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An error moving files to a new HDD

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August 14, 2011 9:01:06 PM

Hi everybody

I've just bought a new 2TB internal hard drive since two days . I've inserted it in a case , and have formatted to Fat32 .

But now I am facing a problem while moving my files from the old Hard Drive to the new one . All the files moved smoothly , except the BlueRay movies and the .iso file of OpenSUSE Linux DVD .

The error message says :
  1. The file is too large for the destination file system


I moved my files to the desktop from my HDD , and then have tried moving them to the new HDD , but there was no use .

I'd never faced this problem when I had moved my files to my old HDD , and even when I moved them from my old HDD to the HDD that I use currently . But I do not know what's the matter with the new HDD ?!

Can anybody help please ??

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August 14, 2011 9:20:34 PM

BProgrammer said:
Hi everybody

I've just bought a new 2TB internal hard drive since two days . I've inserted it in a case , and have formatted to Fat32 .

But now I am facing a problem while moving my files from the old Hard Drive to the new one . All the files moved smoothly , except the BlueRay movies and the .iso file of OpenSUSE Linux DVD .

The error message says :
  1. The file is too large for the destination file system


I moved my files to the desktop from my HDD , and then have tried moving them to the new HDD , but there was no use .

I'd never faced this problem when I had moved my files to my old HDD , and even when I moved them from my old HDD to the HDD that I use currently . But I do not know what's the matter with the new HDD ?!

Can anybody help please ??


What's the size of the files your trying to move? Fat32 has a max file size limit of 4Gb which seems to be what's happening. You may have to split the movies into smaller files or transfer everything back off the new drive and reformat to NTFS or exFat.
a b G Storage
August 14, 2011 9:43:32 PM

FAT32 has a limit of 4 Gig file size so any file larger than that has to be split which accounts for the error message.
How did you manage to format a 2TB drive to FAT32? There is a practical limit to FAT32 of 132GB on drives bigger than that the file allocation table becomes too large and can cause unpredictable operation. You must format such a large drive as NTFS which will also solve your file size problem.
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August 14, 2011 11:44:41 PM

Newcomer :
Thanks for you answer .
Actually the smallest file the files that didn't move is the OpenSUSE DVD which is 4.1 GB , the other BlueRay movies are coming around 4.5 GB to 15.5 GB . All the files are bigger than 4 GB .

Veteran : Thanks for you reply .
I formatted the HDD using Herin's Boot CD . And as you said , I was offended when I saw that from 2TB , I am able to use only 1.81 TB :(  .

In fact I want to avoid formatting the HDD as NTFS , because when the file system of the HDD is different than the OS file system , it's more difficult to reach the HDD when the OS is hacked .

So if Fat32 isn't an ideal file system , I think Fat16 is the same or worse . I do not want to use NTFS , ext3 , or ext4 . I need FAT . So if I want to format the HDD to exFAT , that's not possible throw Hiren's Boot CD .

As well as exFAT doesn't work well with Linux !!

Please help guys
a b G Storage
August 15, 2011 12:45:11 AM

Quote:
I formatted the HDD using Herin's Boot CD . And as you said , I was offended when I saw that from 2TB , I am able to use only 1.81 TB :(  .


That is normal my 2TB drive formatted with NTFS gives 1.802TB

Quote:
So if Fat32 isn't an ideal file system , I think Fat16 is the same or worse . I do not want to use NTFS , ext3 , or ext4 . I need FAT . So if I want to format the HDD to exFAT , that's not possible throw Hiren's Boot CD .



EXFAT would be a much better idea than FAT32, given your requirements consider partitioning your drive.

I don’t understand your main objection for not simply formatting the whole drive NTFS and be done with it as there are now lots of programs available to recover data from a NTFS partition.


August 15, 2011 1:05:58 AM

Hey guys

I can move my files to the old HDD , and format the HDD .
But my idea is , when the HDD is NTFS , and the OS partition on the computer's hard drive is also NTFS , it's easy for a hacker to reach the HDD when it he hacks into the computer and HDD is connected . But if file system of the HDD is different , the authentications of the file management become different also , and that makes it much more difficult for a hacker to steal my files if he hacks into my computer .

So if exFAT is an option , and NTFS is another option . Is there anything else available ?
August 15, 2011 1:11:27 AM

By the way , what are the most obvious difference between NTFS and exxFAT , and what is better ?
August 15, 2011 1:19:52 AM

BProgrammer said:
By the way , what are the most obvious difference between NTFS and exxFAT , and what is better ?


exFat has less overhead(more efficient) and larger file size limit.

As for the hacking, if someone gets into your system filesystem differences isn't gonna be much of a problem. If they want your data, they will get it one way or the other.
Further your chances of getting hacked are rather slim.
a b G Storage
August 15, 2011 1:31:17 AM

Don’t rely on the filing system or Windows passwords to protect your data that wouldn’t stop me for more than a few minutes if I wanted to get my hands on your data. To protect your data from people like me use a file encryption program like PGP or even WinZip or WinRar and use a long password of at least 12 characters.
August 15, 2011 3:15:54 AM

di general said:
exFat has less overhead(more efficient) and larger file size limit.

As for the hacking, if someone gets into your system filesystem differences isn't gonna be much of a problem. If they want your data, they will get it one way or the other.
Further your chances of getting hacked are rather slim.


The problem with exFAT is that it's not supported in Ubuntu . And as the links that you posted said that the program is still in beta mode and there's no 100% guarantee that the data won't be lost !!

So the ideal file system for me in the current time is NTFS . But I want to ask , What's the largest file size than I can use on my HDD with NTFS ??

About the difference in the File System , Really ??
I heard in a security tutorial about protecting data , the hacker that made the tutorial said that this way can be good when dealing with a small hacker !

pjmelect :

Oh !!
That too difficult , I cannot just stay with about 470 GB of file and keep archiving them with WinRAR !!!
But thank you anyway , I must try that with my documents and photos , but no need with movies , let all the world watch them :)  .
a b G Storage
August 15, 2011 3:42:42 AM

Quote:
So the ideal file system for me in the current time is NTFS . But I want to ask , What's the largest file size than I can use on my HDD with NTFS ??


Maximum Volume Size NTFS
In theory, the maximum NTFS volume size is 2^64−1 clusters. However, the maximum NTFS volume size as implemented in Windows XP Professional is 2^32−1 clusters. For example, using 64 KB clusters, the maximum Windows XP NTFS volume size is 256 TB minus 64 KB. Using the default cluster size of 4 KB, the maximum NTFS volume size is 16 TB minus 4 KB. (Both of these are vastly higher than the 128 GB limit lifted in Windows XP SP1.) Because partition tables on master boot record (MBR) disks only support partition sizes up to 2 TB, dynamic or GPT volumes must be used to create NTFS volumes over 2 TB. Booting from a GPT volume to a Windows environment requires a system with EFI and 64-bit support.
August 15, 2011 2:38:24 PM

Thanks a lot that was useful !! :D 

Thanks a lot guys , I really appreciate your help :) 
!