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Configuring a secondary HDD to increase size of a directory on another HDD in Wi

How does one go about increasing a directory size on say C:\ while using a completely separate hard drive? Is there a way to have this occur?

E.g. C:\Media is full on disk space. I have a secondary 2 TB HDD but I want to add that space to that C:\Media folder. Is this possible without reformatting?

Thanks!!
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More about configuring secondary increase size directory
  1. Best answer
    Yes, on Windows you can mount a partition to a folder. More info on this Microsoft article.
  2. Close, but the folder needs to be empty in your solution. The folder is not empty in my scenario. Any other thoughts?
  3. Could you replace each additional media file in C:\Media with a link (.LNK) to the 2TB drive?
  4. bcboncs said:
    Close, but the folder needs to be empty in your solution. The folder is not empty in my scenario. Any other thoughts?

    Did you move the contents of C:\Media to the 2 TB drive as indicated in Microsoft's article? Once empty, you can mount it.
  5. I'm trying to use my original c: (2TB) to combine with my other 2TB. I believe that method will only give me my second hard drive's disk space.
  6. bcboncs said:
    I'm trying to use my original c: (2TB) to combine with my other 2TB. I believe that method will only give me my second hard drive's disk space.
    You are correct.
  7. bcboncs said:
    I'm trying to use my original c: (2TB) to combine with my other 2TB. I believe that method will only give me my second hard drive's disk space.

    Yes, you are running Windows, so that is the limitation you must deal with.
  8. PhilFrisbie said:
    Yes, you are running Windows, so that is the limitation you must deal with.


    That was a pretty ignorant response considering I already have a semi-workable method, but I'm looking for other options.

    Anti-conformists always think their crap doesn't stink.
  9. You could switch to dynamic disks to create a spanned volume. Please make sure that you fully understand the pros and cons of dynamic disks and spanned volumes before doing it.
  10. bcboncs said:
    That was a pretty ignorant response considering I already have a semi-workable method, but I'm looking for other options.

    Anti-conformists always think their crap doesn't stink.

    Hey! I was the one who pointed you right at the only way you can do this on Windows. I happen to personally know about this due to working with Windows servers for years, so I have done the work around a few times myself.

    My comment was intended to broaden your awareness that other operating systems have file systems that behave differently; I use Linux for some server chores, and I don't even own a MAC!
  11. PhilFrisbie said:
    Hey! I was the one who pointed you right at the only way you can do this on Windows. I happen to personally know about this due to working with Windows servers for years, so I have done the work around a few times myself.

    My comment was intended to broaden your awareness that other operating systems have file systems that behave differently; I use Linux for some server chores, and I don't even own a MAC!


    Fair enough, my bad.

    I'll have to try the mounting
  12. Best answer selected by bcboncs.
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