Ideal liquid coolant for a custom closed loop system

Hi everyone,

I was wondering if anyone could suggest a liquid for a closed loop system, cost is definitely a factor.

I have been working on a liquid cooling system for my brother (who has no real knowledge) and has no interest in ever having to perform any maintenance. Hence the reason I need to create a loop which would never require flushing or even opening up for that matter.

Ideally reasonably priced, good heat transfer rate and mainly none conductive.

Any advice would be highly appreciated.
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More about ideal liquid coolant custom closed loop system
  1. Are you talking a closed loop cooler like a Corsair/Asetek/CoolIt, etc? Or do you mean an actual watercooling loop? If you don't want any maintenance at all, an actual closed loop cooler might be your best bet. It sounds like you both are working on your first watercooling solution, so getting a better understanding of what you want is a very important first step.

    Have you read through the watercooling sticky? I have it linked in my signature below.

    What is your budget?

    What do you plan to cool- CPU only? GPU(s)? What make/models are each? (depending on what is being cooled).
  2. I mean an actual water cooling loop, intended to cool the CPU, RAM, NB, SB and GPU's. blocks have been custom made using solid blocks of copper no other alloys added. in fact a TEC is used to cool the water with a corsair h50 cooling the tec.

    Most of the work is done and tests have been done using distilled water, very happy but would like to eliminate the need to ever have to open this loop, hence the reason I am looking for a liquid which would avoid growth in the tubing.

    I realise that things got slightly out of hand and i could have saved myself a fortune by using a market cooler but whats done is done, after blowing my budget on the custom blocks I'm rather limited, I really don't want to spend anymore than £60 on the coolant.
  3. Nothing comes even close to good ol' H20, glycerine is the next best thing and I wouldn't advise you filling a loop with syrup lol
    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/thermal-conductivity-liquids-d_1260.html
    Moto
  4. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorinert

    Its expensive but it won't eat your blocks and the linings over an extended period of time.
  5. Motopsychojdn said:
    Nothing comes even close to good ol' H20, glycerine is the next best thing and I wouldn't advise you filling a loop with syrup lol
    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/thermal-conductivity-liquids-d_1260.html
    Moto


    Sadly, I've used that website for my thermo homework... :(

    But yes, distilled H2O is the way to go. Add a little bit of either PT Nuke or a silver killcoil to prevent living things growing (not likely, but it doesn't hurt to be safe, eh?)
  6. nforce4max said:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorinert

    Its expensive but it won't eat your blocks and the linings over an extended period of time.


    Lol Jesus, that would do the job but at £150 per kilo it's slightly over my already well and truly blown budget.
  7. I saw £60 on the budget and discounted it as well hehe,(at least for your build)
    in addition to boilers already sound advice though, a U.V. light in there will also help kill the crawlies as a longterm non-maintenence option
    Moto
  8. I use this: http://www.prestone.com/products/antifreeze_coolant/product_list#product-410

    50/50 mix of ethylene-glycol and water, flows very nice, lubricates your pump, prevents bacteria/algae and has an awesome glow if you put a UV lamp in your case
  9. Water is still best. If you need to run glycol it's likely because you are running a mixed metals loop or will be subjecting part of the components to below-freezing temps. Outside of that, there really isn't a reason to use antifreeze mixtures. And on top of that 50/50 is too much, you really would only want 25/75 glycol/water mixture at most.
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