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Computer tech specs why are recommendations music software requirements said not

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December 18, 2009 12:24:56 PM

If the software system requirements for PC/Mac are met or exceeded, why does everyone say your system is not powerful enough: you need more of this and that -- I tell them my wallet isn't powerful enough. I understand sales personnel motives. If this is true why doesn't the software recommend larger CPU and RAM?
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December 18, 2009 12:51:56 PM

The software makers normally set minimum requirements according to what their app 'needs', rather than what is optimal. Further, these recommendations are put together with the expectation the application in question is the only thing running.

You may get away with the first. But reality being what it is, few users nowadays only have one application open - Even if the others are simply eMail and browser - And even then, how many of us (know/are) the kind of people who have dozens of windows open at a given time because they never actually close anything?

People recommend buying more computer than you need for these reasons, and also because a better computer now will last longer.
December 25, 2009 10:20:47 AM

Thanks to Scotteq for replying. There is so much information on the Net, on just about every topic under the sun, and so much of this is information is conflicting or contradictory, it's difficult to know what applies and what does not.
Scotteq wrote that "The software makers normally set minimum requirements according to what their app 'needs', rather than what is optimal." I have information regarding this, from multiple sources, that says the MINIMUM specs for sequencer software only guarantees that you'll be able to record one or two tracks. ONE OR TWO TRACKS. It seems like everyone else finds this acceptable while I find it to be an even bigger outrage than companies selling software that really should be still in beta. When you're a new, first time buyer, it's funny how no one mentions this. Or at least that's been my experience. When I read claims by software makers that by meeting their RECOMMENDED tech specs I would have, among other things, an unlimited number of tracks to work with, I (shame on me) naively believed them. This wasn't implied nor did I wrongly infer this -- it's clearly a claim right there in their advertisements for all the world to see.
Is there anyone among you six-billion-plus souls out there who agrees?

Thanks -- I needed that rant.
utripp
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