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E5200 Heatsink Question

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December 29, 2009 3:42:49 PM

Hi all,

I just purchased an e5200 dual core:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
along with an ACS motherboard:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I have read that the heatsink/fan that comes with the e5200 is very small, and should be replaced with an aftermarket one. How does the sizing work for this? Do I just need any heatsink/fan combo that works with an LGA 775 socket, or is there more to it than that? I am pretty new at this, so thanks for any advice!

I am probably going to try overclocking eventually (not sure how far I will get with that mobo)
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December 29, 2009 4:02:12 PM

I use the Intel heatsink for mild overclocking. But checkout the cooler master Hyper 212 plus for $28.83 with free shipping at newegg. It should be all you need for overclocking. The 4 pin fan connector allows you to reduce the fan speed in the bios. I would use about 2500 rpm.
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December 29, 2009 4:27:00 PM

As long as you dont go for some oversized monster HSF that clahses with any sockets or heatsinks on the mobo then any Socket 775 one will be fine. I would stick to decent brand name ones - preferably with AS5 or MX" thermal compound - which can be bought seperately for a few dollars.
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December 29, 2009 7:11:27 PM

If you're not going to overclock full-time, the stock Intel HSF will suffice.
If you want to stay cooler, then just add a case fan to the side panel to create more circualtion.
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December 29, 2009 7:27:09 PM

To answer your question, Yes! any HS/F that supports LGA775 will work, that is, provided it will fit in your case.
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December 29, 2009 7:28:51 PM

yeah the stock HSF is rather awful, it keeps my dad's E5200 @stock at 33c on one core and 40c on the other at idle, and thats with 2 120mm fans in a very small case. Aftermarket one would do great.
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December 29, 2009 7:45:40 PM

The E5x00 produce less than 65w TDP heat.
Any aftermarket cooler should be sufficient for a good bit of OCing.

I bought a cheap $10 thermaltake HSF cooler, and it keeps my E5300 OCed to 3.0GHz at 33'C idle, 45'C load @ Prime95.
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January 5, 2010 11:57:11 AM

Thanks for the input guys, I ended up picking up the Zalman monster of a heatsink/fan:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I did this just in case I decide to do some major OC'ing in the future :D  Just did my first ever build last night, works so far! I was a little worried the Zalman was going to brush up against my PSU, but it just barely made the fit. Didn't realize that I only had 1 IDE port also, so I need to pick up an IDE to SATA cable before I can do much else (both of my old CD drives & hard drive are IDE, only one IDE port on motherboard).
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January 5, 2010 8:58:26 PM

I have a e5200 and the heatsink is just fine. You can even overclock to about 3ghz with stock cooler. If go higher then 3ghz then diffidently need another cooler. If not overclocking then you do not need it at all.
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