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Kingston 16GB filesystem

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August 20, 2011 2:28:54 PM

I have a Kingston G2 16GB pendrive, i want to know which file system and file allocation size is better to my pen drive.

i am currently in NTFS with default file allocation size but the speed is around 5MB/s

please help me
a c 415 G Storage
August 20, 2011 5:13:48 PM

The default allocations size should work fine. Most standard USB flash drives are pretty slow, 5MByte/sec is not uncommon, particularly for writing. Reformatting the drive as FAT may give you a little bit of performance boost, though - more if your copies involve creating a lot of files.
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August 21, 2011 1:41:33 AM

at 16Gb its safer to use NTFS, if you had 4Gb or less FAT32 would be fine, but its less safe. i get 5mb/s out of my 2gb flash drive using usb 2.0 ports and its usb 3.0 compatible, which it's at about 10mb/s, flash drives aren't the fastest transferers
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August 21, 2011 2:15:32 AM

sminlal said:
The default allocations size should work fine. Most standard USB flash drives are pretty slow, 5MByte/sec is not uncommon, particularly for writing. Reformatting the drive as FAT may give you a little bit of performance boost, though - more if your copies involve creating a lot of files.


but in FAT file system, files more than 4GB cannot be added know
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August 21, 2011 2:19:08 AM

SpazldNinjaDude said:
at 16Gb its safer to use NTFS, if you had 4Gb or less FAT32 would be fine, but its less safe. i get 5mb/s out of my 2gb flash drive using usb 2.0 ports and its usb 3.0 compatible, which it's at about 10mb/s, flash drives aren't the fastest transferers


then which company pendrives are faster writing in USB2.0
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a c 415 G Storage
August 21, 2011 3:58:49 PM

SpazldNinjaDude said:
at 16Gb its safer to use NTFS, if you had 4Gb or less FAT32 would be fine, but its less safe.
I'm not quite sure what you mean here by "safe". There's nothing particularly "dangerous" about FAT32 in terms of it's ability to work correctly. The biggest issues with FAT32 are limitations of its design such as the inability to handle files larger than 4GB or additional streams in a file with more than one. But I'd consider those to be functional, not reliability issues.

NTFS does use a journalling file system which gives it a better ability to recover from potential corruption due to interrupted operations (such as yanking the drive in the middle of an operation), but that comes at the cost of extra writes which can hurt its performance on flash drives. And if you take a little care in terms of how you use the drive (never remove the drive without first requesting the system to eject it, for example), then FAT32 is basically as reliable as NTFS.
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