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What is the difference between SLP and NSLP versions of Windows 7?

Last response: in Windows 7
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October 4, 2011 6:03:51 PM

Hi,
I bought a computer from CyberPower a couple of years ago, and I recently checked up on the license status for the copy of Windows 7 I got with the computer by running the "slmgr" command, since the dealings I had with CyberPower were not as good as they could have been.

Apparently, my version of windows is "OEM_COA_NSLP". From my research on the matter, it should read "OEM_COA_SLP".

Is it anything to worry about, and if not, what is the difference between "NSLP" and "SLP"? I don't appear to be able to find anything further on the matter.

Thanks in advance!
a b $ Windows 7
October 4, 2011 6:45:21 PM

System locked installation vs non system lock installation

System locked version check with hardware key when installed and usually will not require key input from user if installed on the hardware it is intended to be on. However, key will be need on other hardware, e.g. if replacement mobo is required and manufacturer is unable to provide mobo with same hardware key.

Non system locked version OEM requires key every time and on any hardware, but should be installed on only one and should stay on the same computer (comply with EULA terms).
a b $ Windows 7
October 4, 2011 7:12:37 PM

sounds like you got the better deal
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October 4, 2011 7:28:50 PM

Thanks a lot! Doesn't sound like anything to worry about then.

So if I understand correctly, if you have an SLP version of 7, your mobo goes and you install a new one, Windows 7 won't register, but, if you have an NSLP version and the mobo goes, it would install but would break the EULA, hence you would need a new copy?

My motherboard is in perfect condition at the moment, but it might be helpful to know where I stand with it in the future.
a b $ Windows 7
October 4, 2011 7:45:56 PM

zzzdark said:
Thanks a lot! Doesn't sound like anything to worry about then.

So if I understand correctly, if you have an SLP version of 7, your mobo goes and you install a new one, Windows 7 won't register, but, if you have an NSLP version and the mobo goes, it would install but would break the EULA, hence you would need a new copy?

My motherboard is in perfect condition at the moment, but it might be helpful to know where I stand with it in the future.
If it is a repair replacement, there shouldn't be a problem. You might have to give MS a call to get Windows activated, but it shouldn't be a problem.
October 4, 2011 7:58:54 PM

You wouldn't break the EULA if it is installed on the same "computer". Which the term computer can be a little fuzzy. Microsoft doesn't want to screw you over if you repair your broken PC, but they don't want you to use your OEM copy as a retail copy either.

If you have to repair a broken part and it doesn't register than you can call Microsoft and they will reactivate the key.
October 4, 2011 8:02:30 PM

nordlead said:
You wouldn't break the EULA if it is installed on the same "computer". Which the term computer can be a little fuzzy. Microsoft doesn't want to screw you over if you repair your broken PC, but they don't want you to use your OEM copy as a retail copy either.

If you have to repair a broken part and it doesn't register than you can call Microsoft and they will reactivate the key.


Makes sense.

Thanks for the help everyone!
!