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Computer over current question

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December 5, 2009 1:30:58 PM

how can i check for overcurrent in my computer without having to by tools etc? My computer has frozen some times, when i'm playing games this is. In the past i have realised that it was because of splitting molex connectors into 2. But ever since each device has it's own connector things have been fine. But in games freezing is now starting to happen. This is in all of my games i play. Sometimes i have two dvds in the 2 dvd drives that i have. Sometimes there are 2 games i liek to play the most so i leave them in the drives. When playing a game could that be effecting anything of course i'm playing one game at a time. My PSU shouldn't be bad it is a thermlatake 600 watt tough power, and i have a GTS 250. so power should be fine? I don't know why my computer is freezing. But i'm guessing that it's because of overcurrent, because in the past as i've said i've put molex connectors seperately and the computer stoped freezing.
December 5, 2009 3:07:14 PM

ther is no such thing as overcurrent, you can't give too much power to your computer, if you did it would fry, hence the name power surge, where your computer might never work again.

the reason you are getting freezes is too much load on a graphics card or processor, and it is taking time to catch up

the reason your molex connector solution worked was because, the PSU you have is a bit below standard, and when you reseated the connectors it somehow allowed for better power distribution.

For more help you need to tell us what games you play

but in general, the GTS 250 is a rebranded 9xxxx, so really it is inadequate to play the game depending on what game it is. In short the GTS is actually a weak graphics card

it could also be your processor though so please provide that info

based on the info you have provided, i would suggest you get a better PSU, and I don't think you need a 600 watt PSU, the 4xxx series barely even need a 500 watt PSU and most of them perform better than the GTS.

get a brand like antec, silverstone, PC&PC, seasonic

do not get rosewill, thermaltake, sunbeam, logistics, or raidmax PSUs
December 5, 2009 3:24:56 PM

What are you talking about. I'm getting around 80FPS average on Rainbow Six Vegas 2 with 4 aa and 8 af on 1280 x 1024 native screen resolution 19 inch monitor (full settings). Rainbow Six Vegas 2 is quite a nice game in graphics terms, the reason why i'm getting that performance is because i have multisampling aa not supersampling, but still the aa is still excellent. Looks just like on xbox 360. I'm also getting around the same FPS average in COD 4 with the same settings as well, the GTS 250 is certainly not a weak graphics card, ok it is compared to an ATI 5970. Thermaltake is very expensive, and i have too many molex and sata power connectors, and i have plenty of PCI-e power connectors as well. Also my power supply is an 80 plus. It is thermlatake toughpower, the GTS 250 only asks for a 500 watt power supply minimum. Not only that but my power supply is good quality, such as how i've said it's an 80 plus certified. No what i mean by the molex connectors is that i've split them on the hard drive, because with my case i need some low profile sata connetors, sorry what i mean was that i split sata powr connectors, and i could only find on the internet a 1 sata connector to 2 low profile sata connectors rather than 2 sata connectors to 2 low profile sata connectors you get what i mean. Also my cpu is a phenom ii 720 x3 overclocked to 3.2ghz. There's nothing wrong with that overclock i have dones tests for hours and it has remained stable lol. Zalman 9500nt cooler and i don't overvolt so my overclock should be fine with that cooler. I get decent cpu temperatures as well. I'm thinking there's a problem with windows files. Remember you've seen my computer config before i spoke to you in the past and you said the airflow looked adequate.
I don't think games like COD4 and Turok have bad graphics at all infact i still think they are smashing, and average in todays games.
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December 5, 2009 5:29:45 PM

oh ok, you should have told me the information in the first part of your reply before

in this case i would still say the Thermaltake is having issues distributing the power

it may be a good PSU but there can still flukes, if you have a similar PSU then swap them out and see if it works better.

That is why for consistency i said go with the other brands i listed

The problem with GTS 250 is that it is also a power hog and overheats easily but the overheating problem shouldn't be a problem for you

at what time do th glitches occur? like during hard play, multitasking?
December 5, 2009 5:37:42 PM

randomly in the game. i think it may have something with the dvd drives. Definately not with the graphics card. I have had no problems with the graphics card. i also did a power supply test using OCCT left it for an hour, came back from the gym and the computer was still in the same windows wich was good, OCCT showed the test passed with flying colours. When i've been playing Turok for example, it crashes in under an hour. But this goes for all games.

However i have had some problems in games. Could this just be normal. In the games sometimes pictures rip a bit i mean that the immage splits a bit when i move the croshair around in the screen. This occurs for all the games. But it is very insignificant, i don't think it's the monitor, the FPS stays relatively stable especially battlefield 2 got it locked at 100 FPS, bust still when i move the croshair sometimes at certain objects ripping happens. Is this called image tearing, and it happens at fast framerates? But i was thinking that it happens when the FPS suddenly decreases or rapidly rises then the image tears?
December 5, 2009 5:42:29 PM

i stick two game disks in each of the drives at the same time. But i'm only playing one exclusively at a time. The game seems to play fine and i never drop bellow a nice FPS so i never can say i got beaten because of a slow computer (single player). The only game i have problems on, is Crysis. I'm planning on getting an ATI 5850 in the future and playing Crysis on medium.
December 5, 2009 6:06:55 PM

Upendra09 said:
ther is no such thing as overcurrent, you can't give too much power to your computer, if you did it would fry, hence the name power surge, where your computer might never work again.

the reason you are getting freezes is too much load on a graphics card or processor, and it is taking time to catch up

the reason your molex connector solution worked was because, the PSU you have is a bit below standard, and when you reseated the connectors it somehow allowed for better power distribution.

For more help you need to tell us what games you play

but in general, the GTS 250 is a rebranded 9xxxx, so really it is inadequate to play the game depending on what game it is. In short the GTS is actually a weak graphics card

it could also be your processor though so please provide that info

based on the info you have provided, i would suggest you get a better PSU, and I don't think you need a 600 watt PSU, the 4xxx series barely even need a 500 watt PSU and most of them perform better than the GTS.

get a brand like antec, silverstone, PC&PC, seasonic

do not get rosewill, thermaltake, sunbeam, logistics, or raidmax PSUs


Overcurrent is actually a real phenomenon that happens often. For example, in your family room of your house, chances are you have a 15A 120V(in the US). If the total number of devices plugged in at one time draw over 15A of current, the breaker trips. A breaker is overcurrent protection. This is very important because a conductor has a current rating and anything over that current rating can cause excessive heat buildup which will lead to a fire if you don't have adequate overcurrent protection. Now remember, overcurrent protection does not protect from power surges from lighting, for example.

The OP was asking if there is an overcurrent safeguard in his PC in case he got close to, or exceeded the maximum current/amperage rating of the PSU.
December 5, 2009 6:10:09 PM

ultimately i'm wondering why all my games are freezing
it hasn't happened in the past
this computer config has been with me for quite some time. It could be because i am sticking 2 dvds in the 2 drives. Eversince i have done this the single game playing sometimes freezes. I think when i took frontlines fuel of war out and played battlefield 2 without frontlines just sitting in the other drive the game did not crash.
December 5, 2009 6:13:10 PM

I would like to help you, but reading those paragraphs without occasional spaces is very tedious. What Brand PSU do you have? What are the current/amperage ratings of the 12V 5V 3.3V -12V. List all of those and we can give you a better answer.
December 5, 2009 6:15:12 PM

but anyway, if that could imply overcurrent, it can't be? Because both dvd drives are on, each has their own molex connector. When i load up windows, both dvd drives are working and appear up on screen, if there were to be overcurrent then i would have a crash anytime in windows and not just during a game. But strange things have happened in the past; i have had things running on a single sata connector working for about a week until a game freezes, or windows freezes. With my mobo it pushes the cpu socket closer to the hard drive bays with my particular case the cpu cooler side is quite close to the cpu cooler. So i need low profile sata connectors. However, ultimately my case has good cooling as it has plenty of air vents and there is good space in front and behind and one one side of the cpu cooler for air to get in. (infront of the fan, behind the fan and on the side of the fan)
December 5, 2009 6:16:50 PM

omg thermaltake toughpower lol. I have mentioned that a lot of the time. Please you're reminding me of an idiot on one of the posts who once asked me if my computer was turned on despite i was reading cpu temps on a bloody program which needed the computer to be on. Also he thought my ambient room temperature was 48 degrees celcius, don't argue with me it's 20 degrees celcius.
December 5, 2009 8:05:42 PM

lol^


anyway, there might be errors in the drives, try a very simple game and see if that freezes, or running a music cd on it

reading one-shot's post, i need some clarification. Are you asking whether your PSU doesn't have enough wattage? or whether there is too much power being sent to the parts?
December 5, 2009 8:08:56 PM

yeah too much power being sent through parts i'm guessing. But i think that it's definately got something to do with dvd drives. They have their own sata connectors so i don't see how they should e whining lol.
December 5, 2009 8:13:12 PM

no thereis no such thing, that would happen only in a power surge rendering the computer useless

any way i still do think it has to do with the drives.
December 5, 2009 8:15:56 PM

well i think i shall test this theory out some time for sure, play battlefield 2 on it's own with no other disk in another drive.
Then play battlefield 2 on it's own but with Frontlines or another game disk stuck in the other drive. Play for as long as possible. I guess that playing with 2 disks in will end in a computer freeze.
December 5, 2009 8:16:34 PM

but at the moment i'm studying (educational work), hold gameplay for say a day.
a c 139 ) Power supply
December 5, 2009 8:28:48 PM

separate connectors don't really mean anything.....your PSU has channels or "rails" and there is only so much current on each rail. Exceed that and you will have issues.

You can use a simple tool like this to see what your PSU is drawing.

http://www.p3international.com/products/special/P4400/P...

have you been monitoring temperature ?

Download HWMonitor and let it run all the time....after a few hours, note how much difference there is between the min and max and how far they are apart from the reference voltages.

December 5, 2009 8:30:45 PM

yeah i have hwmonitor, it's good thanks.
December 5, 2009 8:31:01 PM

Here it's ok now i don't think i need any more hlep i will do that test i mentioned. Thanks people, and when i need help i will come back on.
a b ) Power supply
December 5, 2009 9:01:42 PM

Nashsafc said:
yeah too much power being sent through parts i'm guessing.

None of your conclusions are based in anything you have posted or in how electricity works. If suffering overcurrent, that electronics part is defective.

You have classic symptoms of an intermittent. Nothing as posted can define the intermittent or how to locate it. For useful answers, you must post useful information. That means numbers or facts from diagnostics. Subjective posts only result in wild speculation.

Get a multimeter (that is so complex as to be sold in Wal-mart, Radio Shack, most any hardware store, Lowes, Home Depot, or Kmart). Then use that meter to provide numbers here. Only then can someone report what is happening or what is defective. Procedure to do so may be provided only if you are interested in solving the problem by first obtaining numbers. Then you will also learn from the experience.

Nothing posted can isolate or identify your reason for failure. Only alternative to numbers is to keep replacing parts until the intermittent stops happening. A technique called shotgunning.
December 5, 2009 11:37:57 PM

I wouldn't recommend just anyone tearing down their his/her PC and use a tool that person has never used before on delicate parts. The voltage may be at the correct levels, but the current supplied may be too low. A dead battery shows 12V, but the current it outputs is very low. Current is measured in series, voltage in parallel. I would be afraid to see how the OP would go about measuring these different things. I would do a google search to see if the mobo has any issues. I had an MSI K9N SLI Platinum board. I had the first revision. After I overclocked it past a certain setting, it would reboot whenever I tried to burn a CD. You may be having a similar issue with your own motherboard. Do some research on the board and contact the manufacturer to see if there are any known issues. Power Supply issues also sound typical to what you're experiencing.
December 6, 2009 9:29:23 AM

i don't think it is over current anymore. The computer has been working fine for a long time this is a newly sprung up issue, but i definately think it has occured ever since i have put 2 dvds into the two dvd drives. Although only using one exclusively. I can't think of anything else i've done apart from add on a PCI fan controller on the back with just one fan on it that should cause my games to crash.
December 6, 2009 12:52:13 PM

yeah i agree the fan won't do anything

but try out the dvd idea and post back here if it works or not
a b ) Power supply
December 6, 2009 10:32:37 PM

one-shot said:
I wouldn't recommend just anyone tearing down their his/her PC and use a tool that person has never used before on delicate parts.

Basic electrical knowledge explains why that post said nothing about tearing down anything. And why disconnecting even one wire is many times more dangerous to hardware. Use a multimeter so that not even one wire is disconnected; so that computer damage cannot happen.

Anyone without simple high school knowledge of a multimeter has no business making computer hardware recommendations. Fear of that meter identifies one as hardware illiterate - zero electrical knowledge. One who uses a meter such as to find the OP's problem gains significant knowledge. Zero electrical knowledge is a problem too common among computer techs. In fact, one needs no electrical knowledge to pass the A+ Certified computer tech exams.

Heat is not something to be solved. A computer suffering heat problems in a 70 degree room has an electronics hardware failure. Heat is another diagnostic tool to locate defective hardware. More fans are a classic example of curing symptoms; not solving problems. Any minimally acceptable computer must work just fine even in a 100 degree F room. Another test that locates defective hardware before that hardware causes failures.

OPs problem is classic of an electrical problem that could have existed for months or even when that computer was first constructed. A problem that could have been identified months ago using less than one minute and a meter - long before the defect was causing computer failures.

But again, either one collects facts using the safer procedures. Or potentially complicate the problem and put hardware at much greater risk by disconnecting wires or swapping parts. Just more reasons why informed techs take numbers from a meter. Just more reasons why useful replies occur only after those numbers are provided.
December 6, 2009 10:59:24 PM

your point?
December 7, 2009 3:19:43 AM

I'm not sure if a person who doesn't understand the fundamentals of electricity be excluded from recommending computer hardware. You don't need to understand electricity to read basic reviews and compare hardware. I do think you should have a basic understanding of electricity before a person decided to put a computer together and/or attempt to repair the current PC.
a b ) Power supply
December 7, 2009 5:22:38 PM

Most reviews discuss things irrelevant such as looks. What is more important in a power supply? Filtering. Voltage regulation. How wide AC mains vary and its output sees no changes. How long power can be lost and the supply still works as if power always existed. Thermal operation range. These things are never discussed because so many reviewers are writing only for A+ Certified computer techs who know nothing about electricity.

Amazing are the computers techs who *know* a short circuit causes computer damage. Who don't know the difference between a brownout and a surge. Who waste money on power strip protectors that do not provide effective protection - do not even claim to. Because he does not know how electricity works. Subjective claims in reviews are written for the technically naive and for those who know only what they are told to believe. Only the informed demand the reason why AND the numbers.

OP has described a condition that may be identified in but a minute with a $16 tool to measure six wires.

OP's defect could have existed months ago - even when the system was first built. Subjective computer reviews based only on visual examination would never know that, never know why, never know how to find defects before failure results, and devoid of what is necessary - the numbers.

A defective power supply 'system' (which is more than just a supply) can boot and run a computer for months before the failure causes strange intermittent failures. That reality is never discussed in reviews. OP's symptoms are consistent with such failures - from one who did learn how electricity works and even designed computer parts.
December 13, 2009 9:44:50 AM

i think it's somethnig to do with a lose connection regarding the sata data cable. My graphics card covers the slots so i need to use right angle sata cables to reach the slots. But one of the four doesn't fit in properly. I've got an ordinary but shorter cable head now and it fits in. I've been playing some games for some time and i have had no freezes. So i'm guessing the lose Sata Cable was possibly the fault?
December 13, 2009 9:49:47 AM

to be honest it was a hypothesis, i could draw up any hypothesis if something goes wrong because looking at the computer, the configuration couldn't possibly be more appropriate. So i was realy confused about what was happening. Even the rather lose connection of the sata cable bellow the graphics card appeared to have some sort of stable tight connection despite it wasn't totally plugged in. I don't think i'm an idiot to be honest, and it's normal for someone to become worried if they have followed all the right regulations, they may feel something may possibly be faulty with hardware.
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