Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Overclocking failure

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
December 3, 2011 9:45:16 PM

Hey everybody,

I don't really know a lot about computers but I have heard some things about overclocking, though I never tried it myself, afraid that I might do it wrong. What my problem is now, is that my computer keeps giving an error message when I boot it. It says that the 'previous process of overclocking has failed'. I have never tried such a thing so I was really surprised about the message. I had to go to the BIOS setup, but didn't change anything there and when I was finished it started normally and I could do anything I wanted again. Then, 3 days later (today), it happened again but this time, after exiting the BIOS setup, it showed the famous blue screen. I rebooted, the overclocking message appeared again, performed the BIOS setup, and it worked for 5 minutes. Then, there was no error message or anything, and the computer was still turned on, but the screen had no signal. The PC started making weird noises, which it made every 3 seconds, like it was searching for a missing part (like a printer when starting and grabbing the paper). Rebooting does not work anymore.

Some side information which could be important: I bought this computer like 8 months ago from someone who had build it himself, and did not need it anymore after 6 months. It was a really cheap computer so I decided to buy it. It worked extremely well those 8 months, but then we moved from the Netherlands to New Zealand and the PC had to be shipped. I'm not sure if that has caused the problem, but when I had connected everything in our new home and tried to boot the PC it started to make these printing noises I was talking about. It didn't do anything else, not even showing that error message. So we opened the case, checking if anything got loose (not that I know how I should reconnect that) but we could not find anything. We decided to remove some dust, and after that the PC did start, showing the overclocking message. So, I performed the said steps and everything worked and I used it 3 days without a problem. Untill today, when what I said above happened. Can anyone help me? I don't know about the motherboard since the PC won't start... Please help me :( 

More about : overclocking failure

a b K Overclocking
December 3, 2011 11:15:44 PM

Open up your case if possible and see if there's a manufacturer's name and model number on the motherboard.

Also, if the board is tyring to apply an OC setting you can simply reset the CMOS by removing the battery on the motherboard, unplugging the PC and then pressing the power button a couple of times. Wait maybe 10-15 minutes to be safe and then reinsert the battery and try starting the PC as normal. This should reset the BIOS and apply the default settings allowing you to boot as usual.
m
0
l
December 4, 2011 3:30:36 AM

Okay I opened up the case but I don't know where the battery on the motherboard is and what you mean with applying an OC setting. So it's an MSI motherboard, type K9A2 CF. Here's a picture of the inside, could you tell me where the battery is located?



Also, do you know if perhaps the three loose contacts in the bottom right (one black, two white) should be connected to something? (maybe thats causing the problem)
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 197 K Overclocking
December 4, 2011 7:15:07 AM

Those look like unused connectors.

Man, what a mess. :) 

OK. Let's give you some help.

For first-time builders, I recommend looking at these threads:

First a good idea of how all the parts fit together:
Build it yourself:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/274745-13-step-step...

Second, our main troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...

Third, more troubleshooting help:
(this may require the help of a computer savvy friend.)

The following is an expansion of my troubleshooting tips in the breadboarding link in the "Cannot boot" thread.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire (standby power supply): 5 volts always on. The green wire should also have 5 volts on it. It should go to 0 volts when you press the case power button, then back to 5 volts when you release the case power switch. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.

===========================================================================================================================

After this, if you still have problems, we will need to know the specifications of your system. You can use the free utility CPU-Z to tell you the CPU, motherboard, and memory. A similar program, GPU-Z, will tell you about your video card.
m
0
l
December 4, 2011 11:53:20 PM

Well it seems like it's working after I reset my BIOS by holding INS and pressing the power button, as I read somewhere. I'm kinda glad it's working now because your tips (though very helpful, thanks :)  ) are not easy for me to follow, since I really now very little about the inside of a pc. It has always looked like this when I bought it from the guy who made it and it never showed any problems. So I hope it will keep on working now, and when it suddenly fails again, I will call the computer savvy friend and we can look at your tips together, thanks ;) 
m
0
l
a c 197 K Overclocking
December 5, 2011 2:34:44 AM

Unfortunately, there's a limit to how simple you can make things without writing a really long post. If you can isolate a single thing, wikipedia does a not bad job of describing the basics.
m
0
l
a b K Overclocking
December 5, 2011 10:48:12 AM

Good advice jsc, but note that most MSI boards don't come with a system speaker, so if you don't have one installed there will never be any diagnostic beeps.
m
0
l
a b K Overclocking
December 5, 2011 12:56:34 PM

87ninefiveone said:
Good advice jsc, but note that most MSI boards don't come with a system speaker, so if you don't have one installed there will never be any diagnostic beeps.



Good point. They do usually come with a tiny speaker you can plug onto the board included in the box, at least some boards do. If they don't, you can order one when you order your new board, I always tell people if they are buying a new board, make sure it has a speaker or order one, they only cost a couple bucks and are worth their weight in gold if you need to do any trouble shooting. Lot of people never think about it, or overlook this, until they have an issue, then it becomes a pain!
m
0
l
a b K Overclocking
December 5, 2011 1:49:21 PM

Okay, for future reference the battery on your system is located in the lower right corner to the right hand side of the second PCIe x16 connector (the light blue one).
It’s interesting that you’ve got an MSI board, because I’ve had this same issue with my MSI board. In addition to the occasional random and never ending boot loops that I get, I also sometime get three quick failed boot attempts and then a message that says something to the effect that the “Overclock attempt has failed” and that Setup must be run. The thing is I have a completely different and unrelated board (Intel Z68 chipset).
Usually I just enter setup and load the default values and the system will boot up fine after a restart. I’ve contacted MSI about my problem and they’ve never been able to provide any sort of useful help other than the usual make sure your board is grounded, reset the CMOS, and make sure the processor is correctly inserted help. You might also try contacting them through their website or via phone to try and get some help as well. Even if the board is out of warranty you’ll be able to get help, and if it is still warranted they may send you another (which you might need help installing if you’re not comfortable.).

m
0
l
December 5, 2011 9:33:21 PM

Yes thanks, I already found the battery when I read it looked a bit like a battery that's in a watch. Hm, strange that you have the same problem, I thought it was caught by a lot of movement when it was shipped (which took 7 weeks). I hope everything is alright now, but if anything happens, I will contact MSI for support. Thanks everyone for the advice and help :) 
m
0
l
a c 197 K Overclocking
December 8, 2011 5:41:03 AM

jitpublisher said:
Good point. They do usually come with a tiny speaker you can plug onto the board included in the box, at least some boards do. If they don't, you can order one when you order your new board, I always tell people if they are buying a new board, make sure it has a speaker or order one, they only cost a couple bucks and are worth their weight in gold if you need to do any trouble shooting. Lot of people never think about it, or overlook this, until they have an issue, then it becomes a pain!

And fewer and fewer cases now come with them. I salvage mine from dead AT cases.
m
0
l
December 9, 2011 7:28:09 PM

87ninefiveone said:
Open up your case if possible and see if there's a manufacturer's name and model number on the motherboard.

Also, if the board is tyring to apply an OC setting you can simply reset the CMOS by removing the battery on the motherboard, unplugging the PC and then pressing the power button a couple of times. Wait maybe 10-15 minutes to be safe and then reinsert the battery and try starting the PC as normal. This should reset the BIOS and apply the default settings allowing you to boot as usual.



The simple way is to short the CMOS reset jumper... this is the hard PITA way :pfff:  , especially with those that don't feel like tipping their case on the side and trying to fit their fingers in depending on what's hiding the battery. lol.


m
0
l
!