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Need help on choosing a power supply.

Last response: in Components
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December 9, 2009 2:42:34 AM

Hi guys. 4 weeks ago i had to send my gtx 285 away for repair, the manufacturer told me the waiting list is extremely long. They offered me and i ended up getting to pay a small fee for a gtx 295 instead, which im happy about. Iv also noticed i wil have to get another powersupply as my current one will not run it.
My current specs are
intel i7 920 @ 3.3 (stock volts)
ud4p mobo
9800 1gb (courtesy card)
cpu cooler: noctua n-12p se
coolermaster sniper case
dvd burner

PC and Cooling silencer 750watts

the card there offering is
XFX NVIDIA GTX 295 PCI-E 2.0, 1792MB, DDR3, 896bit
"Minimum Power Supply Requirement: 730 Watt with one 6pin and one 8-pin"

So will my 750 watt run it? or will i have to upgrade?

So far iv looked around and this store down the main street of my town has these unknown power supplys that are really cheap

Ritmo Force 1200 Tri-Fan Gaming Power Supply
1200 Watt Tri-Fan Gaming Power Supply

# Complies switch with Intel 2.3 Version.
# 3 High quality fans for improved cooling and effeciency.
# Suitable for "ALWAYS ON" application.
# Speed thermal fan control function.
# Fan grill & black plated connectors, preventing rust and bad.
# Ultimate performance on efficiency & reliability.
# State of the art circuitry design & PCB layout.
# Home or office use.
# High energy power with lower ripple & noiseless.
# Short circuit & overload protecttion on all outputs.

Feature
Fan Size : 120mm + 80mm
I/O Switch : Yes
Temperatures Control: Yes
AC Cable : No
Connector : ATX 20+4Pin x1, Molex 4Pin x3, SATA x8, PCI-6+2Pin x2, FDD 4Pin, 12V CPU 4Pin x2, PCI-E 6Pin x4, 8Pin x1
#

Manufacturer Ritmo
Model Force 1200 Gaming
Watts 1200W
Voltage 2.3V
Amps 10A at 60Hz and 6A at 50Hz
Fan Size 120mm + 80mm x 2
I/O Switch Yes
Temperature Control Yes
AC Cable No
Connector ATX 20+4Pin x1
Molex 4Pin x3
SATA x8
PCI-6+2Pin x2
FDD 4Pin
12V CPU 4Pin x2
PCI-E 6Pin x4
8Pin x1
Package Dimensions (L x W x H) 30.5cm x 18cm x 11.5cm approx.
Product Dimensions (L x W x H) 15cm x 16.5cm x 8.7cm approx.
Package Weight 2.2kg


or should i spend alot more for something like the (more trustworthy)
Antec TruePower Quattro 1000W ATX Power Supply

Just wondering if anyone has heard of these
Ill probably lean to a know brand

More about : choosing power supply

a c 248 ) Power supply
December 9, 2009 2:52:35 AM

No need for a 1kW psu, your 750W PC Power & Cooling should run it quite well as it is a good PSU and wouldnt have an issue running 2 GTX275s, and a GTX295 is just 2 underclocked GTX275s.

I actually cant find a single listing of the amperage available on the 12V rail of that ritmo 1200W PSU, so i definitely wouldnt get it.
a b ) Power supply
December 9, 2009 2:55:47 AM

I would spend the extra money and go with a known brand if you are going to upgrade. a cheap crappy PSU is an easy way to damage your PC.
However- I don't think you really need to upgrade. it says minimum recommended is 730W, and you are above that so you should be fine. The recommended PSU is almost always got a good margin more than you really need to run it. I would suggest you at least try it with your current setup. If your PSU isn't powerful enough, it just won't boot properly. If this happens, you go out and get a bigger PSU, but you really ought to be fine with your 750W supply.
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December 9, 2009 3:20:18 AM

hunter315 said:
No need for a 1kW psu, your 750W PC Power & Cooling should run it quite well as it is a good PSU and wouldnt have an issue running 2 GTX275s, and a GTX295 is just 2 underclocked GTX275s.

I actually cant find a single listing of the amperage available on the 12V rail of that ritmo 1200W PSU, so i definitely wouldnt get it.


flyinfinni said:
I would spend the extra money and go with a known brand if you are going to upgrade. a cheap crappy PSU is an easy way to damage your PC.
However- I don't think you really need to upgrade. it says minimum recommended is 730W, and you are above that so you should be fine. The recommended PSU is almost always got a good margin more than you really need to run it. I would suggest you at least try it with your current setup. If your PSU isn't powerful enough, it just won't boot properly. If this happens, you go out and get a bigger PSU, but you really ought to be fine with your 750W supply.


Thanks guys, ok ill try first with my 750, also im runnign other stuff isnt that gonna use quite a bit? so arent i really under power if i use the 295?
also iv read that my current power supply can go to 850 if it has to, isnt that bad?
a c 248 ) Power supply
December 9, 2009 3:40:56 AM

A PC Power & Cooling PSU is rated much lower than it should, it will provide 720W of power from the 12V rail, there are many 850W PSUs that wont do that, this coolmax is rated at 850 but only promises 710W from the 12V rail, probably at 25C, where as your current PSU will easily provide the full 720W at up to and likely exceeding 40C.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The PSU calculator only puts your expected draw at a bit over 400W which seems about right, 125W max for the CPU, the GTX295 has a TDP of about 290, probably 100W between the chipset, ram, HDD, and ODD, well within the optimal efficiency range of the 750, it wont even be stressed out too much.
http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine

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a c 248 ) Power supply
December 9, 2009 4:26:31 AM
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You'll be fine with your PC Power and Cooling power supply.

PC Power and Cooling has a reputation for high quality power supplies. They consistently earn high marks in technical reviews. The are stable, reliable and come with an extended warranty.

The power recommendations made by video card manufacturers are overestimated because they know there are users who will buy cheap, low budget power supplies of questionable performance and value.

Finally, it has been clearly demonstrated in technical reviews that gaming sessions require a lot less power than people think. OCCT and FurMark tests that are often used in technical reviews are designed to create an enormous amount of stress on a system. There is no game that can even come close to producing that kind of stress.
December 1, 2012 8:23:06 PM

RITMO products?

Ritmo Shitmo 1000VA UPS - the Kamikazi of UPS's (and BAD power supplies - full write up on that too)

http://suker-punch.blogspot.com.au/2012/11/ritmo-shitmo...

Everything about their stuff is junk.

At best it's bad, at worst it will destroy your PC and burn your house down.

Their customer service is bullshit too.


There is a reason why the Ritmo PSU is so LOW PRICED and a QUALITY brands costs way more......

More often than not, the saying "You get what you pay for" has much truth.

Personally - speaking from experience, it pays to get quality first and cost second - but one must also be discerning about GENUINE quality and cost effective pricing, vs. presteige mark ups and glamour pricing.

But there are also hidden costs, such as warranty, durability, customer service, repairs, technically competent support staff and all the back up of a great organisation.

The flip side of this is when the *** PSU blows up and writes off your computer and all your hard work, and you have no recourse to any easy solution or quick solution, except legal and technical reports, courts, having to buy a whole new system to get it all going, recovering (hopefully) all your data off the drives etc., etc., etc..

So while you may be able to get a cheap crap PSU for say $50, vs paying say $200, the cheap PSU may give unstable power, have way over rated specs, and a short life span - it could be dead within 3 months and when it goes - you have a whole mountain of difficulties to get over just to get a replacement PC.

But a QUALITY PSU, with QUALITY high spec parts, will with regular cleaning with very low pressure clean dry compressed air (1/2 Bar / 5 - 10 PSI), should last 10 years +.

But when the Ritmo goes - they do not give a *** and they will do nothing to help you.

At best you might get a replacement PSU, but only within it's imaginary warranty period - and the rest of the PC? We only warranty the PSU they will say - when in fact they are liable for the damage the crap PSU does.

Best avoid the problem brands and the issues they can create and go with something really good.

!