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Configuring a secondary HDD to increase size of a directory on another HDD in Wi

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July 22, 2011 3:32:07 AM

How does one go about increasing a directory size on say C:\ while using a completely separate hard drive? Is there a way to have this occur?

E.g. C:\Media is full on disk space. I have a secondary 2 TB HDD but I want to add that space to that C:\Media folder. Is this possible without reformatting?

Thanks!!

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a b G Storage
July 22, 2011 7:17:00 PM

Yes, on Windows you can mount a partition to a folder. More info on this Microsoft article.
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July 23, 2011 8:21:55 PM

Close, but the folder needs to be empty in your solution. The folder is not empty in my scenario. Any other thoughts?
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a c 311 G Storage
July 24, 2011 3:59:40 AM

Could you replace each additional media file in C:\Media with a link (.LNK) to the 2TB drive?
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a c 82 G Storage
July 24, 2011 11:06:23 AM

bcboncs said:
Close, but the folder needs to be empty in your solution. The folder is not empty in my scenario. Any other thoughts?

Did you move the contents of C:\Media to the 2 TB drive as indicated in Microsoft's article? Once empty, you can mount it.
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July 24, 2011 5:42:14 PM

I'm trying to use my original c: (2TB) to combine with my other 2TB. I believe that method will only give me my second hard drive's disk space.
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a c 82 G Storage
July 24, 2011 9:47:34 PM

bcboncs said:
I'm trying to use my original c: (2TB) to combine with my other 2TB. I believe that method will only give me my second hard drive's disk space.
You are correct.
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a b G Storage
July 25, 2011 4:40:26 PM

bcboncs said:
I'm trying to use my original c: (2TB) to combine with my other 2TB. I believe that method will only give me my second hard drive's disk space.

Yes, you are running Windows, so that is the limitation you must deal with.
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July 25, 2011 10:00:03 PM

PhilFrisbie said:
Yes, you are running Windows, so that is the limitation you must deal with.


That was a pretty ignorant response considering I already have a semi-workable method, but I'm looking for other options.

Anti-conformists always think their crap doesn't stink.
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a c 82 G Storage
July 26, 2011 1:28:34 AM

You could switch to dynamic disks to create a spanned volume. Please make sure that you fully understand the pros and cons of dynamic disks and spanned volumes before doing it.
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a b G Storage
July 31, 2011 12:29:14 AM

bcboncs said:
That was a pretty ignorant response considering I already have a semi-workable method, but I'm looking for other options.

Anti-conformists always think their crap doesn't stink.

Hey! I was the one who pointed you right at the only way you can do this on Windows. I happen to personally know about this due to working with Windows servers for years, so I have done the work around a few times myself.

My comment was intended to broaden your awareness that other operating systems have file systems that behave differently; I use Linux for some server chores, and I don't even own a MAC!
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July 31, 2011 7:06:55 PM

PhilFrisbie said:
Hey! I was the one who pointed you right at the only way you can do this on Windows. I happen to personally know about this due to working with Windows servers for years, so I have done the work around a few times myself.

My comment was intended to broaden your awareness that other operating systems have file systems that behave differently; I use Linux for some server chores, and I don't even own a MAC!


Fair enough, my bad.

I'll have to try the mounting
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July 31, 2011 7:07:04 PM

Best answer selected by bcboncs.
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