I5 2500k OCing

I am currently having problems manually overclocking my new processor. I have been messing around with the ASUS Suite II auto tuning and was able to get a stable overclock of 5.0 Ghz but i do not want to have my processor working so hard. I also would like to learn how to properly get a good overclock that will not ruin my $260 processor. So i would like to know what would a good speed be that will not wreck my processor fast and that i will see a good speed increase for gaming? Also how would i go about getting a stable over clock at that speed?
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More about 2500k ocing
  1. 1.most i series if not all are unlocked, go into the overclock menu and raise the cpu multiplier...
    2.the stock speed should be fine for gaming lol...
    on that note, just watch the temps your getting, after overclocking use this program
    http://files.extremeoverclocking.com/file.php?f=205
    run it for ~1hr and watch that the temps in the cores dont go above 70C
    and consider upgrading you cpu cooler if you havent already
  2. i have the h100 for cooling at 5.0 i ran prime95 for half hour and the highest temp i got was 78 degrees, im just looking for a stable speed. i would like to have some form of overclock seeing as that i bought the processor, board and cooler for overclocking.
  3. ^^ eek, try to get the voltages lower, under 70C

    i looked and the Tcase is...
    TCASE

    72.6°C

    the Tcase is like a max optimal temp
    and if it ran for 1/2 an hr its stable :P
  4. nna2 said:
    1.most i series if not all are unlocked,

    Only the K models are unlocked. The rest of the second generation i3/5/7's have a unified clock which makes it very difficult to achieve a significant overclock.
  5. Here is a little something concerning Tcase vs TjMax (I really wish Intel would have thought of a different term, I am sick of "TJMaxx" jokes).

    http://www.overclock.net/t/908770/tcase-is-that-how-hot-the-box-can-get-sb-specs-are-up-on-ark

    So, it seems the Tcase is the temperature reading taken at the top of the CPU's heat spreader, and the TjMax is the maximum core temperature before self-shutdown results. I would pay more attention to the TjMax as read off of CoreTemp, for example. For the 2500K, that is 98deg C. The last post in the link I provided is fairly consistent with other info I have read; that is, as long as you keep the core temperatures around 15-20 deg C lower than the TjMax, you shouldn't shorten the lifespan of your processor by any significant margin, no matter what alarmist types would have you believe. So, for the 2500K, if, at 100% load (Prime95) you are not exceeding 78-80-ish, then all should be good. Note that in actual use, you may never have sustained 100% load on all cores like in a simulated stress test, so your peak temps should be lower anyway, in the 40-50deg C range. I wouldn't worry too much about Tcase, I would think that the CPU would begin self-throttling as the max core temp approaches 90-98C, before the Tcase exceeds 72.6; unless, you somehow royally screw up the seating of the heat sink on the CPU.
  6. jsc said:
    Only the K models are unlocked. The rest of the second generation i3/5/7's have a unified clock which makes it very difficult to achieve a significant overclock.

    sorry lol, i was under the impression that they all were
  7. ^^Tcase is the maximum "optimum" temp, Tjunction is the temp where the processor throttles down(usually above 100C) and Max Tjunction is where the processor gets so hot it will failsafe and shut off
  8. The definitive Asus OC Guide is here:

    http://www.hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1578110
  9. nna2 said:
    ^^Tcase is the maximum "optimum" temp, Tjunction is the temp where the processor throttles down(usually above 100C) and Max Tjunction is where the processor gets so hot it will failsafe and shut off



    Right, but they are read from different parts of the CPU. TjMax is the max core temperature that, if reached, shuts the CPU down. I have not tested this theory myself, but I believe the CPU throttles itself before this temp is reached. Also, TjMax is supposedly not the ultimate max temperature that the processor can sustain before transistors start popping or whatever, but a safe enough temperature that Intel set for self-shutdown. Engineers usually build safety margins into technology, because they know some individuals will want to press right up against the limit, hence, setting the core temperature for throttling and shutdown at less than the temp that the whole thing is liable to melt. Now, I don't think Intel makes any statements one way or another about how close you can run to the TjMax and the degree to potential shorter processor life, unless your thinking that the Tcase defines the "optimum" temp, the optimum being that which can be sustained long-term with no extraordinary wear and tear. The Tcase, from what I gather, is read from the top of the heat spreader in the center of the chip. I would think that, unless you have a defective processor, the Tcase is always going to be some amount less than the core temperature, and at the point that the core temperature is getting close to the throttling zone, the Tcase is hovering below or at its maximum.

    But, there is only one way to tell for sure - if there is a program that can measure Tcase, have it and other utilities that monitor everything open at once (core voltage, core temperature, case temps), and run some stress test. Now, see if the Tcase rises along with the core temp, or if it lags somewhat. If the max Tcase is reached well before the core temp gets into TjMax territory, well, then I guess it is a better idea to pay attention to the Tcase. If, on the other hand, core temp gets close to the start of throttling (mid-high 80's), and the Tcase is reading somewhat below its max, then you can probably just pay attention to the core temp reading, try to keep that in the mid 70's or lower when running 100% loads for extended periods of time, and not worry.
  10. smittyboi said:
    I am currently having problems manually overclocking my new processor. I have been messing around with the ASUS Suite II auto tuning and was able to get a stable overclock of 5.0 Ghz but i do not want to have my processor working so hard. I also would like to learn how to properly get a good overclock that will not ruin my $260 processor. So i would like to know what would a good speed be that will not wreck my processor fast and that i will see a good speed increase for gaming? Also how would i go about getting a stable over clock at that speed?
  11. i have same cpu just set everything to factory and bump it up to 4.4 with some load line calibration on you should be right
  12. Sorry i didnt get to reading this, but you guys say that 70 to 80 degrees is fine at full load but is there a voltage that could cause a major amount of wear and tear to my processor. Also is getting a BSOD from overclocking eventually gonna ruin anything in my computer?
  13. 78C isnt the end of the world, but it will shorten your cpu life if your pushing it alot
  14. I dont think i will be at load often... anyways only 2 of the cores were that high the othewr 2 were 69 and 72
  15. Prime presents an unrealistic load so it is ok to hit 80C but normal operation would never get that hot. I just say tcase as the max normal operation temp but it's debatable. Hitting 80C is not going to be noticeable on lifespan anyways since cpus will last years after you need an upgrade. Safe voltage for long term use is estimated 1.4, tom's uses 1.35. With these voltages, pretty much any decent hsf will keep it in safe temps anyways.
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