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X58 is THE ONE TO GET if you have the means.

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December 15, 2009 11:47:12 PM

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-gulftown-westmer...

This article alone should make ppl that are about to buy a new PC and motherboard that an X58 is well worth the extra $50. The core i7920 is still a great chip and reasonable. This PC when built will at last at least 2-4more years than the P55's lifespan... that alone should be well worth it. I've said this more than 20 times in various posts because it is truly worth it if you have the means and perhaps a little extra($100 or so for i7920$50 more, and $50 more for the motherboard over a P55)......

More about : x58 means

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December 16, 2009 12:25:42 AM

liquidsnake718 said:
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-gulftown-westmer...

This article alone should make ppl that are about to buy a new PC and motherboard that an X58 is well worth the extra $50. The core i7920 is still a great chip and reasonable. This PC when built will at last at least 2-4more years than the P55's lifespan... that alone should be well worth it. I've said this more than 20 times in various posts because it is truly worth it if you have the means and perhaps a little extra($100 or so for i7920$50 more, and $50 more for the motherboard over a P55)......


x58 is not the right system for everyone......

Quote:
This PC when built will at last at least 2-4more years than the P55's lifespan...


Question, How do you know that the x58 will last 2+ years longer than the p55? In life cycle, the p55 was just release 3 months ago... intel probably has lots of plans for the p55 but not a lot of info been released about more powerful cpu's.

Quote:
that alone should be well worth it. I've said this more than 20 times in various posts because it is truly worth it if you have the means and perhaps a little extra($100 or so for i7920$50 more, and $50 more for the motherboard over a P55)......


Maybe. maybe not.

Really, most people don't need the power of the i7's from either platforms. Although if you do need the i7's power, then p55 i7 maybe better under a different task than i7 on the x58 and ect.

Examples:

X58:
C.A.D really benefits from the triple channel memory bandwidth the x58 offers

p55:
video editing/converting would run better here due to higher stock speeds and an aggressive turbo boost.

EDIT:

About the gulftown cpu, unless you running professional applications, gulftown would not be even worth getting until the common applications start using at least 4 threads on a daily usage.
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December 16, 2009 12:39:41 AM

warmon6 said:
...gulftown would not be even worth getting until the common applications start using at least 4 threads on a daily usage.


Yeah, like Minesweeper. :) 
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December 16, 2009 1:19:31 AM

liquidsnake718 said:
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-gulftown-westmer...

This article alone should make ppl that are about to buy a new PC and motherboard that an X58 is well worth the extra $50. The core i7920 is still a great chip and reasonable. This PC when built will at last at least 2-4more years than the P55's lifespan... that alone should be well worth it. I've said this more than 20 times in various posts because it is truly worth it if you have the means and perhaps a little extra($100 or so for i7920$50 more, and $50 more for the motherboard over a P55)......


Well I do agree, the 1366/X58 platform will most likley live longer due to new CPU's being released for it however you need to consider that the 1156/p55 platform was released just recently and Intel will most likley be updating hardware in that platform and has future plans for it as another poster said here.
However just because a platform is at its End-of-life doesn't mean you need to throw it away and immediatly upgrade...i bet that the far majority of people still use Core2Dou's and Core2Quads whether it be in the businiss or consumer sector. And if you mean that an actual 1366 build will last longer in terms of lifespan you are wrong, what makes you think an x58 board will last more years than a p55 board...thier reliablity is not preset( the actualy hardware no the platform's life). Moreover, the P55/1156 platform with the current i5 satisifies a huge majority, the i7920 w/ its triple channel ram is really only required for some crazy applications that are designed for it which include AutoCad, Photoshop, programming...etc gaming really isn't anywhere on this list and neither is any other popular daily used application. I don't want to be labeled a hypocrite because i got an i7920 but i did just because i can and wanted to have some fun as well and I do multitasking and photoshopping.
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December 16, 2009 8:14:43 AM

warmon6 said:
Examples:

X58:
C.A.D really benefits from the triple channel memory bandwidth the x58 offers

p55:
video editing/converting would run better here due to higher stock speeds and an aggressive turbo boost.


You'll more likely find video work is better on X58 because of the triple channel RAM too. Standard-definition video will benefit from just having a higher clock speed because there's not a massive memory requirement, but HD and heavy-duty encoding is more memory dependant because of the sheer amount of information being processed.

But basically yes, if you use your computer for professional media purposes X58 is the way to go, if not you'd be more than fine with P55 (but save some cash and don't both with i7 8xx)
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December 16, 2009 11:59:40 AM

The new Gulftown processor (32nm, six cores) that is compatible with some of the new X58 motherboards (ASUS P6X58D Premium) is a transition processor that signals the X58 platform is over the hill. X58 motherboards will still be around for at least a year. This processor will most likely be priced close to $900.

The i9 processors, also 32nm and six cores, will use a new motherboard.

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December 16, 2009 12:36:25 PM

Gulftown is what was rumored to be called I9. It seems Intel is not going to use that naming scheme now. The 6 core processor will use the 1366 platform and continue to be called I7's.
http://www.fudzilla.com/content/view/16828/35/
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December 16, 2009 12:39:54 PM

notty22 said:
Gulftown is what was rumored to be called I9. It seems Intel is not going to use that naming scheme now. The 6 core processor will use the 1366 platform and continue to be called I7's.
http://www.fudzilla.com/content/view/16828/35/


Your a day late and a dollar short. ;)  *looks at link op has*
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December 16, 2009 12:47:32 PM

warmon6 said:
Your a day late and a dollar short. ;)  *looks at link op has*

My comment was to "correct" dupaul's post that there were two different future products.
A 32nm 6 core Gultown and a I9 that would need a new m/b.
They are one in the same.
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December 16, 2009 1:05:50 PM

notty22 said:
My comment was to "correct" dupaul's post that there were two different future products.
A 32nm 6 core Gultown and a I9 that would need a new m/b.
They are one in the same.


Ahhh...... sorry about that. I didn't make that connection.
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December 16, 2009 3:35:10 PM

LePhuronn said:
You'll more likely find video work is better on X58 because of the triple channel RAM too.
Not significantly. Uncompressed HD video at 1920 x 1080 x 30fps requires a bandwidth of less than 200MB/sec. EACH DDR3 channel has a peak bandwidth of about 8000MB/sec. So even uncompressed HD video requires only about 1.5% of a two-channel memory controller's capacity versus about 0.9% of a three-channel controller's. Compared to the other work the CPU has to do in order to manipulate the data stream (particularly if you're encoding or decoding the video), the memory component is pretty insignificant.
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December 16, 2009 8:41:01 PM

I called the new gulftown processor i7-980X (32nm, six cores) a transition processor for the X58 platform in much the same way the Core2Quad processor was a transition processor for the P45 platform. It signaled the end of the current platform.

By this I mean, that Intel introduced the Core2Quad processors for the P45 platform about a year before it's useful life was ended by the introduction of i5-750 and i7-860 Quad Core processors for the P55 platform.

In much the same way, the X58 platform has about another year of useful life (it already is over one year old), before Intel introduces i9 processors for the X68 motherboards.
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December 30, 2009 1:54:27 AM

warmon6 said:
x58 is not the right system for everyone......



Really, most people don't need the power of the i7's from either platforms. Although if you do need the i7's power, then p55 i7 maybe better under a different task than i7 on the x58 and ect.

Examples:

X58:
C.A.D really benefits from the triple channel memory bandwidth the x58 offers

p55:
video editing/converting would run better here due to higher stock speeds and an aggressive turbo boost.
.


The i7 920 can easily be overclocked to those clocked speeds you are talking about to about 3.8-4.0ghz from 2.66ghz, so there is no problem for video editing. Plus the X58 has turbo boost AND hyper threading as it was the first to impliment it. It also uses both 16lanes or even more of Pcie2.0 so the gpus can connect directly to the cpu and impliment full SLI or even triple and 4 cards can be used.
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December 30, 2009 3:43:49 AM

liquidsnake718 said:
The i7 920 can easily be overclocked to those clocked speeds you are talking about to about 3.8-4.0ghz from 2.66ghz, so there is no problem for video editing. Plus the X58 has turbo boost AND hyper threading as it was the first to impliment it. It also uses both 16lanes or even more of Pcie2.0 so the gpus can connect directly to the cpu and impliment full SLI or even triple and 4 cards can be used.


Yeah but you can put 2 5970s in a P55 and get about a 3% performance hit, not worth mentioning. Also you can get a good P55 board for $120, dual chanel DDR3 for $90, and the X3440 for $230 and as apposed to a cheap X58 board for $160, triple channel DDR3 for at least $140, and an i7 820 for $290. You save $130 on the P55 build and only lose triple channel DDR3 which is useless 99% of the time. $130 can go a long way.
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December 30, 2009 4:09:32 AM

I personally think that both systems are great buys and that both will live for a while.

If it were me though I would choose a x58 based on the CPU itself. I feel that a Core i7 920 itself will last longer than anything below it performance wise. Its the high end enthusiast part. And its not that bad in price really.
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December 30, 2009 5:00:39 AM

And in other news...

in before flame war.
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December 30, 2009 5:04:16 AM

dpaul8 said:
I called the new gulftown processor i7-980X (32nm, six cores) a transition processor for the X58 platform in much the same way the Core2Quad processor was a transition processor for the P45 platform. It signaled the end of the current platform.

By this I mean, that Intel introduced the Core2Quad processors for the P45 platform about a year before it's useful life was ended by the introduction of i5-750 and i7-860 Quad Core processors for the P55 platform.

In much the same way, the X58 platform has about another year of useful life (it already is over one year old), before Intel introduces i9 processors for the X68 motherboards.

Honestly, you're just guessing here. Intel has not officially announced any i9 processors, and even if they do announce an X68, that is by no means a guarantee that the x58 will be incompatible (for example, many P35 and X38 boards fully supported all of the 45nm Core 2s, even after X48 and P45 were available).
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December 30, 2009 10:56:21 AM

X58 will support Gulftown but X58 boards may not. It's up to the manufacturer to add the required microcode to the BIOS.
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December 30, 2009 2:31:12 PM

randomizer said:
X58 will support Gulftown but X58 boards may not. It's up to the manufacturer to add the required microcode to the BIOS.


And here's hoping you didn't buy a cheap one that can't supply the power needed.
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December 30, 2009 4:13:54 PM

AMW1011 said:
And here's hoping you didn't buy a cheap one that can't supply the power needed.

I'm pretty sure Gulftown uses less power than Bloomfield.
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December 30, 2009 6:31:10 PM

cjl said:
I'm pretty sure Gulftown uses less power than Bloomfield.


Well I figure when we went from 65nm duals to 45nm quads we got old 65nm duals that had a TDP of 65w and 45nm quads that had 95w TDP at best. From that example I believe the best we can hope for is that they will run about the same.
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December 30, 2009 9:01:48 PM

AMW1011 said:
Well I figure when we went from 65nm duals to 45nm quads we got old 65nm duals that had a TDP of 65w and 45nm quads that had 95w TDP at best. From that example I believe the best we can hope for is that they will run about the same.

From dual to quad is a doubling of the core count, while 4 -> 6 is only a 50% boost. Besides, I'm going based on some tests I've seen, not just guesses. I'm pretty sure they showed an overall reduction of power when going from a bloomfield to a gulftown (though I think the TDP rating is the same).
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December 30, 2009 9:41:28 PM

AMW1011 said:
And here's hoping you didn't buy a cheap one that can't supply the power needed.

I bought the cheapest damn board I could find :) 
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December 30, 2009 11:36:42 PM

randomizer said:
I bought the cheapest damn board I could find :) 


and your proud of it! :lol: 
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December 30, 2009 11:51:43 PM

Absolutely. I saved $40.
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December 31, 2009 12:05:42 AM

so gulftowns are still more reliable in terms of power? Compared to the Lynnfield?
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December 31, 2009 12:36:29 AM

Reliable?
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Best solution

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December 31, 2009 2:11:50 AM

AMW1011 said:
Yeah but you can put 2 5970s in a P55 and get about a 3% performance hit, not worth mentioning. Also you can get a good P55 board for $120, dual chanel DDR3 for $90, and the X3440 for $230 and as apposed to a cheap X58 board for $160, triple channel DDR3 for at least $140, and an i7 820 for $290. You save $130 on the P55 build and only lose triple channel DDR3 which is useless 99% of the time. $130 can go a long way.



+1


liquidsnake718 said:
The i7 920 can easily be overclocked to those clocked speeds you are talking about to about 3.8-4.0ghz from 2.66ghz, so there is no problem for video editing. Plus the X58 has turbo boost AND hyper threading as it was the first to impliment it. It also uses both 16lanes or even more of Pcie2.0 so the gpus can connect directly to the cpu and impliment full SLI or even triple and 4 cards can be used.


Yes im fully aware that the 920 can be overclocked to 4+ GHz and the the x58 motherboards can run full dual pci-e 16x bandwidth. Although there other things to considered.

Not everyone will be, know how, or is comfortable overclocking a cpu . So with that being said, if you look at what i have said above, depending on what your doing, a P55 can be better or a x58 can be better.


You are right that X58 is the first one to implement turbo boost although the x58 cpu turbo boost is not as aggressive as the p55 cpus as i stated earlier.

Core i5 750: 3.2 GHz in dual and single core mode.

Core i7 920: 2.8 GHz single core mode.


For pci-e, as AMW1011 said, Even the most powerful graphic cards of today are hardly affected between PCI-e x8 and x16. there even some benchmarks showing there little difference between x8 and x4 with 5870

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/HD_5870_PCI-Expr...

Were probably going to need to wait for a generation or 2 of GPUs to come though before we fully use PCI-e x16 2.0 bandwidth. Although by the time that happens, we maybe using PCI-e 3.0.

All in truth. If your just gaming, your better off saving money by getting a phenom II x2/3 or soon to be core i3 than core i7 as majority of todays games run only run on 2 threads. That save money can be used for a better gpu.
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December 31, 2009 4:06:22 AM

AMW1011 said:
Well I figure when we went from 65nm duals to 45nm quads we got old 65nm duals that had a TDP of 65w and 45nm quads that had 95w TDP at best. From that example I believe the best we can hope for is that they will run about the same.


Actually all test point towards Gulftown using less power at the same clock speed as a Core i7 quad does. Not as much less as a QX^850 vs a QX9650 but still less.

32nm + second gen HKMG makes a huge difference in TDP.

warmon6 said:
+1




Yes im fully aware that the 920 can be overclocked to 4+ GHz and the the x58 motherboards can run full dual pci-e 16x bandwidth. Although there other things to considered.

Not everyone will be, know how, or is comfortable overclocking a cpu . So with that being said, if you look at what i have said above, depending on what your doing, a P55 can be better or a x58 can be better.


You are right that X58 is the first one to implement turbo boost although the x58 cpu turbo boost is not as aggressive as the p55 cpus as i stated earlier.

Core i5 750: 3.2 GHz in dual and single core mode.

Core i7 920: 2.8 GHz single core mode.


For pci-e, as AMW1011 said, Even the most powerful graphic cards of today are hardly affected between PCI-e x8 and x16. there even some benchmarks showing there little difference between x8 and x4 with 5870

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/HD_5870_PCI-Expr...

Were probably going to need to wait for a generation or 2 of GPUs to come though before we fully use PCI-e x16 2.0 bandwidth. Although by the time that happens, we maybe using PCI-e 3.0.

All in truth. If your just gaming, your better off saving money by getting a phenom II x2/3 or soon to be core i3 than core i7 as majority of todays games run only run on 2 threads. That save money can be used for a better gpu.


The turbo itself is more CPU based, not chipset based. A i3 has no turbo on it but is LGA 1156. A i5+ does.

I bet any 32nm Core i7s will have the better turbo in them.

As for PCIe, I bet we just now hit the peak bandwidth of AGP 8x. PCIe 1.1 8x is still not fully saturated. Probably will never be until PCIe gen 4 comes out or 4-6 gens of GPUs.

As for CPUs, I still tell people to get a quad. Mainly so that Windows Vista+ can assign two to games and the rest to any other programs.
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December 31, 2009 8:02:52 AM

I agree with Warmon6. i5 does have better Turbo mode implementation than i7, and it does run cooler as well. So if you're a gamer, i5 is the obvious better choice. However, if you're also into CPU intensive tasks such as video editing or folding at home, i7 is still better mainly due to the Hyper Threading.

All in all, it all depends on your application.
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December 31, 2009 4:56:09 PM

I've always found the 16 lane PCI-E argument to be a little redundant tbh. Yes, you may only see a 3% performance hit with a pair of 5970s on P55 but the type of person who spends the cash on such an extreme Crossfire setup isn't going to make such a concession - if you're spending $1,200 on GPUs then what's a few dollars more for X58?

There really is no argument to be had: X58 is an extreme platform for people who want extreme performance. If you're not running crazy GPU setups at maximum performance then you don't need X58. If you're not running masses of memory for intensive operations then you don't need X58. If you're not interested in overclocking then you don't need X58.

But if you want any of those things then X58 is where to go. Surely it's that simple?
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December 31, 2009 5:19:43 PM

LePhuronn said:
I've always found the 16 lane PCI-E argument to be a little redundant tbh. Yes, you may only see a 3% performance hit with a pair of 5970s on P55 but the type of person who spends the cash on such an extreme Crossfire setup isn't going to make such a concession - if you're spending $1,200 on GPUs then what's a few dollars more for X58?

There really is no argument to be had: X58 is an extreme platform for people who want extreme performance. If you're not running crazy GPU setups at maximum performance then you don't need X58. If you're not running masses of memory for intensive operations then you don't need X58. If you're not interested in overclocking then you don't need X58.

But if you want any of those things then X58 is where to go. Surely it's that simple?


True but $130 can make or break even THAT budget.

To be honest X58 is useless for anything other than the most hardcore professional apps, any thing else, encoding, gaming, ect. are just not going to see any benefit. And for many people, $130 is a lot.
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January 11, 2010 7:21:33 PM

warmon6 said:
+1




Yes im fully aware that the 920 can be overclocked to 4+ GHz and the the x58 motherboards can run full dual pci-e 16x bandwidth. Although there other things to considered.

Not everyone will be, know how, or is comfortable overclocking a cpu . So with that being said, if you look at what i have said above, depending on what your doing, a P55 can be better or a x58 can be better.


You are right that X58 is the first one to implement turbo boost although the x58 cpu turbo boost is not as aggressive as the p55 cpus as i stated earlier.

Core i5 750: 3.2 GHz in dual and single core mode.

Core i7 920: 2.8 GHz single core mode.


For pci-e, as AMW1011 said, Even the most powerful graphic cards of today are hardly affected between PCI-e x8 and x16. there even some benchmarks showing there little difference between x8 and x4 with 5870

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/HD_5870_PCI-Expr...

Were probably going to need to wait for a generation or 2 of GPUs to come though before we fully use PCI-e x16 2.0 bandwidth. Although by the time that happens, we maybe using PCI-e 3.0.

All in truth. If your just gaming, your better off saving money by getting a phenom II x2/3 or soon to be core i3 than core i7 as majority of todays games run only run on 2 threads. That save money can be used for a better gpu.



Yes but I was referring to the target audience and the avid pc builder that will want to spend and build the system to "build" that can last longer in terms of tech and upgradability and using top end parts for a reasonable price. Not interm parts like the psuedo core i5 and 1156 i7's. Believe me when I say there are gamers and PC builders/fans that just want the best and will build the best regardless of budget or if they are the type to upgrade once in a while.... most of them (this number of ppl) will choose the X58 immediatly. I am trying to convince those who are thinking of a P55 in order to save and cf or sli their gpus and get a P55, not to.
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March 1, 2010 8:02:55 PM

Whatever the decision p55 or x58, one should go with a reliable and well reputed vendor.
I made the mistake of deciding to shave some money off my new build by going with an unknown (to me) Motherboard Company. I read the reviews and decided to go with the ASRock x58 extreme mobo, based on recommendations of Tom's Hardware stating that it was a best buy for x58 motherboards.
I assumed incorrectly that the complaints on Newegg.com were from inexperienced users who didn't know anything.
I tried my hardest to OC my i7 920 on this mobo and the settings in my bios weren’t even the same as in the reviews on Tom’s Hardware or several overclock review sites. I think ASRock must have changed its bios on this mobo since the reviews came out.
I was appalled at the insulting way the tech support person for ASRock treated me when I lodged my complaint.
I am not even bothering to RMA this piece of sludge mobo because of the fact that every customer review that I read where someone returned the mobo they got another bad mobo with the same bad feature or same broken part. This implies horrendous customer service and horrendous quality control.
I would rather waste my 170 that I spent and save money for an ASUS or Gigabyte or even an MSI than to ever get another ASRock. The frustrating thing is that ASUS is part owner of ASRock and this tarnishes their fairly decent record.

I should have known not to buy a cut rate mother board when I spend $280 on a CPU.
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March 6, 2010 1:58:10 AM

osiguy said:
Whatever the decision p55 or x58, one should go with a reliable and well reputed vendor.
I made the mistake of deciding to shave some money off my new build by going with an unknown (to me) Motherboard Company. I read the reviews and decided to go with the ASRock x58 extreme mobo, based on recommendations of Tom's Hardware stating that it was a best buy for x58 motherboards.
I assumed incorrectly that the complaints on Newegg.com were from inexperienced users who didn't know anything.
I tried my hardest to OC my i7 920 on this mobo and the settings in my bios weren’t even the same as in the reviews on Tom’s Hardware or several overclock review sites. I think ASRock must have changed its bios on this mobo since the reviews came out.
I was appalled at the insulting way the tech support person for ASRock treated me when I lodged my complaint.
I am not even bothering to RMA this piece of sludge mobo because of the fact that every customer review that I read where someone returned the mobo they got another bad mobo with the same bad feature or same broken part. This implies horrendous customer service and horrendous quality control.
I would rather waste my 170 that I spent and save money for an ASUS or Gigabyte or even an MSI than to ever get another ASRock. The frustrating thing is that ASUS is part owner of ASRock and this tarnishes their fairly decent record.

I should have known not to buy a cut rate mother board when I spend $280 on a CPU.

I hear you, ASrock isnt really a dependable motherboard when comparing it to MSI, gigabyte or even Intel boards (which are standard as far as features go but of good quality).

An X58 is still superior to a P55 in many ways than being inferior, hence the small price it commands over the p and h55's. I think the x58's are now being revised and newer chips are being released this year for that platform and we will start to see more usb 3.0chips.

I wonder if fusion is available for the X58...
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March 12, 2010 3:28:48 AM

Well i'm doing it. What I should have done in the first place.
I'm rma'ing my asrock garbage aka x58 extreme (extreme pos) and my ocz gold memory and i'm taking my money that i'm getting back from new egg and going to my local geek store enu (physical store and europa~enu.com)
I will be paying about 200 more but i'll be getting a p6td deluxe mobo and 6gb of kingston HyperX XMP ram which have been tested by Asus to work on that mobo.

Even though I'll be spending more and having to wait longer to get some more toys, I won't have to wait 2 weeks for rma's, (newegg is pretty good on rma's but i hate having to wait two weeks for anything let alone something i just spent 1300 bucks for.

I just take whatever isn't working back to ENU and they personally warranty any purchase for a year so for any mobo that might work fine for about 6 months and they fail to post like i've read on newegg and tiger direct I can just take it back, throw it at them and demand one that works. They will even take it out of the box and test it for me first if I ask them too.

I don't know, this was the first time i've ever ordered parts for a pc online. 1 bad mobo and two packs of bad ddr 3 tri cor ram....
I'm thinking mobo's and ram aren't the things to send via ups or fedex. Especially when newegg sends them in a manilla envelope with very thin layer of bubble wrap inside. :bounce: 
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March 16, 2010 2:19:13 AM

osiguy said:
Well i'm doing it. What I should have done in the first place.
I'm rma'ing my asrock garbage aka x58 extreme (extreme pos) and my ocz gold memory and i'm taking my money that i'm getting back from new egg and going to my local geek store enu (physical store and europa~enu.com)
I will be paying about 200 more but i'll be getting a p6td deluxe mobo and 6gb of kingston HyperX XMP ram which have been tested by Asus to work on that mobo.

Even though I'll be spending more and having to wait longer to get some more toys, I won't have to wait 2 weeks for rma's, (newegg is pretty good on rma's but i hate having to wait two weeks for anything let alone something i just spent 1300 bucks for.

I just take whatever isn't working back to ENU and they personally warranty any purchase for a year so for any mobo that might work fine for about 6 months and they fail to post like i've read on newegg and tiger direct I can just take it back, throw it at them and demand one that works. They will even take it out of the box and test it for me first if I ask them too.

I don't know, this was the first time i've ever ordered parts for a pc online. 1 bad mobo and two packs of bad ddr 3 tri cor ram....
I'm thinking mobo's and ram aren't the things to send via ups or fedex. Especially when newegg sends them in a manilla envelope with very thin layer of bubble wrap inside. :bounce: 

Its always better to get the best parts available in your nearest store, or at least an outlet that you can return to and repair or exchange the part. Physical availability is always a comfort even at a slight expense over buying through an online retailer. You can preview and at times test the product as well immediately. I have to admit, returning and testing a motherboard will take a while but I had my previous PC assembled by the store where I purchased my items, that PC had no problems and the warrenty stood as well. Now that Pc is with my cousin and is still going strong. Imagine having to return a whole PC if you werent exactly sure what was wrong with it?
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