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Rubix and cheaptrix

Tags:
  • Water Cooling
  • Cooling
  • CPUs
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
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February 3, 2012 1:38:19 AM

Based on your comments I changed my build. You were unhappy with the best answer that stated I did not need more cooling and it was also stated my cpu cooler was positioned poorly. So I did some more cable management and changed the cpu cooler based on your thoughts.

before: http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll16/mephistois/Mobi...
after: http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll16/mephistois/1565...

After a few tests I have found little or no difference in cpu temps and the gpu temps are a bit higher. I appreciate your advice but, I thought this information would beneficial for your own knowledge. I can see why the cooler looks poor that way but, it was intentionally to pull heat off my pci slots as the cooler does a wonderful job and I did not have any temp problems with my cpu. Thank you both for your input as this was a learning experience for me.

More about : rubix cheaptrix

a b à CPUs
a c 337 K Overclocking
February 3, 2012 2:13:31 AM

I wasn't really unhappy about the post you chose as the best answer, I mainly was in disagreement with that being the best answer and incorrect... I still think having it rotated to flow horizontally is the better option. Otherwise, you are essentially blocking 95% of the airflow of that bottom fan which also blocks the complete airflow through the cooler. If you had the middle fan blowing up, and the bottom fan on top as a pull, essentially leaving a gap between the cooler and your top GPU, I would then agree with your vertical cooler/fan positioning...there is an argument to be made there.

I appreciate the 'gotcha' post and if you are happy with your claims, so be it. I still disagree with the original orientation, though. Furthermore, I am willing to bet that if you held a poll in the heatsinks/air cooling section on which users would choose as the best option, we'd be in agreement with the vast majority. It's great that you are happy with the performance, but again, it's your hardware.

One thing you learned today: testing a hardware hypothesis.
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February 3, 2012 2:53:40 AM

I agree with what Rubix said.

Anyway, how long it's been since you last opened your video cards inner housing & clean it?
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February 3, 2012 3:24:19 AM

3 months but I do hit everything with duster once a week
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February 3, 2012 4:47:18 AM

I'm surprised you haven't found any change in temps after changing the orientation of your heatsink.. the original orientation looks like it would be hindering performance. It actually kind of reminds me of this video review (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bjh8zerBbs8) where these cards are put in SLI/crossfire with hardly any gap between them.. I was surprised it worked at all, although I do seem to remember the reviewer complain sometime in the video that the system crashed a few times while he was testing :lol: 

Either way, I haven't really been following this at all.. and I'll just assume the tests were fair + included ambient temp etc.. because I really don't want to spend the time catching up. Glad to hear you're happy though :p 
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February 3, 2012 3:28:31 PM

I'm surprised myself that it didn't make much of a difference. I just ordered a fan controller 4x 120mm fans for the side chassis and a 140mm to replace the rear exhaust. I will be taking the stock 140mm and moving it to the bottom of the case as an intake.
Currently at stock settings on gpu they reach 80-85celius in furmark stability test at 4-7 mins. Cpu reach 55-60 with prime 95(clocked at 4.8). So with the way the cpu cooler was positioned before it would make sense that the cpu would reach higher temps. One thing I realized earlier is that I don't test them at the same time. So when I tested my cpu my gpu temps were around 30. I also used battlefield 3 but, it was difficult to see if there was any difference or not. Even though I couldn't see it I do believe this is a better placement for the cpu cooler and hopefully the new fans will do a better job at moving that hot air out.
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February 3, 2012 5:03:49 PM

If you do Benchmark & CPU stress tests expect that the temp will go up. What's important is the idle temp then the highest temp of both your CPU & GPU while gaming (let's say for 1 to 2 hours).

For quick CPU stress testing I usually run Intel Burn Test v2. Set the level to Maximum Stress Level & not the other less stress levels.

It should be hard for you to pass the stress testing at maximum stress level as it will really heat up all your CPU cores to the max. If you PC can tolerate the heat then it's OK.
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February 4, 2012 5:33:57 AM

With last test I ran everything at max and my CPU max temp was 65. I'll update again after the new set of fans come in.
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February 4, 2012 1:56:03 PM

Can you do an Intel Burn Test (Maximum Stress Level) & post the result here.
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a c 111 à CPUs
a c 249 K Overclocking
February 4, 2012 4:47:45 PM

In your first picture the Noctua intake fan looks almost on the video card, so re-orienting it's flow direction to a front to rear setup at least fully opened access to the 120mm fans intake, which logically should have improved cooling performance and if it didn't, then I suggest you have more problems regarding case airflow.

Now I know this thread is directly addressed to Rubix & Cheaptrix but I would like to share some tips with you to improve your overall case airflow, no matter how good a cooler you have, if it cannot get air to it, it cannot do but so much.

It looks like your graphics cards exhaust their heat inside the case so if your case airflow is impeded you're at a serious disadvantage right out of the gate, because you have to get that built up heat out.

The way your case is designed from the pictures you posted the lower front intake fan is almost useless blocked by the built in hard drive carriage, a traditional case design.

The way your case is designed you need side panel air input, if you don't have clearance inside the case mount the fan on the outside, if you have any case modding skills that would be a serious benefit to you, as you could add a side fan where it would do the most good for your situation.

I cannot see from your pictures what top exhaust you have, but exhausting the heat is of utmost importance!

Heres some cooling improvement possibilities for your consideration.

Move the rear exhaust fan to the outside of the case.

Change to better performing cooling fans in the Noctua these are Scythe Slip Stream 120mm.

Create an air tunnel directly across from the Noctua intake to supply fresh outside air.

Move top fans outside if at all possible.

This is overkill I know, I had 2 old 140mm fans I gutted the fan motor out of the frame and used them as shrouds to space the mounted 140mm fans, they effectively created vacuum chimneys and work better than I though they would.

Mount a fan on the outside of your side panel if you need to to get more intake airflow.

I hope these pictures give you some ideas that may help your situation. Ryan
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February 4, 2012 11:13:25 PM

Another good solution is to add a shroud on the CPU cooler & run it straight to the rear exhaust fan. It should not be that hard cuz you already turn the CPU cooler around as we have suggested & it's now about an inch & a half close to the rear exhaust fan.
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February 6, 2012 5:58:09 PM

The case has a 230mm side fan which I am changing to 4x 120mm side fans. Also, adding more powerful rear exhaust and moving the current exhaust fan to the bottom of the case as intake. Will update after the fans/controller get here(should be Thursday). I do like the shroud idea.
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February 9, 2012 6:42:12 AM

Fans came in but still waiting on controller. Rare that anything ordered from Amazon takes this long but *shrug*.
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February 10, 2012 8:33:46 AM

Installed the 4x120mm fans today and added a 120mm fan at the bottom(with a neat blue led). CPU temps are the same, which is fine, and video card temps are much better. Dropped an average of 12 degrees with fans at 1300 rpm. I did try with fans at 2000 rpm but it didn't make that much of a difference.
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Best solution

February 10, 2012 12:46:07 PM

You could do a lot better with airflow I think by removing the drive cage behind the front intake fan & moving your (2) SSD drives (are those M4s?) & buying an SSD holder (around $5) that you can place in one of your 5" drive bays.

I think it not just the speed of fans that plays a significant part in good air cooling. It's how you position your fans is very significant too. If you have a very speedy intake fans, you also need to have a very speedy exhaust fans to equalized those. Otherwised, lots of warm air will just circulate inside your case & not getting removed as fast.

I'm interested in seeing your Intel Burn Test result at maximum level. You should not be having a big problem with airflow as you have a very large case.
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February 10, 2012 5:37:30 PM

Yes those are m4's and I prefer they stay there. My heat issues were only with my video cards not my cpu but here are the results.

http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll16/mephistois/inte...

The rear exhaust is being changed to a higher rpm fan but, I mainly did this to add led lighting not because I need more exhaust. I left both exhaust plugged into power so they run full speed. The reason for adding the 4x120 in the side was to help move air away from the video cards. It seems to be working so far.
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February 12, 2012 2:58:54 PM

Can you do an Intel Burn Test at the highest level (not very high level but maximum level)?
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February 12, 2012 6:40:08 PM

I can when I get home from work which will be a few days.
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February 23, 2012 4:13:53 PM

Best answer selected by mephistois.
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