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Motherboard compatibility for 5750

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March 11, 2010 4:29:41 AM

hi im planning to upgrade my vc into his 5750 i dont know if my mobo can support this new card. i have Gigabyte GA-G31M-S2L its an fsb 1333.. do you think guys it can support the 5750????
a b V Motherboard
March 11, 2010 5:25:10 AM

Yes, how what is the model of your power supply? thatll be the biggest thing determining whether your system can support it or not
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a c 135 V Motherboard
March 11, 2010 5:31:07 AM

Hello :) 
Yes it has a PCI-E 16x slot so it supports a HD 5750 but as p1n3apple said make sure your PSU supports it
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March 11, 2010 10:33:40 AM

yeah actually that was my first problem psu .... but i already posted a thread about that and its already solved.. im gonna buy ocz 500w i forgot the title i think its modsXstream correct me if im wrong... but any way thanks for your comment about my thread ^_^
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a c 177 V Motherboard
March 11, 2010 1:28:09 PM

Some things to keep in mind when looking at new PSUs (power supply):

If you want to be 'future proof', the slot spec lists 10W slots, 25W slots, and 75W slots, which acommodate grahics cards; howeve, part of your 75 Watts counts the 3.3V suppy, at 3 Amps (which most later GPUs don't use), so you really get 12V at 5½ Amps, for 66 Watts. The spec limit for VidCards is total 300W - and, from the 'leakage' so far, it appers that a full-blown fermi from nVidia, with all 512 cores enabled, will wanna suck 280W (awfully close to the MAX) - less the slot's 66, means your 'PCIe plugged' rails will need to be at least 18A @ 12V. To make things worse, there are cards which want the whole thing, even if it's 'split' across an x6 and x8 connector, to come from the same rail for the card to operate correctly... I'd be looking at modulars with enough PCIe rails to cover possible card addirions, and each rail at least 20 Amps - preferably 25...
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March 12, 2010 2:19:34 AM

whew are you a electrical engineer??? im sorry man but some topic about psu voltage you posted i cannot relate ^_^ .... but thanks for your tip i will try to understand those i misunderstand about electricity ^_^ the only thing i understand about psu is the wattage .... and pfc if its active or passive ..... thats all hehehe
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a c 177 V Motherboard
March 12, 2010 1:20:11 PM

I'll simplify a bit:

Think of electricity as being like the water in your house. The voltage is like the water pressure - I used to live out in the country and had a well; the water pressure was 'made' by a pump in the basement, and was kinda low - hard to rinse the dishes :??:  ; now, I live in a city, with (high) municipal pressure - much easier to rinse the dishes [:bilbat:5] Current (given in Amps), is like the volume of actual water flowing - the amount coming out the faucet... The fuses (or circuit breakers) in your basement are rated in Amps, and are there to limit the volume of electrical flow to each seperate circuit, so a short somewhere doesn't melt your wiring and start a fire!

The power (usually given in Watts), is the product of the two - the amount of flow, times the pressure behind it; thus: Watts = Amps X Volts (...or, Amps = Watts / Volts...). The power represents the 'work getting done', which can be anything - an electric motor might be turning a sanding belt in your workshop, or producing 'suction' to vacuum your rug; a light bulb is giving off light (and heat) - and follows the above - the bulb is rated in Watts, so a 250 Watt bulb, divided by your 120 Volt supply, is 'drawing' a hair over 2 Amps - if your room circuit is 'fused' for ten Amps, you can likely run five of those bulbs - if you try to add a sixth, the fuse blows (or the circuit breaker 'pops') :cry: 

The 'work getting done' in the components of your computer is 'turning on and off' huge numbers of nearly microscopic transistor 'switches', very rapidly. Each single one takes a bit of power to change state, and each one 'leaks' a bit; the more switches, the more power; the faster they're being switched, yet more power (Watts)! In the above examples, every one has a heat byproduct - the motor in your vacuum cleaner gets hot, the light bulb gets very hot, and a computer component, like a vidcard, with millions (if not billions) of 'switches' needs a dedicated fan to shed that heat... The 'work done' (power consumed) is, once again, rated in Watts, and can vary from less than ten (for an old, slow, not very 'capable' vidcard), to the two-hundred-eighty guessed at for the upcoming nVidia 'Tesla-based' 512-core monsters. The slot it's plugged into supplies some of that power (75 Watts) - the rest has to come from the external plug(s) on the back of it... The amount of power, both supplied by the slot, and the overall power allowed, are determined and set out in the PCIe 2.1 specifications - which all PCIe device manufacturers are expected to adhere to - there are a large number of these 'specs' - SATA, USB, lots of JEDECs (Joint Electronic Device Engineering Councils):
http://www.jedec.org/
http://www.jedec.org/about-jedec/jedec-history
and these 'specs' allow us to have 'interchangeable' parts for our computers which can (usually [:bilbat:2] ) be expected to 'work together :sol: 

Computer power supplies are often organized into 'rails' - seperate sort of 'sub-supplies', each with their own power rating. A 'rail' is typically not fused - it has, built into its circuitry, a limiter that keeps it from trying to deliver more current (Amps) than it's rated for - called a 'fold-back'; if you try to draw more than rated current (which would endanger the supply by creating more heat that it's designed to get rid of ['dissipate']), the rail is said to 'fold back' - it nicely shuts itself down, protecting itself, and the location the 'excess' current is flowing to... Here is a power supply's 'rail distribution':
http://www.silverstonetek.com/downloads/PSU/ST1500_cabl...
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March 13, 2010 1:04:45 AM

wow thanks man for the lesson about electricity now i understand the purpose of amp for power .... and how to get the watts or amps etc etc ..... but i have a 4 question for you




1.) what is 512 core you talking about from nvidia is it a 512mb memory speed??? or bandwith???


2.) on your 1st post you said the real watts of video card is 280 or maximum of 300watts ..... so if the ati or nvidia recommend a psu on there product like 450w for 5750 vc it means the 450watts they recommend it includes the whole system like motherboard, HD, ram etc etc right????


3.) what is the real use of passive and active (PFC) in psu??? which is better on this 2?? and before i buy a psu is this necessary to check out if its active or passive of your system info of psu you wanted to buy????


4.) in your 2nd post you said i can run a 5 bulb if i have a 5 amp coz amp=watts/volts my question is what if i use a 220volts not a 120volts into a 250watts bulb what will happen to that bulb??? are they gonna blow ..... coz i remember my dad his an tv electrician his always told me about 120v and 220v ..... dont plug a small power thing like radio etc into a high power plug like 220v plug


thats all ^_^
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a b V Motherboard
March 13, 2010 1:18:56 AM

ill try answer for you.
1. Massive server system, the system has 512 cores

2. Yes, the rating ati/nvidia recommend is for whole system, not just the card

3. Active PFC automatically detects voltage and makes it run at that setting, eg 115v in USA and 230v in places like australia. Passive pfc is just... same thing just not as efficent, active PFC is recommended by anyone with half a brain :) 
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March 13, 2010 1:33:55 AM

ahhhh ok i get it thanks man i edit my post i add 1 last question and this is the 4th question




4.) in your 2nd post you said i can run a 5 bulb if i have a 5 amp coz amp=watts/volts my question is what if i use a 220volts not a 120volts into a 250watts bulb what will happen to that bulb??? are they gonna blow ..... coz i remember my dad his an tv electrician his always told me about 120v and 220v ..... dont plug a small power thing like radio etc into a high power plug like 220v plug




^_^
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a b V Motherboard
March 13, 2010 2:40:55 AM

Ahh not sure bout that one... generally lights are measures in wattage... to me as long as they fit in theyll work... not sure bout the math and such behind it though
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March 13, 2010 4:24:12 AM

hehehe i think bilbat will answer my 4th question ..... but anyway thanks for your help pin3apple ^_^
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March 13, 2010 4:30:17 AM

ahhh w8 pin3apple .... i got a question for you .... do you know any motherboard for i series that can run also a ddr2 or 3 memory .... coz ddr3 is expensive and i dont want to replace my corsair xms2 dhx ddr2 800
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a b V Motherboard
March 13, 2010 4:52:56 AM

Phenoms/athlons can support ddr2 and ddr3 ram, depends on mobo as to what which one they use...
As for 775... nvm
Just decided to check your mobo specs, it can only support ddr3 ram, if you try put ddr2 in it it wont work
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a c 177 V Motherboard
March 13, 2010 2:59:06 PM

Glad it helped; you're very welcome!

As is often the case on the internet, you got some answers - including some wrong ones :??: 

Quote:
1.) what is 512 core you talking about from nvidia is it a 512mb memory speed??? or bandwith???

This is a video card, and has nothing to do with servers (which, often, have really crude video, as it's alomost never used for anything but BIOS adjustments...)

'Cores' are the actual computers - the parts that execute instructions to do the work. During the early development of the microcomputer, the rule was: one chip = one execution 'core'. As the process to make chips improved, there were advantages to 'ganging up' the cores, more than one on a chip. The first dual core processor for home use was Intel's Pentium Processor Extreme Edition 840, released in early April 2005. We have run into 'limits' of the physics involved in making chips faster, mainly issues of heat dissipation (remember, I told you: " the faster they're being switched, yet more power...); it appears that, for the for the foreseeable future (barring developments in the basic physics), the practical 'speed limit' is somewhere between four and five gigahertz. To make computers faster, we have to make them 'wider' - i.e., more execution cores per chip. (BTW, Intel has six core i7s and Xeons slated for release the sixteenth of this month! [:bilbat:5] )

There are both problems, and advantages, to this 'widening'. The problems are 'using' multiple cores to 'solve' a problem; we tend (probably, because of 'habits of thinking') to think about problems in a more or less 'linear' fashion - first we do this, then we do that - and we have trouble 'dispatching' parts of the problem to be taken care of simultaneously. For single problems, this is hard! However, inside a real system, there are lots of things going on that can be done, more or less, at the same time: I'm handling a video stream off this tuner; I'm writing a file to disk over there; I'm pulling in a 'bucket o' bits' off the internet through that network port...

For graphics, the advantages of 'wide' computing (lots of 'cores') are more compelling. Rendering of a 3-D scene involves 'breaking it up' into lots of tiny triangles, and applying texture and lighting effects to each one; the trick to it is: reflections and shadows from each individual triangle affect each adjacent triangle - so the more you can do at a crack, the faster your graphics processing gets!

Recently, it has occurred to us that many real world problems resemble this process; each bid and offer of futures contracts affects every active (and subsequent) bid and offer; the 'pumped' electron state of every atom in a crystaline matrix affects each adjacent atom; the ionization potential of each protein molecule in a 'folded' biological 'machine' (like an antibody) affects the final 'shape' of the overall 'chain'; and on and on... The trick is learning the programming process to 'divide up' these sorts of problems - I think this will be a 'generational' thing: kids growing up in a 'parallel world' will learn these methods 'from the ground up', which will make them infinitely more effective than old dinosaurs like me [:bilbat:6] trying to learn to 'convert' linear thinking!
Quote:
2.) on your 1st post you said the real watts of video card is 280 or maximum of 300watts ..... so if the ati or nvidia recommend a psu on there product like 450w for 5750 vc it means the 450watts they recommend it includes the whole system like motherboard, HD, ram etc etc right????

Typically, they are quoting overall power for the system - but - such 'scatter-gun' approaches neglect the myriad variables that actually determine the overall power needed. Best off using a calculator, like this:
http://www.antec.outervision.com/
Quote:
3.) what is the real use of passive and active (PFC) in psu??? which is better on this 2?? and before i buy a psu is this necessary to check out if its active or passive of your system info of psu you wanted to buy????

Power factor is not something I can explain using the 'pipe and water' analogies; it requires an understanding of the effects of phase shift between current and voltage in an AC circuit - for a quick look, try this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_factor
The actual relationship between active and passive is complex, and has mostly to do with costs at varying overall power ratings; active can generally 'adjust' to varying loads (and input voltages), passives are 'fixed'; I will quote two pieces, though, that 'sum up' (to a degree):
Quote:
Passive PFCs are typically more power efficient than active PFCs. Efficiency is not to be confused with the PFC, though many computer hardware reviews conflate them. A passive PFC on a switching computer PSU has a typical power efficiency of around 96%, while an active PFC has a typical efficiency of about 94%.

Quote:
Due to their very wide input voltage range, many power supplies with active PFC can automatically adjust to operate on AC power from about 100 V (Japan) to 230 V (Europe). That feature is particularly welcome in power supplies for laptops.

Quote:
4.) in your 2nd post you said i can run a 5 bulb if i have a 5 amp coz amp=watts/volts my question is what if i use a 220volts not a 120volts into a 250watts bulb what will happen to that bulb??? are they gonna blow ..... coz i remember my dad his an tv electrician his always told me about 120v and 220v ..... dont plug a small power thing like radio etc into a high power plug like 220v plug

This answer requires a concept of the 'pipe and water' explanation that I neglected in the first pass - the pipe itself! Let's start by talking about hoses, instead of pipe. If you put a ten foot garden hose on the hose bib on your basement wall, and set to washing your car, you will have plenty pressure to rinse it off successfully. Now think - 'what will happen if my neighbor across the street and down the block has no water, and we run eight hundred feet of garden hose from my house to his driveway - will he be able to rinse the soap off his car?' Answer - not bloody likely! He'll be lucky to get a 'trickle' - because the hose itself 'resists' the flow of water...

Everything that conducts electricity has an intrinsic 'resistance' (well, except super-conductors - but they're a different lesson :lol:  ); the less resistance, the more current can 'flow'. This, too, is a mathematical relationship: current (remember, again - the volume of electrical 'flow' - in Amps) = voltage (the 'pressure') / resistance (which is measured in a unit called 'Ohms')

When current flows, it creates heat - the more current, the more heat. A given size (thickness) of wire can only deliver so much current before it heats enough up to melt. This, again, is the function of fuses - they limit the amount of current available to flow in a wire, or circuit of wires - the fuse melts before the wire can! From the mathematical relationships, you can see that the higher the voltage, the less current (Amps) it takes to do a set amount of work (power, in Watts). This is why, though most household devices are set up for 110 VAC, high powered stuff like electric stoves, clothes dryers, and shop welders, are wired for 220 - you can deliver more 'oomph' through smaller wires... Now, if you double the voltage goint through a 'fixed' resistance, like a lightbulb, you double the power it uses - so it either burns very brightly, and fails sooner than intended, or it simply makes a 'flash', and burns out immediately!


Aside, to Pixar1942:

The only systems actually setup to take either DDR2 or DDR3, using the same board, are the ones using the Intel P35C northbridge - and I wouldn't wish one on my worst enemy! They were a 'neat idea', but they never did work worth a damn, with either DDR2 or 3 :( 



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March 15, 2010 1:59:45 AM

thanks bilbat for the lesson. Its very useful it really helped me to understand about electricity, Specially in psu because you explain it in a easy way although im not an electrical engineer I’m an young I.T student im having a difficulties to understand about watts/voltage etc etc specially if I read a topic or review about psu I really cant understand them but since when you post a lesson here in my thread about electricity I understand them now ^_^ and if I reread it again those reviews in new egg or topic here in toms hardware about psu im sure I will not get out of place (OP) heheheheh ^_^ ^_^ one day i will teach those lesson I learn from you to my classmates, my friends or other people who will ask about this topic to me ^_^ but any way thank you very much
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March 15, 2010 2:02:35 AM

(BTW, Intel has six core i7s and Xeons slated for release the sixteenth of this month! [:bilbat:5] )





i think thats a i7 extreme eition a processor for server 6 cores .... but the normal i7 is still a quad core :wahoo:  :wahoo: 
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March 15, 2010 2:03:17 AM

About the I series motherboard my friend said there was a i series motherboard that can support a ddr2 or 3 ram its an ECS p45 something …. I forgot the complete product name he said it’s a color black board …. But I don’t know if gigabyte , asus or msi has that kind of board

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a b V Motherboard
March 15, 2010 3:23:03 AM

As said, its better just to stick with one standard of ram, instead of hovering in between, ddr3 is highly recommended right now, and chances are more than likely youll be able to use it in your next build, besides ddr2 and ddr3 ram are the same price close enough atm
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March 15, 2010 4:04:45 AM

aw ahh i mean i series the 1366,1156 socket like i3,i5,i7 .... not the intel series ^_^
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a b V Motherboard
March 15, 2010 5:14:24 AM

i series is intel lol
And the i series CPUs only support DDR3, they wont run with DDR2 at all, due to the memory controllers built into the CPU die
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March 15, 2010 12:08:32 PM

hahahah yah i forgot to mention the 1156 socket sorry ..... may be my friend has a mistake on checking the spec of the board he told me ^_^
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a c 177 V Motherboard
March 15, 2010 3:19:42 PM

ohh - Pixar -

I forgot to give a 'plug' here... If you want to build on the ideas behind electricity, and understand the 'basics' of the actual components themselves - resistors, capacitors, transistors, and piles of others (which will certainly come in handy during an IT career - it'll give you the basis for comprehending things like cable length limits, circuit 'loading', and the like...), there is a very simply explained, very thoroughly illustrated book by Forrest Mims (who has been writing about electronics pretty much forever [:bilbat:6] !), available from RadioShack called :Getting Started in Electronics" - I highly recommend it, and it's only twenty bucks!
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March 15, 2010 5:18:31 PM

thats a handy for my career extra knowledge for me about electricity ... I'll try to buy that soon i hope we have that book in our country ^_^ ... thanks for the tip bro ^_^
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March 23, 2010 8:45:52 AM

Best answer selected by pixar1942.
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!