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December 16, 2011 3:51:28 AM

Looking to buy the 2600k but not really looking for 5GHz what is the overclocking like where it does it automatically, seems to good to be true? Anyone tried it?

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a c 233 à CPUs
a c 106 K Overclocking
December 16, 2011 4:35:50 AM

You should never "automatically" overclock anything. BIOS overclocking is the most stable, safe way.

That being said you will not know what your chip will hit until you try. A certain small percentage of chips can hit 5Ghz+, a larger percentage can hit 4.5 - 5Ghz and so on. A few unlucky people get chips that can only hit 4Ghz or maybe not even overclock at all.

Mine is 100% stable at 4.5Ghz with hyperthreading on. My temp and voltage is low enough I probably could go higher but 4.5 is high enough for me.
December 17, 2011 1:48:00 AM

anort3 said:
You should never "automatically" overclock anything. BIOS overclocking is the most stable, safe way.

That being said you will not know what your chip will hit until you try. A certain small percentage of chips can hit 5Ghz+, a larger percentage can hit 4.5 - 5Ghz and so on. A few unlucky people get chips that can only hit 4Ghz or maybe not even overclock at all.

Mine is 100% stable at 4.5Ghz with hyperthreading on. My temp and voltage is low enough I probably could go higher but 4.5 is high enough for me.


But the people at asus say I can press 'Overclock' in the easy mode thing and it does all stability testing. Surely it would work/
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December 18, 2011 12:37:30 AM

What motherboard do you have? I am not sure why people think "automatically" overclocking processors is inherently a bad idea, it is all still done by the BIOS (in the case of the ASUS Z68 mobos), so I don't know what anort3 is referring to. I am running a 2500K on an ASUS P8Z68-V Pro mobo; on that motherboard there is a physical TPU switch, that when enabled, raises the turbo limit without doing anything else. Other ways involve going into the BIOS and checking "manual" for the CPU ratio, and typing in a value (e.g. - "44", to achieve 4.4 GHz). Then, there are ways to play with the voltage and baseclock, but I have yet to see any real proof that allowing the more "automatic" overclock, incurs damage to the processor or something.
a c 140 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 18, 2011 1:10:11 AM

Auto overclocking's biggest downfall is that it tends to use more voltage then needed. This leads to a warmer cpu.

With a 2600K just push the turbo speed and test. I was able to also step down the voltage. Think it was 1.25 i set it to.

If you do want to use the auto, in the basic UEFI bios there should be an option called Asus optimized or something like that that should do it for you.
December 18, 2011 3:53:34 AM

From my experience using both the auto turbo increase (flipping the TPU switch on the mobo, and setting the optimized defaults in the EZ section of the BIOS), and raising the CPU ratio manually in the Advanced section of the ASUS BIOS (I don't apply those at the same time, obviously), I haven't noticed too much difference in voltage when applying an overclock at around 4.4GHz. Now, I did switch off the "Internal PLL Overvoltage" function, or whatever it's called. Does this make a big difference, or is there another way to lower the core voltage while still getting stable overclocks; I have read that lowering the voltage too much and attempting overclocking can lead to instability as well.
a c 140 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 18, 2011 4:27:37 AM

ebalong said:
From my experience using both the auto turbo increase (flipping the TPU switch on the mobo, and setting the optimized defaults in the EZ section of the BIOS), and raising the CPU ratio manually in the Advanced section of the ASUS BIOS (I don't apply those at the same time, obviously), I haven't noticed too much difference in voltage when applying an overclock at around 4.4GHz. Now, I did switch off the "Internal PLL Overvoltage" function, or whatever it's called. Does this make a big difference, or is there another way to lower the core voltage while still getting stable overclocks; I have read that lowering the voltage too much and attempting overclocking can lead to instability as well.


Yes, too low of a voltage(lower voltage runs cooler and uses less power) will cause the system to become very unstable. That is why do lots of testing. It is all about balance and all cpus are different.

PLL over voltage is something some users swear by while others stay away from. It may help at very high clock speeds but users report it both helping and hurting.

I had noticed when I left the voltage at normal it jumped quite a bit as the clocks went up. I think this is dynamic VID or whatever they call it at work, so not even Asus's fault.
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