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Help with remote retrieval please

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July 13, 2005 11:36:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

Suddenly, I have to head away for the weekend, and there are 3
premieres on fri that I've been waiting for all summer long.
Now, I don't think I will be available to watch them live, but I
am pretty sure I'll have access to a high speed connection.

Problem is, I'm not exactly sure how to contact my tivo from the
outside.
I've got a cablemodem, wired into a dell truemobile 2300, then
wireless to the tivo. There are a few other devices receiving
service through the 2300 as well. DHCP manually assigns a
specific 192.168 ip to the tivo, so I know which internal ip I
need to ping. Assuming I open all ports between the world and the
tivo, how do I put together the address in the url of a web
browser? Is it something like
https://house-ip/192.168.x.x/nowplaying/index.html or how is it
specifically formatted?

Any help would be great. Thanks.

More about : remote retrieval

July 14, 2005 4:37:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

Need more info....... are you talking about using Tivo Desktop
or is it a hacked TiVo? If it's a DirecTiVo, you'll need to hack
it first. TiVo doesn't have a built in webserver unless you
hack it and install TiVoWeb Plus.

<Jason> wrote in message news:1f7bd19mt05bq8b7u6duuauvjbmv0v4gc9@4ax.com...
> Suddenly, I have to head away for the weekend, and there are 3
> premieres on fri that I've been waiting for all summer long.
> Now, I don't think I will be available to watch them live, but I
> am pretty sure I'll have access to a high speed connection.
>
> Problem is, I'm not exactly sure how to contact my tivo from the
> outside.
> I've got a cablemodem, wired into a dell truemobile 2300, then
> wireless to the tivo. There are a few other devices receiving
> service through the 2300 as well. DHCP manually assigns a
> specific 192.168 ip to the tivo, so I know which internal ip I
> need to ping. Assuming I open all ports between the world and the
> tivo, how do I put together the address in the url of a web
> browser? Is it something like
> https://house-ip/192.168.x.x/nowplaying/index.html or how is it
> specifically formatted?
>
> Any help would be great. Thanks.
Anonymous
July 14, 2005 4:37:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

RobR wrote:
> Need more info....... are you talking about using Tivo Desktop
> or is it a hacked TiVo? If it's a DirecTiVo, you'll need to hack
> it first. TiVo doesn't have a built in webserver unless you
> hack it and install TiVoWeb Plus.
>
> <Jason> wrote in message news:1f7bd19mt05bq8b7u6duuauvjbmv0v4gc9@4ax.com...
>
>>Suddenly, I have to head away for the weekend, and there are 3
>>premieres on fri that I've been waiting for all summer long.
>>Now, I don't think I will be available to watch them live, but I
>>am pretty sure I'll have access to a high speed connection.
>>
>>Problem is, I'm not exactly sure how to contact my tivo from the
>>outside.
>>I've got a cablemodem, wired into a dell truemobile 2300, then
>>wireless to the tivo. There are a few other devices receiving
>>service through the 2300 as well. DHCP manually assigns a
>>specific 192.168 ip to the tivo, so I know which internal ip I
>>need to ping. Assuming I open all ports between the world and the
>>tivo, how do I put together the address in the url of a web
>>browser? Is it something like
>>https://house-ip/192.168.x.x/nowplaying/index.html or how is it
>>specifically formatted?
>>
>>Any help would be great. Thanks.
>

Sounds like a job for a Slingbox! ;-)

http://www.slingmedia.com/

(and some people said it was't useful!)

--
Randy S.
Related resources
July 14, 2005 8:38:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 00:37:44 GMT, RobR wrote:

>Need more info....... are you talking about using Tivo Desktop
>or is it a hacked TiVo? If it's a DirecTiVo, you'll need to hack
>it first. TiVo doesn't have a built in webserver unless you
>hack it and install TiVoWeb Plus.
>

No, I'm talking about standard tivo series 2. 2400-something...
There's an unsupported bare-bones web server in there, only
handles a single page, to my knowledge, but I'm pretty sure
there's more to it. But I only care about one thing right now.
That is, unless the person who I bought it from put tivoweb on
there. Those of you who have experience, you tell me, because I
didn't put it on there.

From inside the truemobile 2300, inside my home network/lan, I
punch in https://192.169.2.4 and I get a username/pass dialog box
from the tivo. User is always 'tivo' (lowercase!) the password is
your media access key (MAK). Once you enter those in, you get a
listing of the programs on the box. Oh, you must accept the
security certificate. It even puts the program listing in groups!
You do NOT need anything installed on the pc. I've not hacked
this box. No Tivo Desktop. No TivoWeb. Straight from the previous
owner.

But the problem is, in the browser's 'address' box, I have to put
https://192.168.2.4 and, that is one of the ip numbers that is
set aside for private networks. Once I'm on the other side of my
home router, on the outside, I need to be able to get the page
request to travel through the router and onward to the tivo, in a
single command.

It's like sending something to a specific office, in an office
building. The people inside just write 'Room 212', and that's
basically, in concept, how it is handled for everyone, though
they do not know it. But the people outside have to write 'Room
212, 13 main street'. I'm in the predicament of not knowing how
to explicitly spell out the '13 main street' so that I can get a
connection to 'Room 212'.
July 14, 2005 9:00:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 04:38:52 -0400, Jason wrote:

>That is, unless the person who I bought it from put tivoweb on
>there. Those of you who have experience, you tell me, because I
>didn't put it on there.

Nope, went and saw a screenshot from an old tivoweb, and it's
more feature-ific than what's on my box.
Anonymous
July 14, 2005 1:25:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

You need to set up the router to forward http requests to your TiVo.
Most routers call this "port forwarding" or something like it. The
simplest way to do this is to forward inbound port 443 to your TiVo's
port 443. (Check your router's manual to figure out how to do this.)
Now a browser request from the outside world of the form

https://your_external_ip_address/

will go to your TiVo. Some ISPs block these ports, though, since they
don't like people to set up web servers. (Again, you'll need to know
your router's external IP address, which might change from time to time
depending on how your ISP has set things up. The web page
http://checkip.dyndns.org/ will tell you what your external IP address
is.) You might be able to get around this by using different inbound
port numbers. For example, you might forward inbound port 1443 to your
TiVo's port 443. Now you'd use

http://your_external_ip_address:1443/

instead of the above. (Note that I used http instead of https.)

Good luck!

In article <e57cd11ef7evl13paqc16iues8gf3slv89@4ax.com>, Jason wrote:

> On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 00:37:44 GMT, RobR wrote:
>
> >Need more info....... are you talking about using Tivo Desktop
> >or is it a hacked TiVo? If it's a DirecTiVo, you'll need to hack
> >it first. TiVo doesn't have a built in webserver unless you
> >hack it and install TiVoWeb Plus.
> >
>
> No, I'm talking about standard tivo series 2. 2400-something...
> There's an unsupported bare-bones web server in there, only
> handles a single page, to my knowledge, but I'm pretty sure
> there's more to it. But I only care about one thing right now.
> That is, unless the person who I bought it from put tivoweb on
> there. Those of you who have experience, you tell me, because I
> didn't put it on there.
>
> From inside the truemobile 2300, inside my home network/lan, I
> punch in https://192.169.2.4 and I get a username/pass dialog box
> from the tivo. User is always 'tivo' (lowercase!) the password is
> your media access key (MAK). Once you enter those in, you get a
> listing of the programs on the box. Oh, you must accept the
> security certificate. It even puts the program listing in groups!
> You do NOT need anything installed on the pc. I've not hacked
> this box. No Tivo Desktop. No TivoWeb. Straight from the previous
> owner.
>
> But the problem is, in the browser's 'address' box, I have to put
> https://192.168.2.4 and, that is one of the ip numbers that is
> set aside for private networks. Once I'm on the other side of my
> home router, on the outside, I need to be able to get the page
> request to travel through the router and onward to the tivo, in a
> single command.
>
> It's like sending something to a specific office, in an office
> building. The people inside just write 'Room 212', and that's
> basically, in concept, how it is handled for everyone, though
> they do not know it. But the people outside have to write 'Room
> 212, 13 main street'. I'm in the predicament of not knowing how
> to explicitly spell out the '13 main street' so that I can get a
> connection to 'Room 212'.
July 14, 2005 6:26:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

I know nothing about the truemobile 2300, but what you need to figure
out how to do is configure port forwarding. Basically if you have a
decent router that supports this (most of them do these days), you
should find a screen that will let you forward a port to a specific
IP address. You'd set up port 443 (https) to forward any
traffic coming in for that port to your TiVo's IP address. To
get to it from the outside you'd need to know your routers
external IP address (look into using something like DynDNS
so if your external IP changes all the time, you can still map
it to a static name like jason.dyndns.org). Then you'd
just access the tivo with https://jason.dyndns.org. Only
caveat I can think of is some routers use port 443 for their
web interface. Forwarding 443 might not be allowed or
it might disable remote access to the router https based
interfaced (which might still be ok as many of them run the
interface on port 80 as well).

<Jason> wrote in message news:e57cd11ef7evl13paqc16iues8gf3slv89@4ax.com...

> From inside the truemobile 2300, inside my home network/lan, I
> punch in https://192.169.2.4 and I get a username/pass dialog box
> from the tivo. User is always 'tivo' (lowercase!) the password is
> your media access key (MAK). Once you enter those in, you get a
> listing of the programs on the box. Oh, you must accept the
> security certificate. It even puts the program listing in groups!
> You do NOT need anything installed on the pc. I've not hacked
> this box. No Tivo Desktop. No TivoWeb. Straight from the previous
> owner.
>
> But the problem is, in the browser's 'address' box, I have to put
> https://192.168.2.4 and, that is one of the ip numbers that is
> set aside for private networks. Once I'm on the other side of my
> home router, on the outside, I need to be able to get the page
> request to travel through the router and onward to the tivo, in a
> single command.
>
> It's like sending something to a specific office, in an office
> building. The people inside just write 'Room 212', and that's
> basically, in concept, how it is handled for everyone, though
> they do not know it. But the people outside have to write 'Room
> 212, 13 main street'. I'm in the predicament of not knowing how
> to explicitly spell out the '13 main street' so that I can get a
> connection to 'Room 212'.
July 14, 2005 6:26:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 14:26:30 GMT, RobR wrote:

>I know nothing about the truemobile 2300, but what you need to figure
>out how to do is configure port forwarding. Basically if you have a
>decent router that supports this (most of them do these days), you
>should find a screen that will let you forward a port to a specific
>IP address. You'd set up port 443 (https) to forward any
>traffic coming in for that port to your TiVo's IP address. To
>get to it from the outside you'd need to know your routers
>external IP address (look into using something like DynDNS
>so if your external IP changes all the time, you can still map
>it to a static name like jason.dyndns.org). Then you'd
>just access the tivo with https://jason.dyndns.org. Only
>caveat I can think of is some routers use port 443 for their
>web interface. Forwarding 443 might not be allowed or
>it might disable remote access to the router https based
>interfaced (which might still be ok as many of them run the
>interface on port 80 as well).
>

Thanks, both of you. There's an option for a 'DMZ Host', to turn
off port blocking for an specific internal ip to run a game
server, and port forwarding as well, did both. If it's still
blocked, then I guess it's at my isp end. And I've had the same
ip for... months I think, so no worries there. Hope it works, no
time to test it.

I'll let you know how it goes.
Anonymous
July 14, 2005 7:23:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

You may want to consult your provider's Terms of Service Acceptable Use
Policy at http://www.rcn.com/customer/pdfs/internet/accceptableus...
which states
"RCN cable modem service is for residential use only and our network will not
support or allow servers of any kind from the home."

Some outfits ignore their own policies. But others will terminate service
if they discover violators. Also, you might consider whether making TiVoed
material available to the global internet is a problem.

--
oK+++
Anonymous
July 16, 2005 9:11:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

Jason wrote:
> Suddenly, I have to head away for the weekend, and there are 3
> premieres on fri that I've been waiting for all summer long.
> Now, I don't think I will be available to watch them live, but I
> am pretty sure I'll have access to a high speed connection.
>
> Problem is, I'm not exactly sure how to contact my tivo from the
> outside.

If you've got a Series 2 TiVo, use TiVo Central Online
https://www3.tivo.com/tivo-com/tco/index.do
and your TiVo will contact that server for instructions.

> I've got a cablemodem, wired into a dell truemobile 2300, then
> wireless to the tivo. There are a few other devices receiving
> service through the 2300 as well. DHCP manually assigns a specific
> 192.168 ip to the tivo, so I know which internal ip I need to ping.
> Assuming I open all ports between the world and the tivo,

No, don't do that! The TiVo OS is not hardened in any way against
attacks from the network. Absolutely do set the firewall's DMZ host
to your TiVo; that removes all protection.

> how do I put together the address in the url of a web browser? Is it something like
> https://house-ip/192.168.x.x/nowplaying/index.html or how is it
> specifically formatted?

Depends on how the proxy is implemented. I've been thinking of writing
something to run as an Apache cgi-bin, but nothing concrete.

Here's how I do it:

The LAN (192.168.1.*) has a router, his & hers laptops, his & hers
Series 1 TiVos, and a linux box. Only the latter is accessible from
the outside world, and only on port 22 (sshd).

At work, I use ssh with port forwarding to access the linux box.
'ssh home-ip -L 3106:192.168.1.6:80 -L 3106:192.168.1.8:80'
I use bookmarks: joe-now-showing = http://localhost:3106/nowshowing
and sally-now-showing = http://localhost:3108/nowshowing.

The advantage of this that all I need in terms of software is just
ssh + sshd. The disadvantage is that I cannot use any old browser
at an Internet cafe to control my TiVo.

-Joe

http://www.inwap.com/tivo/SmithTV2005.gif
July 18, 2005 5:21:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 15:23:41 -0400, Obfus Kataa wrote:

>You may want to consult your provider's Terms of Service Acceptable Use
>Policy at http://www.rcn.com/customer/pdfs/internet/accceptableus...
>which states
>"RCN cable modem service is for residential use only and our network will not
>support or allow servers of any kind from the home."
>

This would be difficult to enforce completely, as it would
require all people to stop using MS Windows.
'Internet Connection Sharing', on Win98 and later Windows boxes,
manages other systems connecting to the internet through a proxy.
In effect, that proxy 'serves' content to a machine that is not
directly attached to the ISP's system. Therefore, that machine is
a server, because it has the capabilities of a server, and 'any
kind of server' would have to go away.

If they were to come after me, I could also argue my fair-use
rights, as guaranteed to me by the betamax case.
July 18, 2005 5:34:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

On Sat, 16 Jul 2005 05:11:50 -0700, Joe Smith wrote:

>Jason wrote:
>> Suddenly, I have to head away for the weekend, and there are 3
>> premieres on fri that I've been waiting for all summer long.
>> Now, I don't think I will be available to watch them live, but I
>> am pretty sure I'll have access to a high speed connection.
>>
>> Problem is, I'm not exactly sure how to contact my tivo from the
>> outside.
>
>If you've got a Series 2 TiVo, use TiVo Central Online
> https://www3.tivo.com/tivo-com/tco/index.do
>and your TiVo will contact that server for instructions.

Erm, what would that have given me? I wasn't looking to schedule
something new, I wanted to pull a show off my tivo to my laptop
so I could watch it while away from home.

>Here's how I do it:
>At work, I use ssh with port forwarding to access the linux box.

No linux box. I'm sorry, but you're situation really doesn't
help. Besides, I was gone 2 days before you posted.

At any rate, the settings I made didn't work. Now I'll play with
them a bit so I'll be ready, should this kind of situation ever
come up again. Thanks everyone.
Anonymous
July 18, 2005 9:31:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

On 2005-07-18, Jason <Jason> wrote:
> On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 15:23:41 -0400, Obfus Kataa wrote:
>
>>You may want to consult your provider's Terms of Service Acceptable Use
>>Policy at http://www.rcn.com/customer/pdfs/internet/accceptableus...
>>which states
>>"RCN cable modem service is for residential use only and our network will not
>>support or allow servers of any kind from the home."
>>
>
> This would be difficult to enforce completely, as it would
> require all people to stop using MS Windows.
> 'Internet Connection Sharing', on Win98 and later Windows boxes,
> manages other systems connecting to the internet through a proxy.
> In effect, that proxy 'serves' content to a machine that is not
> directly attached to the ISP's system. Therefore, that machine is
> a server, because it has the capabilities of a server, and 'any
> kind of server' would have to go away.

What you describe is not a server from the internet's viewpoint, it would
only appear as a server from another machine inside your home. It's not
serving anything to the internet, it is simply another client. What you
describe is more of a router than a server.

> If they were to come after me, I could also argue my fair-use
> rights, as guaranteed to me by the betamax case.

I don't believe the betamax case really applies here, if you read the
judgement and what they actually say. The judgement doesn't provide for a
generic fair-use clause like you want to use.

--
This is my .sig
July 18, 2005 9:31:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

On Mon, 18 Jul 2005 05:31:42 -0000, Mike Hunt wrote:

>On 2005-07-18, Jason <Jason> wrote:
>> On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 15:23:41 -0400, Obfus Kataa wrote:
>>
>>>You may want to consult your provider's Terms of Service Acceptable Use
>>>Policy at http://www.rcn.com/customer/pdfs/internet/accceptableus...
>>>which states
>>>"RCN cable modem service is for residential use only and our network will not
>>>support or allow servers of any kind from the home."
>>>
>>
>> This would be difficult to enforce completely, as it would
>> require all people to stop using MS Windows.
>> 'Internet Connection Sharing', on Win98 and later Windows boxes,
>> manages other systems connecting to the internet through a proxy.
>> In effect, that proxy 'serves' content to a machine that is not
>> directly attached to the ISP's system. Therefore, that machine is
>> a server, because it has the capabilities of a server, and 'any
>> kind of server' would have to go away.
>
>What you describe is not a server from the internet's viewpoint, it would
>only appear as a server from another machine inside your home. It's not
>serving anything to the internet, it is simply another client. What you
>describe is more of a router than a server.

A server is anything that functions as a dispensary for content.

>> If they were to come after me, I could also argue my fair-use
>> rights, as guaranteed to me by the betamax case.
>
>I don't believe the betamax case really applies here, if you read the
>judgement and what they actually say. The judgement doesn't provide for a
>generic fair-use clause like you want to use.

I'm not re-broadcasting anything for public use, only acquiring
my personal recording for my own private use. Even the method
includes my laptop, which qualifies as being a part of my
household. Further, I made no attempt to break tivo's methods of
securing my content, the MAK was still in effect, so I wasn't
putting anything in the public view. And I didn't post my ip, so
I wasn't even giving someone the address to try to break in.
Distance is not the issue that defines fair-use. It is the intent
and the process used to time-shift the viewing of the program.
July 18, 2005 11:27:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

<Jason> wrote in message news:a9hmd1pqltve64cdlg7ou1449bir1cgs6r@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 18 Jul 2005 05:31:42 -0000, Mike Hunt wrote:
>
>>On 2005-07-18, Jason <Jason> wrote:
>>> On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 15:23:41 -0400, Obfus Kataa wrote:
>>>
>>>>You may want to consult your provider's Terms of Service Acceptable Use
>>>>Policy at
>>>>http://www.rcn.com/customer/pdfs/internet/accceptableus...
>>>>which states
>>>>"RCN cable modem service is for residential use only and our network
>>>>will not
>>>>support or allow servers of any kind from the home."
>>>>
>>>
>>> This would be difficult to enforce completely, as it would
>>> require all people to stop using MS Windows.
>>> 'Internet Connection Sharing', on Win98 and later Windows boxes,
>>> manages other systems connecting to the internet through a proxy.
>>> In effect, that proxy 'serves' content to a machine that is not
>>> directly attached to the ISP's system. Therefore, that machine is
>>> a server, because it has the capabilities of a server, and 'any
>>> kind of server' would have to go away.
>>
>>What you describe is not a server from the internet's viewpoint, it would
>>only appear as a server from another machine inside your home. It's not
>>serving anything to the internet, it is simply another client. What you
>>describe is more of a router than a server.
>
> A server is anything that functions as a dispensary for content.

But to his point, you are not "serving" anything on the public Internet,
only internally.
Anonymous
July 18, 2005 12:25:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

>>A server is anything that functions as a dispensary for content.
>
>
> But to his point, you are not "serving" anything on the public Internet,
> only internally.

Right, if you are not "serving" any traffic back out to the public
network, even if it *was* against the AUP (which I don't believe it is),
how would they even know?

However, there are plenty of other arguments that can be made against
the no-server rule. A server can be defined as a computer that runs a
service that sends or receives data from the Internet as a result of
transaction initiated from another source on the Internet. But tons of
programs do that, and if you ban them all it is clearly absurd. All P2P
programs (bittorrent, eMule, etc.) would be banned, including legit
ones. All VOIP (since they can send & receive) systems would be banned,
including Vonage, callvantage, and Skype. You could even claim e-mail
is banned, though that's less clear since most cable companies fairly
clearly outline an accepted way to send mail (through their internal
servers) and unacceptable means (from your own SMTP server).

Basically, when you consider all of that, it's pretty clear that this
particular rule is a "Cover your ass" rule, i.e. not really enforced
except when a particular person or service causes a problem, either
legally or practically. Use of personal SMTP servers became a problem
due to viruses and worms, so it was blocked (for many providers anyway).
If someone becomes an enormous bandwidth hog on a limited network
resource by using a P2P application, they may find themselves kicked off
or limited (this happens way more often with Satellite Internet than
cable). So, in that sense, I suggest you run whatever server you want,
assuming it is otherwise legal.

Randy S.
Anonymous
July 18, 2005 3:06:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

Jason wrote:
> On Sat, 16 Jul 2005 05:11:50 -0700, Joe Smith wrote:
>
>
>>Jason wrote:
>>
>>>Suddenly, I have to head away for the weekend, and there are 3
>>>premieres on fri that I've been waiting for all summer long.
>>>Now, I don't think I will be available to watch them live, but I
>>>am pretty sure I'll have access to a high speed connection.
>>>
>>>Problem is, I'm not exactly sure how to contact my tivo from the
>>>outside.
>>
>>If you've got a Series 2 TiVo, use TiVo Central Online
>> https://www3.tivo.com/tivo-com/tco/index.do
>>and your TiVo will contact that server for instructions.
>
> Erm, what would that have given me? I wasn't looking to schedule
> something new, I wanted to pull a show off my tivo to my laptop
> so I could watch it while away from home.

Sorry, I misread that.

It may be possible to get the TivoToGo beacon remotely by
using a VPN. I've seen D-Link and Linksys firewall-routers ($70)
that can handle incoming VPN connections. A laptop with an
IPSec client (like the one built-in to WinXP) could authenticate
and then see your private IP addresses directly.

-Joe
!