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SSD Crash

Hi,

I've just had two issues in the past 2 days. Firstly a Win7 BSOD followed by a boot disk error message. (Asking for a boot disk to be inserted) Fixed that with a format and fresh windows install after unsuccessfully trying to manually rebuild bootmgr. Lost my ME1 & 2 games :fou: Next day I walked away from my PC and came back to a Bootmgr Missing error message. Only thing running at the time was uTorrent. I then had to remove my SSD (SSD wasn't being recognised by win7 installer) and reinstall win7 on my 2TB storage drive.

So anyway, SSD (OCZ Vertex 2 120gb) has been sent off on a warranty claim and I'm left wondering how a 4 month old SSD in a 4 month old build could have died.

Any thoughts? I'm only 1 or 2 evolutionary steps above a luddite and have no clue myself.

Cheers.
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  1. Best answer
    Unfortunately the OCZ SSDs have a pretty bad track record in the reliability area and the situation you experienced is a very classic failure of theirs, sadly way too common. There is really nothing you could have done so don't even worry about that, hopefully OCZ finally fixes their issues.

    The Crucial M4s are the only Sata 3 SSDs I can recommend currently, of course you were using a sata2 and for those the Samsung 470s or Intel 510s seem to have a decent track record, I would avoid the corsair and OCZs for now. Samsung is just coming out with a sata 3 version that is OEM only, hopefully they release another reliable consumer model cause the SSD picture is pretty grim currently lol.
  2. Bad hardware is assembled everyday, quality control is supposed to remedy that.

    Speed Run ME2 (6-hours or so If you know what you are doing) on loyalty Jack before Miranda, Garrus before Grunt
  3. All electronic components suffer from something called "infant mortality". It's just a fact of life in the electronics business. It's the nature of semiconductor products to either fail shortly after initial use or last for ever. To combat this OEMs "burn in" their circuit boards by elevating their temperature while they are powered up. This causes most failures to occur in the burn in ovens. The longer the burn in the less likely to fail from infant mortality. This is probably what happened to your SSD. It is not a function of the design but rather the manufacturing process.
  4. Best answer selected by Jeremy101.
  5. Cheers. I've read similar things elsewhere Mr Yoink.

    c3h8 - What's the outcome?
  6. ram1009 said:
    All electronic components suffer from something called "infant mortality". It's just a fact of life in the electronics business. It's the nature of semiconductor products to either fail shortly after initial use or last for ever. To combat this OEMs "burn in" their circuit boards by elevating their temperature while they are powered up. This causes most failures to occur in the burn in ovens. The longer the burn in the less likely to fail from infant mortality. This is probably what happened to your SSD. It is not a function of the design but rather the manufacturing process.



    Thanks ram. New info for me.

    Hopefully the next one doesn't suffer from SIDS.
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