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The Windows / 64 bit is showing 4 GB ( Usable 3 GB

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April 8, 2010 1:12:48 PM

Dear All I just install the windows 7 pro 64 bit. I have a MBO
http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview. [...] 333-GLAN/M
I have 4 GB RAM in two slots.
The Windows is showing 4 GB ( Usable 3 GB ).
I check the bios and it is reading 4 GB. I enabele the "extra memory fuction on bios - remaping" But no suces !!!
I have a primary card NVidia Gt8800 with 1 GB of graf. card memory.

So waht is the problem??
Dou recomend to get new firmware for BIOS? I have the first version of bios ?

a b } Memory
a b $ Windows 7
April 8, 2010 2:40:50 PM

The points where you can 'read' usage data differ in how they measure and report data. Often counting cached and swapped data as 'in memory'. While this is technically accurate from a software perspective, it does not directly relate to actual usage of the physical DIMMS.

The easiest way to get an overview of what is going on is to open Resource Monitor - There is a tab for Memory usage which is pretty self explanatory:

Hardware Reserved (gray) This is physical memory that is set aside by the BIOS and other hardware drivers, and can not be used for anything else.

In Use (green) In active use by Windows, running processes, or by device drivers. This is the number that matters: If you consistently fill this green bar across the entire length of the graph, then you are trying to push your physical RAM beyond its capacity. Consider upgrades if that is the case.

Modified (orange) This represents pages of memory that can be used by other programs but would have to be written to the page file before they can be reused.

Standby (blue) This is the amount of memory that Windows 7 is using for cacheing ('Superfetch', etc). It tries very hard to keep this as full as possible. If you start a new process that needs memory, the lowest-priority pages on this list are discarded and made available to the new process. This is transparent to the user and to applications, and should not interfere at all with performance.

Free (light blue) As I pointed out above, Windows Vista and 7 try very hard to avoid leaving any memory completely free. Over time, Windows will use idle cycles to slowly fill this up with items it thinks you may use. This is at a very low priority and will not interfere with system performance.





A: 1. If you're *sure* you're running the 64 bit version of the OS, from here I see two possibilities. The first is your motherboard may have a limitation - either by design or by BIOS setting. Check your motherboard's support page to verify your motherboard actually supports 4GB of ram or more. Then check your BIOS for a feature called Memory Remapping. If Memory remapping options appear in the BIOS at all, make sure it is turned on.

2. Click the Start orb, and type in msconfig. Right click the msconfig app to run it as Administrator. That brings up the configuration utility. Click the Boot tab, and then click the Advanced Options button. In that window, there is a setting for Maximum Memory - Make sure the checkbox for it is clear (not checked), then reboot your computer.


April 8, 2010 5:16:53 PM

I will like to send you the foto off system. I just upgrade firmware, swich the slots of RAM. NOTING IS HELPING ME !! SO PLEAS HELP
!