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Does even a little Overclocking results in a hit in longevity?

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December 22, 2011 7:55:16 PM

Hi
when the new Intel CPUs come out I will be looking to build my first home built PC. At that time I will have questions in the appropriate forum for that purpose. But there is a question I have now in regarding how to read the information on motherboards and other new parts as this information becomes available. I am not a gamer but will be building a PC for transcoding videos and as a multimedia PC. I am also very concerned with making my new build last as long as it possibly can. Watching some YouTube videos the motherboad manufacturers feature a featurer of a simple one button overclock mode, that sounds simple enough even for me to do, but will any overclocking even a small amount result in a hit on longevity of the system. I have no need for a gaming computer, but the fastest possible transcoding for the money will be a good thing as long as it does not hurt the longevity of my computer. So I repeat the title of this thread.

Does even a little Overclocking results in a hit in longevity?
a c 197 K Overclocking
December 22, 2011 9:30:48 PM

As long as you stay under manufacturer's max recommended CPU core voltage and under the recommended max temperatures, your system is more likely to become totally obsolete long before it fails from overclocking side effects.
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December 22, 2011 10:08:43 PM

jsc said:
As long as you stay under manufacturer's max recommended CPU core voltage and under the recommended max temperatures, your system is more likely to become totally obsolete long before it fails from overclocking side effects.


So if you buy a good case which includes fans and get a motherboard from a manufacturer like Gigabyte or Asus who claims one switch easy overclocking is there pretty much all there is to it to get a overclock you don't have to worry much about?
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December 23, 2011 1:06:41 PM

The hottest that my 2500K reached @4.8GHz and around 1.4-1.45v was 80-82. The "TJMax" of that processor is 98deg. I have heard that to be extra safe running the processor ~20deg below the TJMax at heavy load will be okay, which is why I backed off the 4.8 overclock and now have it at 4.5. I am using a Hyper 212+ cooler in a Fractal Design Arc Midi case (comes with 3 fans, with room for 6 or 8 total).

Different ways to overclock (these may vary among different mobos, which board are you looking at?):
1. On the ASUS mobo I have, flip the TPU switch to enable the board and BIOS to automatically adjust baseclock, multiplier, and core voltage for overclock of ~4.3GHz. Personally, I have heard a few negative things about messing with the baseclock, but maybe it is perfectly safe. Some people warn against letting the board run auto, as it may use a little more voltage than absolutely necessary for a given clock speed, but if you leave the voltage adjustment on Auto, the voltage will drop down when idling.

2. Adjust the cpu ratio (multiplier) manually, but leave the voltage on full auto.

3. Adjust the cpu ratio manually, and adjust the core voltage manually - this lets you set a voltage, which enables fine-tuning - you may be able to get a stable overclock from less voltage than the board would apply automatically. Note: if you manually enter in a core voltage value that is what the system will run at all the time - the voltage will not step down along with the clock speed when idling.

4. Adjust the cpu ratio manually, apply an offset to the voltage; I tried this, but even the smallest increment offset somehow lowered the voltage more than it should have, and I wasn't getting stable overclocks.

5. There are a whole slew of other adjustments like changing your DRAM timings, and load line calibration - I leave all that stuff on the default values for now.
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a c 197 K Overclocking
December 25, 2011 4:07:15 AM

in66732 said:
So if you buy a good case which includes fans and get a motherboard from a manufacturer like Gigabyte or Asus who claims one switch easy overclocking is there pretty much all there is to it to get a overclock you don't have to worry much about?

Not necessarily. The problem with most automatic and semi-automatic overclocking schemes is that they sometimes set the voltges unneccassarily high. Learning to overclock from the BIOS is always better.

Now, the K's are relatively simple to overclock because you can set the memory speed to 1333 or 1600 MHz and leave it alone. Then you pretty much work with just the internal multiplier and CPU core voltage.
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December 25, 2011 5:08:15 AM

This is good advice. I recommend offsetting the voltage while adjusting the CPU ratio (multiplier). To achieve 4.6GHz with lower voltages than auto produced, I first offset by a negative amount. This led to unstable overclocks. So, I went the other way and applied a positive (+) offset, and that seems to work the best, I have found. Leaving it on auto, the BIOS wanted to apply ~1.38v or so to hit 4.6GHz. With the (+) voltage offset (I did .050, in this case), I was hitting the same overclock with ~1.304-1.312v, and sub-70 temps after running Prime95 for a couple of hours. I think I like the offset method the best, because it allows the voltage to scale back down when the processor idles.

After tuning the multiplier and voltage, you could try other things like adjusting the timings on your RAM, if you really wanted to experiment more, but I haven't tried any of that yet, so I am not sure of the advantages.
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December 26, 2011 8:14:20 PM

My initial goals in trying this overclocking stuff is to initially possibly build a new system for CPU transcoding only.(Not even getting a video card and using onboard or CPU graphics.) The reason I say this is the primary purpose of this system will be transcoding MP2 transports stream videos from my computer television tuner to another high-definition format more suitable for archiving because of its smaller size will be the primary purpose of this system. I am saying CPU only because articles written on this site and others say GPU transcoding isn't there yet for high quality high definition to high definition. So I am wondering does that put this discussion in a different light?

I have some other questions as well. We'll overclocking always give you a good bang for the buck? I am thinking of getting the next generation I5 processor by Intel when it comes out. But I do not know if even for transcoding, not gaming, it is always better to move up to the next more powerful processor rather than over clocking? As the next generation Intel processors become available the old ones and motherboards may be discounted.

If I do decide to our clock I thought that buying one of the NZXT Hades cases, found at this URL http://www.amazon.com/NZXT-Hades-Black-Crafted-Mid-Towe... , would be a good way to go because they give a lot of fans for the dollar as well as a controller and LED temperature monitoring. So I'm wondering what you think of this unit? Would this unit be all that would be needed for CPU overclocking only as far as cooling was concerned? Also will it's temperature sensing precludes the need for a motherboard with as many fan headers as fans?

I'm also wondering after doing a few transcode watching the system closely, monitoring the temperatures, could I assume other transcoding will have very similar demands on my new system and feel free to stop monitoring the system closely while doing transcode allowing me to go in the other room and watch videos on my old computer while the new computer does its overclock and transcoding thing without ruining itself because of getting too hot?
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a c 197 K Overclocking
December 28, 2011 6:08:52 AM

If I weer going to get a case costing less that $100, I get one of these:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Overclocking will let you do two things:
1. Stretch the useful service life of a system.
2. Increase the performance one or two speed bins beyond stock.

I stress test my overclocked systems for 24 hours with Prime95. Puts a 100% load on all the cores in the CPU. About 15 minutes of that will drive core temps to the max. After that, I go into BIOS in the PC Health tab and set the thermal warning to 70 C. The system will generate BIOS type beeps if it overheats.
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December 30, 2011 8:34:33 AM

jsc said:
If I weer going to get a case costing less that $100, I get one of these:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


In another thread on the forums entitled: "Gaming Build Advice for a first time builder"

There is part of a reply that states
Quote:
geofelt
Cases are a personal thing. For adequate cooling, you only need one with two 120mm intake fans or equivalent. A perfectly adequate case might be the Antec 100/200/300 cases. But, research cases and be prepared to spend extra to get one that appeals to you. You will not regret it. You will be seeing and touching it every day for this build, and several more.

In still another thread on the forums entitled: "LGA 1156 Core i5 and Core i7 Overclocking guide"

It is stated and pictured

- CoolerMaster Hyper 212 Plus has great performance for the cost.


May I draw the inference from geofelt opinion 2 120 mm fans being adequate and jsc opinion that the "COOLER MASTER RC-692-KKN2 CM690 II" was superior to the case I asked about that heavy case fanning is not the way to go for overclocking, but CPU cooling is the way to go to overclock a CPU?
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a c 197 K Overclocking
December 30, 2011 10:22:50 AM

No. Not what I said. And not what the poster meant about the 212+ (although I do agree with him).

First (in sort of backwards order), there are plenty of coolers better than the 212+. But they all cost significantly more.
http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm
The 212+ is not even in the top 10. And everything that is costs more.

Second, you need a combination of a good cooler and good airflow threough the case. Once the cooler extracts the heat from the CPU, the airflow through the case removes the warm air from the case. This will require several fans.

I use Antec 900 cases. They come with 4 fans - three 120 mm fans (2 front, 1 rear) and one 200 mm fan on top. It also has provisions for adding a side fan. I did some testing, and in my case, adding the side fan had an adverse effect on cooling.

Third, I said that if I were going to get a case costing less than $100, I'd get a CM690II. I wouldn't get an NZXT case, but that is personal preference.
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January 16, 2012 10:27:39 AM

jsc said:

First (in sort of backwards order), there are plenty of coolers better than the 212+. But they all cost significantly more.
http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm
The 212+ is not even in the top 10. And everything that is costs more.

Thanks for those replies.

I have a few more questions is the link you gave me to the top coolers a consolidated list that includes water coolers if there were any in the top rankings or water coolers a step above in their own category? if so is there any consolidated rankings you know?

Another question is when you look at benchmarks to see how much overclocking might help you are you looking at the turbo speed or the non-turbo speed. If the reason you're thinking of building a new PC is to transcode from high-definition to smaller size (because of the codec) high definition and you expect to be doing this in a transcoding queue having these transcode's take place one after another for a long period of time. Is that something that would make the improvement from from stock speed to overclock looks smaller because the benchmarks are based on peak speeds that can only be achieved for small periods of time without superior cooling as you do when you deal with overclocking?
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a b K Overclocking
January 16, 2012 12:26:15 PM

I personally don't like Frostytechs reviews, I tend to leave them as a last resort.

I would always tend to lean towards Xbitlabs and other similar sites that cover all hardware.

Heatsink reveiws are erratic anyway - depends on application of Thermal Paste, different room temperatures, etc etc - so I look at 3 - 5 reveiws of one cooler before making my decision.

In terms of case choice, I agree with jsc, the CM690II is probably one of the best sub $100 cases. I would lean more towards the Antec 300 Illusion if you can pick one up for ~$100 though. Either one is a good choice.
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January 16, 2012 9:44:14 PM

Well I have additional questions as to what has been said immediately above which I may ask after I get some dinner in me. But right now the question I seem to be asking and asking without an answer is do you meet superior cooling like you do when overclocking just to get continuous turbo speed performance and an application that can take advantage 4 core and multi-threading on the long continuous basis.
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