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notebook soldered battery dead, need advice

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May 31, 2004 1:36:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I have a generic P233 Intel TX chipset notebook. I got it for free. It has
a 3.2 gig hard drive, and 128 megs RAM. It is working great using WIN98SE
and wireless lan. The onboard CMOS battery is dead and I have to set the
date and other settings every time I boot. I can get to the battery, but it
is soldered to the motherboard. I can pry it up and could possible unsolder
it. I would like to replace it because the resetting the BIOS is a pain.
The main battery barely holds a charge and I would like to replace it. I am
holding off on replacing the main battery until I can replace the CMOS
battery. Any advice on removing and resoldering the battery? I think I
have seen a battery holder with wires connected. I think soldering the
wires would take less time with the soldering iron and would reduce the
chance of damaging the mobo. I have also thought about putting a small
alligator clip on the metal strip leading to the mobo from the battery to
help as a heatsink to keep from damaging the mobo.

TIA
Tom
May 31, 2004 1:57:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Tom" <geoman39@nospamcharter.net> wrote in message
news:10bmgnaip641m51@corp.supernews.com...
> I have a generic P233 Intel TX chipset notebook. I got it for free. It
has
> a 3.2 gig hard drive, and 128 megs RAM. It is working great using WIN98SE
> and wireless lan. The onboard CMOS battery is dead and I have to set the
> date and other settings every time I boot. I can get to the battery, but
it
> is soldered to the motherboard. I can pry it up and could possible
unsolder
> it. I would like to replace it because the resetting the BIOS is a pain.
> The main battery barely holds a charge and I would like to replace it. I
am
> holding off on replacing the main battery until I can replace the CMOS
> battery. Any advice on removing and resoldering the battery? I think I
> have seen a battery holder with wires connected. I think soldering the
> wires would take less time with the soldering iron and would reduce the
> chance of damaging the mobo. I have also thought about putting a small
> alligator clip on the metal strip leading to the mobo from the battery to
> help as a heatsink to keep from damaging the mobo.
>
> TIA
> Tom
>
>

I have been looking for a replacement CR2032 battery holder. I know I have
seen a battery holder with external wires leading from it. That way I can
solder the wires to the mobo and replace the battery as needed. I hope I
gave enough description. I thought I had seen one at Cyberguys.com but
couldn't find one today. Please let me know if you have any sources for
this thing.

Thanks
Tom
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 31, 2004 3:25:05 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Tom wrote:
> I have a generic P233 Intel TX chipset notebook. I got it for free. It has
> a 3.2 gig hard drive, and 128 megs RAM. It is working great using WIN98SE
> and wireless lan. The onboard CMOS battery is dead and I have to set the
> date and other settings every time I boot. I can get to the battery, but it
> is soldered to the motherboard. I can pry it up and could possible unsolder
> it. I would like to replace it because the resetting the BIOS is a pain.
> The main battery barely holds a charge and I would like to replace it. I am
> holding off on replacing the main battery until I can replace the CMOS
> battery. Any advice on removing and resoldering the battery? I think I
> have seen a battery holder with wires connected. I think soldering the
> wires would take less time with the soldering iron and would reduce the
> chance of damaging the mobo. I have also thought about putting a small
> alligator clip on the metal strip leading to the mobo from the battery to
> help as a heatsink to keep from damaging the mobo.
>
> TIA
> Tom
>
>
Silvered conductive epoxy works well in laptops for just these kinds
of repairs where soldering is difficult. Ask around at computer repair
shops and hardware stores, they can direct you to a source.

Q
Related resources
May 31, 2004 4:27:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Tom wrote:
> "Tom" <geoman39@nospamcharter.net> wrote in message
> news:10bmgnaip641m51@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>I have a generic P233 Intel TX chipset notebook. I got it for free. It
>
> has
>
>>a 3.2 gig hard drive, and 128 megs RAM. It is working great using WIN98SE
>>and wireless lan. The onboard CMOS battery is dead and I have to set the
>>date and other settings every time I boot. I can get to the battery, but
>
> it
>
>>is soldered to the motherboard. I can pry it up and could possible
>
> unsolder
>
>>it. I would like to replace it because the resetting the BIOS is a pain.
>>The main battery barely holds a charge and I would like to replace it. I
>
> am
>
>>holding off on replacing the main battery until I can replace the CMOS
>>battery. Any advice on removing and resoldering the battery? I think I
>>have seen a battery holder with wires connected. I think soldering the
>>wires would take less time with the soldering iron and would reduce the
>>chance of damaging the mobo. I have also thought about putting a small
>>alligator clip on the metal strip leading to the mobo from the battery to
>>help as a heatsink to keep from damaging the mobo.
>>
>>TIA
>>Tom
>>
>>
>
>
> I have been looking for a replacement CR2032 battery holder. I know I have
> seen a battery holder with external wires leading from it. That way I can
> solder the wires to the mobo and replace the battery as needed. I hope I
> gave enough description. I thought I had seen one at Cyberguys.com but
> couldn't find one today. Please let me know if you have any sources for
> this thing.
>
> Thanks
> Tom
>
>

Should be able to buy the battery with the solder tabs at any electronic
supply store. Digikey will sell you one. Probably cheaper than buying
the conductive epoxy. In a pinch, I've soldered wire to zinc tabs,
laid them on each side of the battery and put heat-shrink around the
assembly to hold it together. Not a relilable solution, but for a free
computer, it works ok ;-)

mike

--
Return address is VALID.
Bunch of stuff For Sale and Wanted at the link below.
Toshiba & Compaq LiIon Batteries, Test Equipment
Yaesu FTV901R Transverter, 30pS pulser
Tektronix Concept Books, spot welding head...
http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Monitor/4710/
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 31, 2004 8:40:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I'd unsolder it. You might cut off the battery and then unsolder the
pins. You need to determine if it's a rechargeable battery or just a
single-use lithium. If you can get a socket, I'd do that, but be sure
that there's room for it (vertically as well as horizontally.

Two cautions here if either the original or replacement battery is
lithium-based:

1. If you try to solder directly to a lithium battery, it will probably
explode.
2. Similarly, if you try to charge a non-rechargeable lithium battery,
it may explode.

The explosion of a lithium battery can be extremely hazardous, or even
fatal.


Tom wrote:
> I have a generic P233 Intel TX chipset notebook. I got it for free. It has
> a 3.2 gig hard drive, and 128 megs RAM. It is working great using WIN98SE
> and wireless lan. The onboard CMOS battery is dead and I have to set the
> date and other settings every time I boot. I can get to the battery, but it
> is soldered to the motherboard. I can pry it up and could possible unsolder
> it. I would like to replace it because the resetting the BIOS is a pain.
> The main battery barely holds a charge and I would like to replace it. I am
> holding off on replacing the main battery until I can replace the CMOS
> battery. Any advice on removing and resoldering the battery? I think I
> have seen a battery holder with wires connected. I think soldering the
> wires would take less time with the soldering iron and would reduce the
> chance of damaging the mobo. I have also thought about putting a small
> alligator clip on the metal strip leading to the mobo from the battery to
> help as a heatsink to keep from damaging the mobo.
>
> TIA
> Tom
>
>
May 31, 2004 8:40:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hi,
The battery in the notebook is a standard CR2032 that has some metal strips
soldered to it. So I can remove the battery with some side cutters and
should be able to either solder a new battery with some already soldered
metal strips, or use the conductive epoxy as stated in the next post.

Thanks


"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:40BB61DD.506@neo.rr.com...
> I'd unsolder it. You might cut off the battery and then unsolder the
> pins. You need to determine if it's a rechargeable battery or just a
> single-use lithium. If you can get a socket, I'd do that, but be sure
> that there's room for it (vertically as well as horizontally.
>
> Two cautions here if either the original or replacement battery is
> lithium-based:
>
> 1. If you try to solder directly to a lithium battery, it will probably
> explode.
> 2. Similarly, if you try to charge a non-rechargeable lithium battery,
> it may explode.
>
> The explosion of a lithium battery can be extremely hazardous, or even
> fatal.
>
>
> Tom wrote:
> > I have a generic P233 Intel TX chipset notebook. I got it for free. It
has
> > a 3.2 gig hard drive, and 128 megs RAM. It is working great using
WIN98SE
> > and wireless lan. The onboard CMOS battery is dead and I have to set
the
> > date and other settings every time I boot. I can get to the battery,
but it
> > is soldered to the motherboard. I can pry it up and could possible
unsolder
> > it. I would like to replace it because the resetting the BIOS is a
pain.
> > The main battery barely holds a charge and I would like to replace it.
I am
> > holding off on replacing the main battery until I can replace the CMOS
> > battery. Any advice on removing and resoldering the battery? I think I
> > have seen a battery holder with wires connected. I think soldering the
> > wires would take less time with the soldering iron and would reduce the
> > chance of damaging the mobo. I have also thought about putting a small
> > alligator clip on the metal strip leading to the mobo from the battery
to
> > help as a heatsink to keep from damaging the mobo.
> >
> > TIA
> > Tom
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 1, 2004 12:31:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I would not use conductive epoxy. Think about it, what will you do when
the NEW battery fails?

Do not try to solder directly to the battery. The explosion risk is real.

I'd try to find a socket, or, if you can't find one that will fit, a
replacement battery with the metal strips (these are welded at the factory).


Tom wrote:

> Hi,
> The battery in the notebook is a standard CR2032 that has some metal strips
> soldered to it. So I can remove the battery with some side cutters and
> should be able to either solder a new battery with some already soldered
> metal strips, or use the conductive epoxy as stated in the next post.
>
> Thanks
>
>
> "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:40BB61DD.506@neo.rr.com...
>
>>I'd unsolder it. You might cut off the battery and then unsolder the
>>pins. You need to determine if it's a rechargeable battery or just a
>>single-use lithium. If you can get a socket, I'd do that, but be sure
>>that there's room for it (vertically as well as horizontally.
>>
>>Two cautions here if either the original or replacement battery is
>>lithium-based:
>>
>>1. If you try to solder directly to a lithium battery, it will probably
>>explode.
>>2. Similarly, if you try to charge a non-rechargeable lithium battery,
>>it may explode.
>>
>>The explosion of a lithium battery can be extremely hazardous, or even
>>fatal.
>>
>>
>>Tom wrote:
>>
>>>I have a generic P233 Intel TX chipset notebook. I got it for free. It
>
> has
>
>>>a 3.2 gig hard drive, and 128 megs RAM. It is working great using
>
> WIN98SE
>
>>>and wireless lan. The onboard CMOS battery is dead and I have to set
>
> the
>
>>>date and other settings every time I boot. I can get to the battery,
>
> but it
>
>>>is soldered to the motherboard. I can pry it up and could possible
>
> unsolder
>
>>>it. I would like to replace it because the resetting the BIOS is a
>
> pain.
>
>>>The main battery barely holds a charge and I would like to replace it.
>
> I am
>
>>>holding off on replacing the main battery until I can replace the CMOS
>>>battery. Any advice on removing and resoldering the battery? I think I
>>>have seen a battery holder with wires connected. I think soldering the
>>>wires would take less time with the soldering iron and would reduce the
>>>chance of damaging the mobo. I have also thought about putting a small
>>>alligator clip on the metal strip leading to the mobo from the battery
>
> to
>
>>>help as a heatsink to keep from damaging the mobo.
>>>
>>>TIA
>>>Tom
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>
!