
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December 3, 2009 1:40:05 PM

Well if we got this cpu right now we would have to worry about it for many years. Just have to worry about the gpu. :lol: 
December 3, 2009 2:55:06 PM

What is the fundamental difference between this achritacture and larrabee? Are they related at all or is this totally independant?
December 4, 2009 8:27:39 AM

I heared of another company going to release 100core server processor!
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December 4, 2009 12:24:12 PM

daedalus685 said:
What is the fundamental difference between this achritacture and larrabee? Are they related at all or is this totally independant?


Two completely unrelated projects. This one is about how many cores Intel can cram onto a piece of silicon. Larrabee is centered around the integration of graphics and multi core processiong on a single chip. Neither are market ready.
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