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How do I Set Up RAID 0

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a b Ĉ ASUS
a b $ Windows 7
a c 324 V Motherboard
March 16, 2010 3:09:14 PM

Since I have two identical 250GB HDDs, a mobo (Asus P5N-E 650i-SLI) that supports RAID, and a new copy of windows 7 x64, I thought it would be a logical time to experiment with RAID 0. But I don't have a clue as to where to start. Do I just enable RAID in BIOS and fresh install Win 7 from DVD... or is it more complicated than that? I hope someone here can enlighten this old guy.

If more info is needed for an answer, I will gladly provide it. I just didn't want to get too long-winded to start with...

More about : set raid

March 16, 2010 3:18:39 PM

I've never installed raid 0, but I've read about it in youtube and other forums because I was contemplating to do it. In the end I decided not to because I only bought one hardrive.

You have to setup raid 0 in bios before installing the Windows OS because all data in harddrive after "Raid 0 setup" will be erased.

You must press the "Del" button or whatever buttons your screen asks you to press while your computer (not windows, but your computer) is starting.

My motherboard's manual told me the detailed steps to do raid 0 but each setup is different according to motherboard.

I would "start" by typing "Raid 0 setup/confige" or "how to raid 0" in youtube.com It should give you an excellent idea about raid0 setup. I would recommend you do this before you even start reading your manual. Some videos there are really nice.

Note: I just bought my computer and I'm a nub. So also take second opinion please.

hope this works for you though. GL.
March 16, 2010 4:15:37 PM

I would "start" by typing "Raid 0 setup/confige" or "how to raid 0" in youtube.com


Hi aymanzone Iam sorry but youtube isn't search engine i can understand www.google.com
Related resources
March 16, 2010 4:21:20 PM

youtube.com yield video results. They were very helpful for me.
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b $ Windows 7
a c 324 V Motherboard
March 16, 2010 4:30:52 PM

aymanzone said:
I've never installed raid 0, but I've read about it in youtube and other forums because I was contemplating to do it. In the end I decided not to because I only bought one hardrive.

You have to setup raid 0 in bios before installing the Windows OS because all data in harddrive after "Raid 0 setup" will be erased.

You must press the "Del" button or whatever buttons your screen asks you to press while your computer (not windows, but your computer) is starting.

My motherboard's manual told me the detailed steps to do raid 0 but each setup is different according to motherboard.

I would "start" by typing "Raid 0 setup/confige" or "how to raid 0" in youtube.com It should give you an excellent idea about raid0 setup. I would recommend you do this before you even start reading your manual. Some videos there are really nice.

Note: I just bought my computer and I'm a nub. So also take second opinion please.

hope this works for you though. GL.


Thanks. I did find one rather informative video that basically says to turn it on in BIOS, configure it after save/exit, and run the Win7 install. But it raised another question. What's this RAID driver disk? Do I need one? I thought win 7 has these built-in.
March 16, 2010 8:08:58 PM


Quote:
I thought win 7 has these built-in.


Win7 does not have any raid 0 driver builtin.


Quote:
What's this RAID driver disk? Do I need one?



A raid 0 driver disk is not a special disk. If you want to use Raid 0, you have to buy two harddisks (not one, but two hardisks). For example you would buy two 500G byte harddisks or say two 320G byte hardisks. They should be exactly identical, therefore buy them with same size, or to be sure, just buy them from same company and make sure they have the exact same features.


GL
a b $ Windows 7
a b V Motherboard
March 16, 2010 9:57:29 PM

I just did this.

Read your manual (online?) about RAID setup.

You can download the driver from Asus, or Intel (Intel Matrix Storage manager?). be sure to get the driver FOR YOUR CHIPSET!

During boot up, go into the BIOS and set your hard drives to RAID, then upon boot up, hit <CTRL>+<I> to go into RAID setup, all menus are (pretty much) self explainitory.

Before installation of you OS, you need to copy the RAID driver to a flash drive (or floopy), to be installed during the OS installation. This is done when it asks you where to would like to install the OS. Look for the "install driver" or "install 3rd party driver" on the screen. Point it to your driver.

AND Windows 7 DOES have the RAID driver (for my chipset: ICR10H), but I still used the downloaded one, as it was more up to date. I know anything pre Windows 7 doesn't.

BE WARNED: When you set up the BIOS for RAID, then set up RAID, you will loose everything on your hard drives! Don't do this until you already have the driver!

Good Luck.
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b $ Windows 7
a c 324 V Motherboard
March 16, 2010 10:59:18 PM

Thanks everyone. In a couple days when I have the time I will tackle the experiment. Btw, I just read elsewhere that Win 7 does have the necessary 64-bit drivers for nVraid built-in for my 650i's chipset.
a b $ Windows 7
a b V Motherboard
March 17, 2010 12:09:44 AM

This is way over simple, but here goes.
Set your controller in your BIOS to RAID, exit the BIOS, reboot.
When you reboot, you will now see a new line during POST that will say something like "Press ctrl-8 to enter the RAID BIOS" or along those lines. Different board makers will say different things. Press the combination of keys when prompted and you are now in the the RAID Controller BIOS.
This is where you select the type of array you want, add the drives you want to use in the array, and actually build the array.
Exit the RAID BIOS and reboot.
Enter the regular BIOS again. Now you have an array to work with, the array you built you be displayed to the BIOS as a single drive, called something like SCSI device array, or something similar, again, each board maker and each BIOS is slightly different, but it will be there. Set it to bootable, or as storage. If you set it as bootable, then you must put it in the boot order, just like any other drive.
Insert the Win 7 install disk and reboot. It should have the drivers, find the array, and allow you to start your OS installation to the array.
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b $ Windows 7
a c 324 V Motherboard
March 17, 2010 2:24:16 AM

jitpublisher said:
This is way over simple, but here goes.
Set your controller in your BIOS to RAID, exit the BIOS, reboot.
When you reboot, you will now see a new line during POST that will say something like "Press ctrl-8 to enter the RAID BIOS" or along those lines. Different board makers will say different things. Press the combination of keys when prompted and you are now in the the RAID Controller BIOS.
This is where you select the type of array you want, add the drives you want to use in the array, and actually build the array.
Exit the RAID BIOS and reboot.
Enter the regular BIOS again. Now you have an array to work with, the array you built you be displayed to the BIOS as a single drive, called something like SCSI device array, or something similar, again, each board maker and each BIOS is slightly different, but it will be there. Set it to bootable, or as storage. If you set it as bootable, then you must put it in the boot order, just like any other drive.
Insert the Win 7 install disk and reboot. It should have the drivers, find the array, and allow you to start your OS installation to the array.

Ahh! Now my MediaShield User's Guide is starting to make sense. Thanks.
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b $ Windows 7
a c 324 V Motherboard
March 19, 2010 10:30:58 PM

Just thought I'd add that the transition to RAID 0 went embarrassingly easy. Thanks for all the advice. While my Windows Experience Index still shows my HDD rating at 5.9, The fact of the matter is that Win 7 seems to be much quicker now. Much more responsive. For instance; my bootup time has decreased, and I've noticed that FF loads in about half the time. Can't wait to try gaming...
a b $ Windows 7
a b V Motherboard
March 20, 2010 1:49:13 PM

That is because 5.9 is the highest rating Windows uses. The Windows experience tool is not meant for benchmarking, it is simply to let you know if you will "enjoy" your Windows experience. If it says 5.9, that means you will enjoy it to the "fullest" that Microsoft believes anyone should enjoy using their product. For whatever that is worth! But that number beyond that, does mean a single thing, pay very little attention to it.

To get a solid idea of how your array is doing, download a small free program called HD Tune and run it. It will measure you drive or RAID arrays actual read/write speeds, data transfer rates both sustained and burst speed, and access times.
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b $ Windows 7
a c 324 V Motherboard
March 20, 2010 2:34:45 PM

jitpublisher said:
That is because 5.9 is the highest rating Windows uses. The Windows experience tool is not meant for benchmarking, it is simply to let you know if you will "enjoy" your Windows experience. If it says 5.9, that means you will enjoy it to the "fullest" that Microsoft believes anyone should enjoy using their product. For whatever that is worth! But that number beyond that, does mean a single thing, pay very little attention to it.

To get a solid idea of how your array is doing, download a small free program called HD Tune and run it. It will measure you drive or RAID arrays actual read/write speeds, data transfer rates both sustained and burst speed, and access times.

Hey, thanks for the tip. I'll try that pgm. Btw, Win 7 has increased their max WEI ratings from 1.0 - 5.9 to 1.0 - 7.9 now. For instance, my Graphics rating is 7.3, Memory/Processor are 7.2 So, I'm not sure that's necessarily correct about 5.9 being the highest for HDD's anymore....
a b $ Windows 7
a b V Motherboard
March 20, 2010 7:06:48 PM

clutchc said:
Hey, thanks for the tip. I'll try that pgm. Btw, Win 7 has increased their max WEI ratings from 1.0 - 5.9 to 1.0 - 7.9 now. For instance, my Graphics rating is 7.3, Memory/Processor are 7.2 So, I'm not sure that's necessarily correct about 5.9 being the highest for HDD's anymore....


Ah, didn't know that! Thanks for the Win 7 WEI tip.
!