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NEED HELP FAST - CPU Power Connector

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October 2, 2009 1:38:02 PM

UPDATE: HA! Everyone was right! Both of the 4-pin connectors did fit into the CPU Power Connector. You want to know what the problem was? That tall, silver EVGA heatsink next to the CPU was obstructing the way. There was a little piece of plastic on one side of the 4-pin connectors that was hitting it, making it near impossible to push in. Resolution? Used some scissors, snipped the piece of plastic off and it fit in like a glove. My computer is now running nice and smooth! In the process of installing all updates for Vista now. To all the posters here and EVGA's forums: Thank you for all your help.



This past Tuesday, my parts came in and started to build my new computer:

Intel Core i7 920 Nehalem 2.66GHz w/ D0 stepping Processor
Arctic Silver Ceramique Thermal Compound
EVGA X58 3-Way SLI Motherboard (E758-A1)
(2) OCZ Gold 6GB (3 x 2GB) DDR3 1600 Low Voltage (OCZ3G1600LV6GK) Memory
Cooler Master HAF 922 Computer Case
CORSAIR CMPSU-850HX 850W Power Supply
Thermalright TRUE Black 120 Rev.C CPU Cooler w/ (2) Scythe 120mm "Slipstream" Case Fans
XFX Radeon HD 4890 1GB Video Card (HD-489A-ZDEC)
LG Black 8X BD-ROM SATA Internal Blu-ray Reader & DVD±R Burner
Western Digital Caviar Black 500GB 7200 RPM 3.5" Internal Hard Drive
Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 7200 RPM 3.5" Internal Hard Drive
Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium SP1 64-bit

When it came time to plug in the cable for the CPU Power Connector, for some reason it would not fit in (I did not try forcing it in BTW). I took a look at the Corsair box and read that it supports ATX12V and EPS12V, but the connectors on the cable look different. Here's a picture of the connection on the motherboard:




And here's what the cable connections on the Corsair CMPSU-850HX Power Supply look like:




I've also seen many computer rigs from people with the same motherboard and power supply. How were they able to fit the cable into the connector?

In the picture above, the cable has 2 square pins and the other 6 have two shaved corners. On the motherboard, there's 4 square pins and 4 with two shaved corners. If the power supply does support EPS12V, why are the connections on the cable different than what's shown on the motherboard? I don't know ... does that make any sense at all?

Also, all the cables on the power supply that are PCI-E have "PCI-E" written on them. This one does not have any writing at all.

PLEASE HELP ME!
October 2, 2009 2:39:17 PM

Are you flippin' serious?!?! No one here is willing to help me out?!?!
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a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 2, 2009 3:10:19 PM

OK, I looked at your post and did not respond because I am not absolutely sure - I have not had to deal with this "problem". But let's give it a shot.

The plug on the end of the wires has a square pin protector sleeve on the END of the row with black wires, and a square one on one of the middle pins of the yellow-wire line. Well, the socket has a square hole on the end only in the line closest to the silver metal heatsink labeled "EVGA", so that appears to be the only way to plug in. However, four things bother me about this. One is you say it does not seem to fit - that's usually a good place to stop and think, as you have done. Secondly, you have labeled the four socket positions closer to the heatsink as "12v", and plugging in the way I just said would put the BLACK wires into the "12v" socket holes, and the yellow leads into the holes you have labeled "Ground". That is backwards from the usual wiring color code. Thirdly, the plug appears to have extra plastic "wings" around the lower right end (as pictured) to prevent plugging it in the wrong way, and I cannot tell whether the socket will restrict this to only one orientation. Lastly, the plug has an extra bump of plastic on top (The side with 4 black wires), and I'm not clear how this relates to the socket. The socket appears to have a structure that would only allow this bump to slide into a slot on the side you have labeled "Ground". But if that is true, then the square plastic sleeves around the pins on the plug are exactly WRONG for this orientation. On the other hand, the Corsair website's pictures indicate that on the OTHER side of the plug (the one with 4 yellow wires and square pin sleeves in the middle) there is also a plastic connector lock piece that must match up to the mobo socket. So maybe I'm seeing this wrong and it actually wants to plug in the same way the pin protector squares indicate.

Bottom line to me seems to be that this plug should NOT fit into this mobo socket, and that usually means you have incompatible components designed not to fit together and do harm. You would need a different PSU. Look closely at the specs from EVGA about what PSU is needed for the mobo you have. I gotta admit, from the EVGA and Corsair websites the specs indicate these two units should work together.
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October 2, 2009 4:08:42 PM

I've posted this in a few other places (at EVGA's forums and at Anandtech). According to someone from the EVGA forum, they said it should fit no problem. Being that both the motherboard and power supply are brand new, it will be a tight fit to begin with.

Also, last night, I was able to pull it apart into 2 4-pin connectors. Does this matter?
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a b B Homebuilt system
October 2, 2009 4:22:52 PM

being able to pull it apart into 2 4 pin connectors are to maintain compatibility with the older P4 boards that only had a 4 pin 12v connector. The sockets are keyed differently so nobody will plug the wrong 4 pin connector into one of those older style boards. As for why your PSU and board don't seem to fit is a bit of a mystery. I just rebuilt my desktop with a Corsair 650TX and an EVGA P55 LE motherboard. No problems at all with my build.
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October 2, 2009 4:50:25 PM

Even though there are pins that have the two shaved corners, will it still fit into a square connection?
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a b B Homebuilt system
October 2, 2009 4:56:11 PM

It might, but if I was in your place, I wouldn't attempt it unless tech support at either Corsair or EVGA tells you to do so while on the line with them. Right now I'm more inclined to think EVGA might be the better tech support to go after right now since that socket seems to be the one that is not conforming to standard on that particular board.
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a b B Homebuilt system
October 2, 2009 5:22:31 PM

If you look almost at the bottom of the page, the author says " The two cables look very similar so it's easy to get the two confused. 8 Pin PCI Express power cables are usually labeled to distinguish them from 8 pin 12 volt cables. The PCI Express cable usually has "PCI-E" printed on the connector. If there are no labels then you can usually use wire colors to tell the two kinds of cables apart. An 8 pin 12 volt cable has yellow wires on the same side as the connector clip. An 8 Pin PCI Express cable has black wires on the clip side. The two power cables are also keyed differently so you can't plug one kind of power cable into the other kind of connector. But as with this kind of connector, you can sometimes force the wrong kind of cable into a connector if you push hard enough. Make sure you have the right kind of cable before plugging it in. The two are definitely not compatible with each other."

If this is true, the wire you show in your original post looks like it's a PCI-e missing a label. Take a look at the other PCI-e wires you have, do any of them look like it just got labeled wrong?
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a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 2, 2009 6:09:24 PM

Physically you can plug a pin shroud with rounded corners into a square socket hole, but not the other way around. This and the layout of square shrouds says this plug only fits into the socket one way.

I've looked closely at the Corsair PSU's website and manual for this unit, and the pin shroud details on the 8-pin PCIe plug are different (in the layout of square shrouds) from the one for 12v to the CPU. So you could not plug the PCIe plug into the CPU 12v socket by mistake, and OP's photo above says this really IS the 12v plug.

There is a significant difference between OP's photo above of the plug, and what Corsair's website manual shows. In the photo above on both sides of the foremost lower right pin shroud there is plastic extending out from the shroud to the edge of the connector, This would interfere with insertion into a plain hole. But the Corsair manual does NOT show this extra plastic. Maybe OP's connector simply is not molded quite correctly and that extra plastic needs to be trimmed off with a knife.

I guess I am left with only one real reservation right now. If you trim off that bit of plastic it should fit smoothly into the socket. BUT I am still bothered by the fact this will connect four black wires from the PSU to pins that OP has labeled "12v" in the photo, and yellow wires to pins labeled "Ground". As I said, that is not "normal". OP, please check how you decided which socket pins are 12v, and which are Ground. If you have a clear indication in the manual that should answer this. Unfortunately on the EVGA website I could not find a place to download this mobo's manuals to look myself.
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October 2, 2009 6:16:29 PM

Here is what the PCI-E connections look like (they all say "PCI-E" on them):

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a b B Homebuilt system
October 2, 2009 6:16:36 PM

I was wondering about that too, and the OP actually did pull that image straight from the manual. I think they just made a mistake in the graphic. here's the actual .pdf:
http://www.evga.com/support/manuals/files/132-BL-E758.p...

If you look closely at the image, the one on the left doesn't have the clip latch facing "up", yet the zoom in clearly shows it as "up", maybe somebody just put the picture in upside down
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October 2, 2009 6:19:49 PM

Paperdoc said:
Physically you can plug a pin shroud with rounded corners into a square socket hole, but not the other way around. This and the layout of square shrouds says this plug only fits into the socket one way.

I've looked closely at the Corsair PSU's website and manual for this unit, and the pin shroud details on the 8-pin PCIe plug are different (in the layout of square shrouds) from the one for 12v to the CPU. So you could not plug the PCIe plug into the CPU 12v socket by mistake, and OP's photo above says this really IS the 12v plug.

There is a significant difference between OP's photo above of the plug, and what Corsair's website manual shows. In the photo above on both sides of the foremost lower right pin shroud there is plastic extending out from the shroud to the edge of the connector, This would interfere with insertion into a plain hole. But the Corsair manual does NOT show this extra plastic. Maybe OP's connector simply is not molded quite correctly and that extra plastic needs to be trimmed off with a knife.

I guess I am left with only one real reservation right now. If you trim off that bit of plastic it should fit smoothly into the socket. BUT I am still bothered by the fact this will connect four black wires from the PSU to pins that OP has labeled "12v" in the photo, and yellow wires to pins labeled "Ground". As I said, that is not "normal". OP, please check how you decided which socket pins are 12v, and which are Ground. If you have a clear indication in the manual that should answer this. Unfortunately on the EVGA website I could not find a place to download this mobo's manuals to look myself.


Here is the link for my motherboard's manual: http://www.evga.com/support/manuals/files/132-BL-E758.pdf
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October 2, 2009 6:28:12 PM

So, judging from what both of you are saying, I should be able to connect this cable to the CPU Power Connector no problem? If so, where its located on the motherboard (and because of how big the TRUE Black Cooler is), it's kinda difficult to get it connected because, since I have the HAF 922 and I'm routing all my cables behind the motherboard tray, it seems the cable itself is just a little too short.

And seeing is that I want to get this up and running by tonight, ordering an extension cable is out of the question. Are there any computer places that carry EPS12V extension cables?
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a b B Homebuilt system
October 2, 2009 6:36:12 PM

If you have a Microcenter nearby, that's your best bet at getting one. Fry's might have it if you're near one of those, but they aren't in my area so I don't know how well they stock on small accessories. I wouldn't even bother going to Best Buy unless you enjoy making their tech guys feel stupid. 75% of them probably wouldn't even know what the part you're looking for is.
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a b B Homebuilt system
October 2, 2009 6:38:06 PM

As a temporary solution, can't you just run that one wire in the front of your case? It'll let you complete your build and get going, when the extension comes in you can run it behind the motherboard then.
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October 3, 2009 2:21:03 PM

Updated first post!
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!