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Coolermaster HAF 922 and Antec Truepower New 750W questions

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December 5, 2009 6:23:51 AM

Sorry if these are newb questions, but I am a first time system builder, and want to make sure I get things right.

The fan on the Truepower New 750W PSU is an intake fan, right?

I believe the ideal airflow with the Coolermaster HAF 922 case is to have air drawn in from the front and bottom and exhausted from the top and rear, right?

Since the HAF922 only supports installation of the PSU at the bottom, this means I should mount the PSU with the fan facing down right?

Thanks in advance for any advice you can give me!
a b ) Power supply
December 5, 2009 8:41:07 AM

yes downward facing and it helps with safety
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a c 243 ) Power supply
December 5, 2009 11:37:42 AM

Quote:
NO, if the psu mounts on the bottom of the case, you want the fan facing up.

It's a matter of personal preference, depending on wether you want the psu to act as part of the cooling system or not, I prefer not.
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a c 248 ) Power supply
December 5, 2009 11:54:59 AM

The answer to your first question is yes! The fan pulls in warm air from the interior of the case and exhausts out the rear panel of the case. That is the standard atx specification.

Power supplies are mounted in the bottom rear of the HAF 922. Normally you would install the power supply with the fan on top so you could still use the power supply to help with case cooling. That's normal.

There is one other option. The bottom of the 922 has a lot of perforated mesh for additional ventilation, airflow, and cooling. There is perforated mesh at the bottom rear where the psu is installed. You can install the psu so that the psu fan is on the bottom of the psu directly over the perforated mesh. That way the psu can pull in fresh air and cool itself. However, I do not recommend that for most users. If you place the case on a carpeted floor the carpet will actually block the air intake and allow carpet fuzz and dust bunnies into the case. The case would have to be placed on a stand or a desk to take advanatage of this option. A few years ago I made myself a nice little stand with casters. I purchased the parts for a few dollars at a local hardware store. Carpet problem solved.
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December 5, 2009 4:24:52 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
The answer to your first question is yes! The fan pulls in warm air from the interior of the case and exhausts out the rear panel of the case. That is the standard atx specification.

Power supplies are mounted in the bottom rear of the HAF 922. Normally you would install the power supply with the fan on top so you could still use the power supply to help with case cooling. That's normal.

There is one other option. The bottom of the 922 has a lot of perforated mesh for additional ventilation, airflow, and cooling. There is perforated mesh at the bottom rear where the psu is installed. You can install the psu so that the psu fan is on the bottom of the psu directly over the perforated mesh. That way the psu can pull in fresh air and cool itself. However, I do not recommend that for most users. If you place the case on a carpeted floor the carpet will actually block the air intake and allow carpet fuzz and dust bunnies into the case. The case would have to be placed on a stand or a desk to take advanatage of this option. A few years ago I made myself a nice little stand with casters. I purchased the parts for a few dollars at a local hardware store. Carpet problem solved.


Thanks for your detailed explanation. It really helps someone inexperienced like myself to understand the issues better.

My intention is for the computer to sit in either a holder (like this IKEA Summera unit if it will fit the HAF 922: http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/30090438) or a separate wood enclosure sitting underneath the desk (like the bottom right in this picture: http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/90079211).

From what you've written above, this seems to fit your scenario where fan down will help cool the PSU without allowing too much dust/carpet fuzz into the case, correct? However, I was unclear on a second point from your post: since this doesn't follow the standard of using the PSU fan to help in the case cooling, will this result in the rest of the case being warmer?

Thanks!
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a c 248 ) Power supply
December 5, 2009 6:00:10 PM

The answer to your question is it depends. Newer CPU's were operating at higher temperatures so designers moved the psu to the bottom of the case. That allowed for the installation of a large cooling fan in the top panel at the rear of the case just above the cpu. The large fans are more efficient at removing heat than the psu fans because air flow is not restricted as much. It was a matter of necessity that worked very well. That's why the gaming cases have extra fans mounted in the top panel. It would be a problem if there weren't any case fans on top.

Funny you should mention Ikea. I was familiar with Ikea due to my military career. I spent 12 out of 30 years stationed in Europe. I now live in Arizona and there is an Ikea not far from me. My entertainment center in the living room is made up of a variety of Besta modular cabinets and cubes in a Beechwood finish. Very nice warm color. It goes well with all the black audio and video equipment.

My current computer desk is also from Ikea. It's the large Mikael in a Birch finish. However, I am going there next weekend to purchase an extra long desktop. I think it's 76 inches long and available in beechwood finish. It's not as deep as a standard desk. It's just right for flat panel monitors. I can arrange Besta cabinets and cubes under the desk.
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December 5, 2009 8:21:59 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
The answer to your question is it depends. Newer CPU's were operating at higher temperatures so designers moved the psu to the bottom of the case. That allowed for the installation of a large cooling fan in the top panel at the rear of the case just above the cpu. The large fans are more efficient at removing heat than the psu fans because air flow is not restricted as much. It was a matter of necessity that worked very well. That's why the gaming cases have extra fans mounted in the top panel. It would be a problem if there weren't any case fans on top.

Funny you should mention Ikea. I was familiar with Ikea due to my military career. I spent 12 out of 30 years stationed in Europe. I now live in Arizona and there is an Ikea not far from me. My entertainment center in the living room is made up of a variety of Besta modular cabinets and cubes in a Beechwood finish. Very nice warm color. It goes well with all the black audio and video equipment.

My current computer desk is also from Ikea. It's the large Mikael in a Birch finish. However, I am going there next weekend to purchase an extra long desktop. I think it's 76 inches long and available in beechwood finish. It's not as deep as a standard desk. It's just right for flat panel monitors. I can arrange Besta cabinets and cubes under the desk.


My full system specs:

Case: Coolermaster HAF 922
CPU: core i7-860
CPU cooler: Noctua NH-U12P SE2
RAM: G Skill Ripjaws 4 GB (2x 2 GB) DDR3 1600 CL7 x 2
PSU: Antec Truepower New 750W
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD5850
Motherboard: MSI P55-GD65
HDD 1: OCZ Agility Series 120GB SSD
HDD 2: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB
Optical Drives: Sony Optiarc 7240S x 2

Given my configuration, would you recommend the PSU fan down or up? Also, would buying an additional fan to install in the side panel make a big difference? Would that fan be set up as intake or exhaust?

Thanks!
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Best solution

a c 248 ) Power supply
December 5, 2009 9:11:56 PM

The fan on a side panel is usually an intake fan. Depending on the location it can help to cool the video or the cpu.

I'd start with the psu fan on top. If cooling is sufficient, then try it with the fan on the bottom to see if there is any difference.
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a c 135 ) Power supply
December 6, 2009 12:18:25 AM

I'll echo Johhny ....

1. PSU's perform better outta the heat exhaust area of the CPU HS

2. Using cooler air, PSU fans can spin slower and be quieter

3. W/o the PSU in the way, case designers can use the laws of physics and thermodynamics to exhaust air out the top of the case.
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December 16, 2009 2:48:46 PM

The case manual I got with mine said you could mount it either way, depending on what you wanted. Are you reading an older version, or something?
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