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Universal gpu block and 3/4" compression fittings

Tags:
  • Water Cooling
  • Compression
  • GPUs
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
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December 14, 2011 2:15:08 AM

So being that I'm new to watercooling, I've been learning as I go. I've been making things harder for myself with dumb mistakes (aka getting XSPC 750 RX360 water cooling kit).. if I were to do it over again I'd get a smaller radiator.. the 360mm radiator that came with the kit is very difficult to fit internally in a case (although I fixed that with the HAF X case). The other thing I made a mistake with was going with 1/2" ID 3/4" OD tubing and going for 3/4" compression fittings. I've known I'd want a universal GPU block for a while, and I can't seem to find one that will fit my compression fittings (http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_p...). I bought 2 extra when I was originally setting up my CPU only loop in anticipation of adding my gpu to the loop at a later date, and now I'm finding that most (all that I've looked at) universal GPU blocks do not accommodate 3/4" OD compression fittings. So my question is whether there is a block I haven't found yet that would fit my setup, or perhaps some kind of adapter of sorts that would give me the room I need.

On a related note, I've heard that many people that use universal blocks fabricate heatsinks for the VRAM and the voltage control things, and I was wondering if that was actually necessary.. and if it is.. is there a link anywhere with some information about it. Thanks in advance,

gbkinum1

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a b K Overclocking
December 14, 2011 1:27:11 PM

I just recently switched from full cover to universal waterblocks and hit the same snag. I use 3/4" OD tubing and comp fittings on most of my blocks, but had to use fittings for the GPU block because none of the ones I found can hold such large fittings (it's simply due to the smaller size of universal blocks).

I use a Swiftech MCW82 and it's been working really well in terms of temps. It comes with 1/2" ID fittings and clamps (at least when you order directly from Swiftech), so it didn't pose any problems in terms of added purchases.


As for the VRAM and VRMs, you do need to cool those, and they make heatsinks that attach using thermal adhesives (basically permanent). At the advice of Rubix_1011 (from whom you'll probably hear) I used very VERY small drops of superglue to attach the heatsinks to the VRAM and VRMs, so I can potentially detach the heatsinks later for when I upgrade.

Here's the heatsinks I used (came with a bunch of extras for only $1 more than most other kits): http://www.frozencpu.com/products/12221/vid-160/Arctic_...

Depending on the GPU and the placement of the VRMs, I'd probably recommend this one instead due to the smaller VRM sizes (I didn't use the large ones in the previous kit because they were too big):http://www.frozencpu.com/products/12296/vid-162/Arctic_...

Check out the last page or two of my build log - I have pictures of my new 560Ti with and without the heatsinks.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/267276-29-completed-1...
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a c 331 K Overclocking
December 14, 2011 1:33:49 PM

I figured you would comment on this one since you just went through the exact same process and would offer some good advice. :) 
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a b K Overclocking
December 14, 2011 1:46:38 PM

When you're having issues with anything, it's sometimes nice to know you're not alone ;) 
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a c 331 K Overclocking
December 14, 2011 1:56:08 PM

I concur.
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December 15, 2011 2:48:40 AM

Best answer selected by gbkinum1.
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December 15, 2011 2:51:26 AM

Thanks for the informative post/setting me on track :D 
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a b K Overclocking
December 15, 2011 12:44:09 PM

Yeah, if you need specifics out my blocks and what I did I'll most likely be able to help, but I just recently switched to universal blocks and got most of my help from rubix :) 
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a c 331 K Overclocking
December 15, 2011 12:46:33 PM

I've always run universal blocks. Works great for me. The 1-2C difference and minor flow differences (however, MCW60's flow better than most current uni's) is worth it to spend $10/bracket instead of $110 per block, per GPU release.
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a b K Overclocking
December 15, 2011 2:28:24 PM

rubix_1011 said:
I've always run universal blocks. Works great for me. The 1-2C difference and minor flow differences (however, MCW60's flow better than most current uni's) is worth it to spend $10/bracket instead of $110 per block, per GPU release.


That's what made me switch over :) 
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a c 331 K Overclocking
December 15, 2011 2:36:50 PM

To be honest, it also takes a bit more skill and planning with universals due to the need to cool the remaining components, but not much more. If I had the cash to spend each time I bought a new card to also buy a full cover block (x2), I would...but I just can't justify it. I guess it really isn't a matter of being able to...I just am OK with the minor differences in cooling performance for the larger benefit of cash in my pockets for other upgrades (or beer).
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a b K Overclocking
December 15, 2011 3:09:54 PM

rubix_1011 said:
To be honest, it also takes a bit more skill and planning with universals due to the need to cool the remaining components, but not much more. If I had the cash to spend each time I bought a new card to also buy a full cover block (x2), I would...but I just can't justify it. I guess it really isn't a matter of being able to...I just am OK with the minor differences in cooling performance for the larger benefit of cash in my pockets for other upgrades (or beer).


As a frequent upgrader (understatement of the century) I've found it much easier to sell older cards without waterblocks. At which point, you're stuck selling the waterblocks.

I switched over from my 6950s now so that when the new cards come out in the coming months, I'm not stuck with those full covers. I missed being an NVidia fanboy :D 
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January 7, 2012 4:00:27 PM

So holidays are over and I have a little budget/gift money left over to finally add my gpu to the loop :D  I'm looking at probably getting the swiftech MCW82 (coincidentally same one as boiler :D ). I found some vram heatsinks from koolance (8 sinks for $4.. http://www.koolance.com/water-cooling/product_info.php?...) and was wondering if that'd work. The kits you linked me to before had different size heatsinks and a mounting plate, I'm not sure if you actually used the mounting plate or just got the kit for the cheap heatsinks (tossed the plate).

I was also looking at a couple rotary fittings (45 degree compression fittings for 1/2" ID 3/4" OD tubing.. http://www.frozencpu.com/products/12089/ex-tub-741/Bits...) because I really like the look of compression fittings for some reason.

I think my pump/radiator can handle adding the gpu to the loop.. my cpu is slightly OC'd (phenom II x4 955 running @ 3.8ghz), so adding my really old geforce 9800 gtx+ card (running stock) I'm hoping won't be an issue with the RX 360 kit. I will probably be in the market for some new hardware in the not too distant future.. but wanted to kinda double check to make sure I'm not missing anything. Should I start ordering now, or are there any last minute suggestions?

Thanks again,
gbkinum1
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a b K Overclocking
January 7, 2012 10:51:01 PM

Yeah, I just bought that kit since it was $1 more than the only other heatsink kit I found, and it had more heatsinks if I needed it. It was originally for an Arctic aftermarket air cooler, so that's why the backplate was included in the kit.

With the comp fittings, keep in mind that the compressions won't fit on the MCW82. However, it is supposed to come with 1/2" barbs and clamps (mine did). Also, you'll need to get another backplate if your GPU is not on the supported list for the plate that is included (the 560Ti plate was $5-10 on FrozenCPU).
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January 8, 2012 12:12:34 AM

boiler1990 said:
Yeah, I just bought that kit since it was $1 more than the only other heatsink kit I found, and it had more heatsinks if I needed it. It was originally for an Arctic aftermarket air cooler, so that's why the backplate was included in the kit.

With the comp fittings, keep in mind that the compressions won't fit on the MCW82. However, it is supposed to come with 1/2" barbs and clamps (mine did). Also, you'll need to get another backplate if your GPU is not on the supported list for the plate that is included (the 560Ti plate was $5-10 on FrozenCPU).


Wait.. even the 45degree rotary fittings won't fit? I figured from the picture that the reason larger compression fittings would not fit were because of the distance between the in/out holes and whatnot.. but the 45degree rotary fittings wouldn't have that problem.

Also thanks for letting me know about the possible backplate for my gpu, I'll go check on that after this post. That would have been a real bummer if I waited for it to all get shipped and took everything apart only to have to order something else & wait for it to get shipped :p 
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a b K Overclocking
January 8, 2012 11:53:02 AM

I didnt actually look at the fittings you posted until now. Those should fit quite well; the part that doesnt fit on those blocks is the outer part of the compression fitting because its larger than 3/4" in diameter.
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January 8, 2012 6:06:55 PM

Awesome, thanks for all the help. I just ordered all the stuff I needed.. gpu block, 45 degree compression fittings, the mounting kit (thank you so much for making me check!), and the kit of video ram sinks you recommended. I thought I'd be so clever and search around for a good deal, but these sites lure you in with low prices and gauge you with the shipping. How can the shipping cost double (or more) than the item you purchased (especially small items). Anyway, it's all on its way =]

You mentioned earlier that you used a very tiny drop of superglue to attach the video ram sinks, do you still need to use any thermal compound.. or does the drop of superglue do the trick? I've seen that most of the video ram sinks mention they come with their own "thermal adhesive" and you just need to peel off the paper and apply to whatever surface.. so am I going to need to wipe that off before I put my dot of superglue on? Thanks again for all the help!
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a b K Overclocking
January 8, 2012 11:12:09 PM

The heatsinks I bought were bare and came with a bottle of thermal adhesive (different from thermal paste for CPUs/GPUs). The thermal paste wont allow it to stick to the chip if there's superglue, but when I put the sinks on the VRMs there was a slight height difference on the pairs of chips that make up one VRM so I used regular thermal paste to even out the difference (need to provide heat conduction to the sink somehow).
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January 9, 2012 4:57:43 AM

boiler1990 said:
The heatsinks I bought were bare and came with a bottle of thermal adhesive (different from thermal paste for CPUs/GPUs). The thermal paste wont allow it to stick to the chip if there's superglue, but when I put the sinks on the VRMs there was a slight height difference on the pairs of chips that make up one VRM so I used regular thermal paste to even out the difference (need to provide heat conduction to the sink somehow).


Errr I'm still a little unclear about how to apply the superglue/thermal paste. It sounds like you are saying to apply the tiny dot of superglue on one of the mosfets and fill the void between the mosfets with thermal paste? I feel like I'm misunderstanding what you are telling me :( 
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