Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Could I have decreased 2500k lifespan?

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
December 29, 2011 6:54:47 AM

I had a half decent cooler previously.

When I was overclocking to 4.5GHz I used prime95 and IBT.

In total i used prime95 for about 24 hours and IBT for about 5 separate 20 passes of maximum memory (circa 8GB).


In prime95 i would see temps close to 80, but on average was in the low to mid 70s.


In IBT the temps where in the high 70s, and reached a maximum of 85c and was over 80c for about 20 minutes.


I also spent about 30 hours playing games with an average temperature of about 60c.



Now I have changed cooling method and never go above 55c.



I am wondering whether I could have damaged this chip or reduced it's lifespan noticeably, or if there is nothing to worry about?


Thanks.
December 29, 2011 7:04:32 AM

Nope your all good home boy! Although that is a little warm for an i5 that won't damage it, if it got really dangerous you would have blue screened!
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 29, 2011 7:05:16 AM

it's all fine you did a better job to decrease the temps so don't be in worry!
Related resources
December 29, 2011 7:08:24 AM

Cool thanks very much guys, moved down to 4GHz and getting temps always in 40s instead of 55c with 4.5.

Just need the processor to last about 2 years, so wanted to play it safe and there doesn't seem to be much of a bottleneck @4Ghz anyway.


Will give you thumbs up for the help because can't select best answer.
a c 95 à CPUs
a c 224 K Overclocking
December 30, 2011 1:54:43 PM

It has a 3 year warranty.
December 30, 2011 2:44:04 PM

4Ryan6 said:
It has a 3 year warranty.


Does Overclocking still void warrentys? Seems like it's getting easier and easier.
December 30, 2011 3:10:20 PM

I believe the warranty stands as long as you are not running the processor beyond Intel's stated "specifications". This includes a max voltage limit of ~1.5 or 1.52v (double check this number, I think it is on Intel's site somewhere). When you are overclocking, if you keep the core voltages below that, the warranty is not voided. Of course, I don't think Intel has anyway to prove that someone with a prematurely burnt out processor ran it at a certain high voltage....
a c 95 à CPUs
a c 224 K Overclocking
December 30, 2011 10:41:55 PM

Logically how can Intel prove you overclocked a CPU that overclocks itself with turbo Mode?

There are 2 main ways Intel can get out of honoring a warranty.

#1 You RMA the original boxed heat sink cooler back to Intel with the returned CPU (as Intel requires) that was never used, to melt the thermal compound that was factory applied to the heat sink base.

#2 You use a voltage range that damages the CPUs internal electrical pathways and Intel already knows the CPU can handle 1.520v, so if you exceed that voltage and fry it up, they'll know you voltage overclocked past the CPUs rating.

Your motherboard overclocked settings are not imprinted on the CPU so there's really no way for Intel to 100% prove you overclocked unless you over volted as mentioned in #2.

December 31, 2011 10:33:19 AM

4Ryan6 said:
Logically how can Intel prove you overclocked a CPU that overclocks itself with turbo Mode?

There are 2 main ways Intel can get out of honoring a warranty.

#1 You RMA the original boxed heat sink cooler back to Intel with the returned CPU (as Intel requires) that was never used, to melt the thermal compound that was factory applied to the heat sink base.

#2 You use a voltage range that damages the CPUs internal electrical pathways and Intel already knows the CPU can handle 1.520v, so if you exceed that voltage and fry it up, they'll know you voltage overclocked past the CPUs rating.

Your motherboard overclocked settings are not imprinted on the CPU so there's really no way for Intel to 100% prove you overclocked unless you over volted as mentioned in #2.


Therefore make sure it never goes over 1.5 and if you sent it back rub the thermal compound?
a c 95 à CPUs
a c 224 K Overclocking
December 31, 2011 2:16:36 PM

majorgibly said:
Therefore make sure it never goes over 1.5 and if you sent it back rub the thermal compound?


Actually it's a good practice to run the stock heat sink first and melt the thermal compound allowing a good seating before swapping to any after market CPU cooling solution, unless Intel has changed their RMA policy you have to send a Boxed 3 yr warrantied CPU back in the Intel box it came in, along with the heat sink that came with the CPU.

Like I said unless Intel has changed their RMA policy since the socket 775 the box has coded labeling that matches the heat sink and the CPU.

A THGF user learned that the hard way as he bought an aftermarket cooler and gave the Intel cooler away to a friend, then had a CPU failure and had to get the stock cooler back to qualify for the RMA being approved and not rejected.

None of us even had a clue Intel required that until it happened to him.

So I'm assuming that is still Intels policy.
!