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2600k Volts? UEFI?

Last response: in Overclocking
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January 22, 2012 2:06:32 PM

Hello there people of the internet ;) 


So the other day I got my 2600k in the post and was really excited, I put it in and this is the second day of me having it and it's quick at stock speeds while rendering videos (what I need to do quick as possible) and I would like to lower render times some more. I'm not looking for a crazy overclock like some people. But I would like 3.9GHz - 4.3GHz and I have two questions,

Firstly what voltage would you recommend for this frequency>

Secondly when I look at CPU voltage on the AsRock Extreme 3 Gen 3 it says 'auto' 'fixed' or 'manual' which one do I need? auto surely would overvolt the CPU and for some reason to already runs hot and I'm using a NH D14. I would be happy with 4.00GHz I don't thing going over that would really benefit me that much.

Thanks for any advice in advance,

- Cain.

More about : 2600k volts uefi

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January 22, 2012 2:31:15 PM



You will need exactly 1.1250V for 4Ghz, I tested your CPU before it arrived at your door. :kaola: 
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a b à CPUs
a c 125 K Overclocking
January 22, 2012 3:07:39 PM

majorgibly said:
Cheers for the help... Good work.


No problem buddy!

Seriously though, (I get fed up with saying this) not every CPU will overclock to the same level. So no one could tell you how much voltage your CPU on your motherboard with your RAM and PSU will need for XXX speed. To find out you'll need to do some testing yourself
January 22, 2012 3:15:52 PM

Rustyy117 said:
No problem buddy!

Seriously though, (I get fed up with saying this) not every CPU will overclock to the same level. So no one could tell you how much voltage your CPU on your motherboard with your RAM and PSU will need for XXX speed. To find out you'll need to do some testing yourself


Don't mean to insult your intelligence but it was a sarcastic comment, much like your originally post. If you read it there was a second question. Maybe you can answer that?
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a c 125 K Overclocking
January 22, 2012 3:50:26 PM

Auto will likely apply to much voltage, more than is necessary for stability, not recommended for overclocking.

Fixed I imagine is just a static voltage you can input, say 1.2V

Manual may be offset voltage (not used an ASROCK mobo before though so not sure) Offset voltage will lower the Vcore when the CPU is idle (enable C states and C1E so your CPU frequency reduces when idle aswell)

Most SB overclocking guides will have info on offset voltage.
January 22, 2012 4:26:14 PM

Rustyy117 said:
Auto will likely apply to much voltage, more than is necessary for stability, not recommended for overclocking.

Fixed I imagine is just a static voltage you can input, say 1.2V

Manual may be offset voltage (not used an ASROCK mobo before though so not sure) Offset voltage will lower the Vcore when the CPU is idle (enable C states and C1E so your CPU frequency reduces when idle aswell)

Most SB overclocking guides will have info on offset voltage.


So in the grand scheme of things offset will allow me to input a value and while dropping when in a idle state correct?
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January 22, 2012 6:23:11 PM

Yup, it'll save some electricity and perhaps increase the life span of your CPU, probably the best option for most, though some people have found that a fixed voltage value is best for extreme overclocks as the dip (from load to idle) can sometimes cause instability at extreme overclocks.
!