Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

$1,500 multi-tasking, non-game, non-video machine

Last response: in Systems
Share
October 17, 2009 5:36:28 AM

Friends:
I have always bought pre-built machines before. But now, I am planning to purchase a custom built machine from www.PCBuzz.com who was recommended to me by several other old-timers in the CompuServe Hardware Forum (I used to punch holes in IBM cards--yeh, old as dirt). PCBuzz will put together just about anything I request (with your assistance).

My needs:
I multi-task to extremes; I will have Firefox open with 15 tabs, and its gadgets (such as updating weather feeds), MS Outlook, a pdf reader with multiple tabs open, my LAN, other MS Office apps. open--all at the same time. And, because
I do not maintain my system well, lots of processes running at all times.

I replace my computers every 5 years after a new OS comes out. I don't maintain them well, e.g., keep the Start-ups to a minimum.

The Dell XPS--which I want to replace--is running extremely slowly. It sounds like it is laboring when I multitask--the fan goes into super high--very noisy. I want a quiet, yet fast machine that will last 5 years. I hate the hassle of replacement sooner than that. I have used only 90 GB of my existing HDD. I want to overbuild a bit, so that I can coast into year 5.

I can certainly afford a $1,500 computer and justify it easily because of the amount of time I spend using & enjoying it. MS Office will push it to $1,600.

I would be very grateful for any suggestions or comments you have about my proposed choices. I don't need to be cutting edge, but I do want a FAST & QUIET machine that can do its job well for 5 years.

Here is the machine I am contemplating. Remember, I don't play games or edit video, but do want a snappy, responsive machine:

• Processor Intel Core i7 Processor i7-920 2.66GHz 8MB LGA1366 CPU, Retail (BX80601920)

• Cooling Fan Standard Intel Original Fan (STDFAN)

• Motherboard  INTEL MB CI7 BOXDX58SO QPI DDR3-1600 AUD+LAN RAID SATA ATX RETAIL (BOXDX58SO)

• Memory  6GB PC-10600 1333Mhz DDR3 KIT (3x2GB) (OCZ3P13331G)

• Primary Hard Disk Intel 80 GB Solid State Drive SSDSA2MH080G2C1

• Secondary Hard Drive  Seagate Barracuda 380GB SATA 16MB Cache
7200RPM (ST3320613AS)
or
• Western Digital Caviar Black 640 GB, 32 MB cache

• Video Card GeForce 210 512MB Dual DVI

• Primary Optical Drive  LG Electronics GGC-H20LK LightScribe Blu-ray/HD DVD Combo Drive (GGC-H20LK)

• Secondary DVD RW drive: Sony Optiarc AD-7240S-0B

• Case  Antec Sonata III (comes with the following PSU)

• Power Supply  Antec Earth Watts EA 500 ATX 500 Watt

• Operating System  Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64-bit (Professional to get compatibility with older programs)

• Software Office Basic 2007
October 17, 2009 6:03:05 PM

Hey...welcome from another PCHardware veteran....wonder if I'm still listed as "on staff" there......haven't been there at all in last year or so.....felt there were too many cranky old men there so I left and now there's one less :) 

Those HD's are awful small....with 1 TB costing $89, seems wise to plan for future needs. In a small case, I'd opt for the cool running 7200.12 1 TB model.

The NVidia OEM cards. or ones that just came outta OEM status are not being well received. Not that they are a bad card, just priced too high for what they were designed to accomplish.

http://www.anandtech.com/video/showdoc.aspx?i=3657&p=15

I haven't put MS Office on a box in at least 5 years. I can't tell you how many people I know who migrated from MS Office 2003 to 2007 only to replace the latter with Open Office cause it's "more like 2003".

I see that MoBo is listed as "no longer available" on many web sites so I'd opt for something with a little more "legs" like the Asus P6T or P6TD
m
0
l
October 17, 2009 7:20:13 PM

An i7 860 would server you better, you dont need the triple channel ram or the extra PCI-E lanes that the X58 chipset offers you.

Total is $1065
Antec Sonata III w/ EA500 $110

Samsung Spinpoint F3 500GB $55

XFX 4650 $50

Gskills Ripjaws 4GB 1600MHz DDR3 CL7 $95

Intel i7 860 and ASUS P7P55D EVO $455

Intel X25-M 80GB Gen II $300

That will give you lots of options for expandibility, however just cleaning out your system once in a while, cleaning the dust from the case and the extra programs from the drive, will restore a fair amount of speed.
m
0
l
Related resources
October 18, 2009 4:05:49 AM

Hey...welcome from another PCHardware veteran....wonder if I'm still listed as "on staff" there....
+++Yeh, Dale Shields is as grumpy as ever. Irwin, Hugh all still there.

Those HD's are awful small....with 1 TB costing $89, seems wise to plan for future needs. In a small case, I'd opt for the cool running 7200.12 1 TB model.
+++Hell, I just can't get beyond 90 GBs on my current HD. WHat with the 80 GB SSD and another 300+ GBs I'm sure I'll be fine, or I'll just plug in another one later. I've considered this, and I want no more than 300--500GB. It's not about $.

The NVidia OEM cards. or ones that just came outta OEM status are not being well received. Not that they are a bad card, just priced too high for what they were designed to accomplish.
+++So, are you referring to the new 200 Series? Dale recommended steering clear of boards with Turbo Cache because they can steal some of your system RAM. You agree? The current card I have does all I need: ATI Radeon X800 XT.
Knowing what I am trying to build, what LOW WATTAGE, QUIET running video card might you recommend for <$100?


I see that MoBo is listed as "no longer available" on many web sites so I'd opt for something with a little more "legs" like the Asus P6T or P6TD
+++Really? Why do I care? Do you think I may wish to upgrade or something? By legs, what do you mean Jack? This was the board recommended by the builder. A cheaper option offered by the builder is: Asus P6T Deluxe Core i7 / Intel X58/ DDR3/ CrossFireX & SLI/ A&2GbE/ ATX Motherboard . But, he recommended spending $30 more for the INTEL MB CI7 BOXDX58SO QPI DDR3-1600 AUD+LAN RAID SATA ATX RETAIL.

Thanks for your input Jack.
RO
m
0
l
October 18, 2009 4:44:53 AM

hunter315 said:
An i7 860 would server you better, you dont need the triple channel ram or the extra PCI-E lanes that the X58 chipset offers you.


What is your reasoning here Hunter? I have heard from AnandTech that the Lynnfields are just stripped down versions of the Bloomfields. The Core i7 920 seems like a good value now. You say I "don't need the triple channel ram or the extra PCI-E lanes" but is there a downside to going with the X58 chipset? Remember, I want this system to last me 5 years.
I will look at the i7 860 more thoroughly. It appears that I have missed a lot of reviews of it. Thanks. I'm still flexible.

Hey, thanks for pricing out the system. That is greatly appreciated. Money is secondary to a long lasting machine that is QUIET & RESPONSIVE & CAN MULTI-TASK TO EXTREMES.

Do you think I have chosen a QUIET case and power supply?

I like your video card choice. What is your opinion of the GeForce 9600 GSO? It is the card the builder chose?


Thank you for taking the time to review my proposed system.
m
0
l
October 18, 2009 4:55:12 AM

The i7 860 performs very similar to the 920, slightly outperforming it in some cases as seen here
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-core-i5,2410-...

the LGA 1156 processors come with better turbo boost which will let them outperform an i7 920 in single threaded applications. The LGA 1366 platform was originally designed for servers, hence the larger memory bandwidth, very few applications will benefit from it.

I am a very value oriented person(aka poor college student) so i tend to suggest things that fit the bill, rather than fill the budget, which is why i suggested an i7 860 build over an i7 920 because they perform the same but the LGA 1156 platform costs significantly less.

The case should be very quiet, i can vouch for the PSU, i cant tell if the fan on mine is running or not, i feel a slight breeze but i dont hear anything.

As for the video card, the 9600 GSO is slightly more powerful but also generates more heat, the 4650 should be more than enough for your needs. Hopefully ATI releases a low end 40nm card, one with the performance of the 4670 would be easy to passively cool.
m
0
l
October 18, 2009 5:09:08 AM

rorser said:
My needs:
I multi-task to extremes; I will have Firefox open with 15 tabs, and its gadgets (such as updating weather feeds), MS Outlook, a pdf reader with multiple tabs open, my LAN, other MS Office apps. open--all at the same time.
Are you working with a 2nd monitor? Sounds like that type of setup is tailor made for how you use your computer.

Dusted the inside of your computer lately? That laboring fan might be a sign of high heat which also might be slowing down the CPU (to avoid overheating).

The X58 chipsets are enthusiast parts with multiple 16 lane PCI-e slots for video cards. For your use, you'd be paying for features you won't be using.

If the choices were i7 920 & X58 or i7 860 & P55 plus a 2nd monitor - I'd go for the i7 860 everytime.



m
0
l
October 18, 2009 5:54:34 AM

No, I do not have a second monitor. But, I have been told before that a 2nd monitor really does increase productivity for a small outlay. Actually, I sit 5 feet from a 37" DVI 1920X 1080 Septre monitor. So, perhaps I should make sure that the video card I choose suppoerts 2 DVI monitors, Hey, i'm getting good advice here. THanks.

Yes, I vacuum out my Dell XPS case regularly.

>>If the choices were i7 920 & X58 or i7 860 & P55 plus a 2nd monitor - I'd go for the i7 860 everytime. <<
I had previously read this Adrian Kinglsey-Hughes take on the Lynnfields:
http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5364&tag=col1;post-5364#more-5364
which made it sound like the Lynnfields were a scaled down Bloomfield just to get another round of lesser processors.
However, the Anand reviews make the i7 860 sound like a good choice.
So, leaving off the 2nd monitor (which I assume I could have with either chip set, would you still say:
"If the choice were i7 920 & X58 or i7 860 & P55 - I'd go for the i7 860 everytime."
Please keep in mind that MULTITASKING is my heaviest requirement.

>>For your use, you'd be paying for features you won't be using. << I thought that the i7 920 & the i7 860 were the same price ($284).

Thanks a lot for your help, Richard
m
0
l
October 18, 2009 6:26:44 AM

hunter315 said:
The i7 860 performs very similar to the 920, slightly outperforming it in some cases as seen here
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-core-i5,2410-...
Unfortunately these tests do not address the 860, just the expensive 870.

the LGA 1156 processors come with better turbo boost which will let them outperform an i7 920 in single threaded applications. The LGA 1366 platform was originally designed for servers, hence the larger memory bandwidth, very few applications will benefit from it.
I had heard this server design for the i7 920 before. So, it sounds like I can have a processor better suited to my multi-tasking and pay less. What a deal!

I am a very value oriented person(aka poor college student) so i tend to suggest things that fit the bill, rather than fill the budget, which is why i suggested an i7 860 build over an i7 920 because they perform the same but the LGA 1156 platform costs significantly less.
But, aren't you also saying that if money were no object that I would still be better off with the i7 860?

Thanks again for all your help. I really do appreciate your taking the time.

m
0
l
October 18, 2009 6:41:13 AM

rorser said:
I thought that the i7 920 & the i7 860 were the same price ($284).

Correct. But the differences are in the X58 and P55 motherboards and 6GB vs 4GB RAM prices.

The Sysmark 2007 - Productivity chart is the 'multi-tasking' benchmark that would be closest to how you use your computer.

In that same chart you'll notice that a C2D E8600 isn't doing too badly hanging in with the higher tech quad cores. So being a 'lesser processor' isn't necessarily a down check.

A dual monitor setup would work equally well with either motheboard and most video cards. It's not a demanding task for even a modest budget video card.
Another feature I can't live without on at least one of my monitors is Portrait mode, or vertical orientation.


m
0
l
October 18, 2009 6:46:10 AM

>>Gskills Ripjaws 4GB 1600MHz DDR3 CL7 $95<<
Am I correct that with the Bloomfields, you need 3, 6, or 12 sticks, but with the Lynnfield (i7 860) I'd buy them in different sets (pairs)? What is the next step up from 4GB that will be usable by the 860?
R
m
0
l
October 18, 2009 6:52:05 AM

You could go with 6GB (2x2GB + 2x1GB) but the price difference between 6 and 8 isnt that great. Most of us around here would recommend 8GB.
I wouldnt argue against getting the CL8 model either. It's a very slight difference in performance, so slight you'd not be able to notice. You can measure the difference in benchmarks but not in actual usage.
m
0
l
October 18, 2009 7:29:03 AM


XFX 4650 $50

Isn't there a fanless version of the 4650? I read there was. And, what's all this about DDR2 vs. DDR3 and GDDR3 memory?

I'd prefer a fanless version if possible.

R
m
0
l
October 18, 2009 8:08:22 AM

Some fanless video cards

DDR3 has higher bandwidth (good) and higher latency (bad) compared to DDR2.
GDDR3 - the G stands for Graphics as in video cards.
m
0
l
October 18, 2009 8:24:54 AM

you pay for windows and office? LOL

I would go p55+ i7 860 and 4gb of ram in your position

the rest seems fine
m
0
l
October 18, 2009 8:49:27 AM

I recently went through a similar decision making process. I started out thinking that an i7 920 system ($280 Newegg) would be great, but a mainstream motherboard (Asus or EVGA; ~$280 Newegg) for this processor is very expensive.

Then the P55 motherboards hit the streets, and I thought an i7 860 processor would be perfect to save a few dollars. I was all set to buy this system, when I saw that Microcenter was running a deal where I could get the i5 750 processor ($140) with a Gigabyte P55-UD3R motherboard ($140) for a combo price of $280. The Microcenter prices are only valid for in-store pickup. So unless you live close to a Microcenter, the price comparisons between Newegg and Microcenter are not valid.

So whats the difference between the i860 processor and i750 processor? The i860 is slightly faster (2.80 vs 2.66 GHz). The i860 processor also has Intel virtualization and trusted execution technology (check the Intel website for definitions of these marketing terms), which sound cool, but are not necessary for my needs.

My point is that you might want to consider the i5 750 processor as a low budget alternative that has an excellent performance / price ratio. By the way, the i750 processor had slightly better performance than the i920 processor in the Sysmark test link provided by WR2 above.
m
0
l
October 18, 2009 1:33:18 PM

rorser said:
++Hell, I just can't get beyond 90 GBs on my current HD. WHat with the 80 GB SSD and another 300+ GBs I'm sure I'll be fine, or I'll just plug in another one later. I've considered this, and I want no more than 300--500GB. It's not about $.


There's also speed to consider....a) those small size models are generally older models with lower areal density. Higher density means faster as more data going past the head each second. The other thing is HD's are about half as fast at the inside edge as the outside. So let's say the top speed is 120 MB/sec at outside edge and 60 at inside. With your 90 GB, ona 1 TB drive, you will be on the outside 9% of the disk all the time (aka short stroking) meaning your speed shouldn't drop below 91% of full or 114 MB /sec. The older drive will start out slower, and drop to 85% of full speed

Quote:
The current card I have does all I need: ATI Radeon X800 XT.


Then I'd stay with it till springtime when all the faster, better, quieter, super tweaked cards will be out from ATI and you'll also be able to check out what nVidia has in the mix.

Quote:
Knowing what I am trying to build, what LOW WATTAGE, QUIET running video card might you recommend for <$100?


It depends on how long you keep ya cards.....if > 2 years, I'd get a 5770 ....less than 2 years a GTX 260 or 4870.

http://www.anandtech.com/video/showdoc.aspx?i=3658&p=14

"The value of the 5770 in particular is clearly not going to be in its performance. Compared to AMD’s 4870, it loses well more than it wins, and if we throw out Far Cry 2, it’s around 10% slower overall. It also spends most of its time losing to NVIDIA’s GTX 260, which unfortunately the 4870 didn’t have so much trouble with. AMD clearly has put themselves in to a hole with memory bandwidth, and the 5770 doesn’t have enough of it to reach the performance it needs to be at. If you value solely performance in today’s games, we can’t recommend the 5770. Either the 4870 1GB or the GTX 260 would be the better buy.

But don’t mistake that for a wholesale write-off of the 5770. As a 40nm product it’s cooler running and quieter than a 4870 or a GTX 260. As a DirectX 11 product it has longer legs to run on for future games and/or applications using DirectCompute 5.0. Eyefinity is also there, but with the performance of the card, (not to mention the cost of more monitors) it’s not something we’d seriously expect to see used on a 5770.

AMD believes that DirectX 11 is the key to the success of the Radeon 5700 series, and in a way they’re right. If DirectX 11 takes off quickly, then buying a 5770 over a 4870 or GTX 260 right now would be a wise buy. But that’s a future that’s hard to predict, and something we got burnt on somewhat with DX10 and DX10.1."


Quote:
+++Really? Why do I care? Do you think I may wish to upgrade or something? By legs, what do you mean Jack? This was the board recommended by the builder. A cheaper option offered by the builder is: Asus P6T Deluxe Core i7 / Intel X58/ DDR3/ CrossFireX & SLI/ A&2GbE/ ATX Motherboard . But, he recommended spending $30 more for the INTEL MB CI7 BOXDX58SO QPI DDR3-1600 AUD+LAN RAID SATA ATX RETAIL.


Well sellers are likely to want to push out old stock. But by "legs" I mean "how long will it be supported ?" For example, if Win7 SP2 requires an upgrade of the driver for some on board component, will Intel still be bothering to put the new drivers up on their site? My thinking is, if it's a better board, why have retailers stopped selling it ? I'd save the $30 and get the Asus, especially the Deluxe.

The other thing worth mentioning as others have, if you really don't need the bandwidth, the i5 is a choice to consider. The i5 is out though if you think you might ever use a 2nd video card. You are paying quite a premium for SI / XFire capability so if you're not ever going to usee it, you can save quite a few bucks with X55 an i5. The other exception would be memory bandwidth and if you were doing video editing, photo worl, AutoCAD etc., I'd also say stay with the i7.....whether all those browser tabs would benifit from that kind of bandwidth I can't say.
m
0
l
October 19, 2009 6:39:16 AM

I'm convinced! i7-860 -- P55 it will be. With 8 GB RAM. Thank you.

Thanks for that Sysmark link. It helped convince me.

Could you suggest a mobo? My nephew is a computer scientist at Stanford U. He encouraged me to get one a "Northbridge heat pipe passive cooling" He also said to get one that did NOT use electrolytic capacitors, but rather solid state or ceramic capacitors. What are your thoughts?

I am also trying to find a very quiet, low wattage video card. Someone told me that ATi have chinzy fans. Hunter has suggested the Radeon 4650, which seems like a good choice at 50 watts & $50. Are your familiar with this card? Because of what you have said, I would like to get a version that will support two DVI monitors. Not sure the XFX does.

Thanks for all your help. R.
m
0
l
October 19, 2009 6:59:33 AM

hunter315 said:
As for the video card, the 9600 GSO is slightly more powerful but also generates more heat, the 4650 should be more than enough for your needs. Hopefully ATI releases a low end 40nm card, one with the performance of the 4670 would be easy to passively cool.


OK, I'm convinced. I will go for the CORE i7 860 1156 P55 setup with 8 GB RAM. It really does sound like what I need and want.

As for the mother board, I would appreciate your input. I wrote WR2 that I was strongly encouraged to get a mobo with Northbridge heat pipe/passive cooling and solid state capacitors, or at least not electrolytic capacitors. What do you suggest?

As for the Radeon 4650, it seems perfect with its low wattage. But the XFX has only one DVI output. Is there a well-made, QUIET version of the 4650 with two? Have you used this card, and is it quiet?

Thank you, Richard
m
0
l
October 19, 2009 7:14:23 AM

messerchmidt said:
I would go p55+ i7 860 and 4gb of ram in your position

the rest seems fine


Thanks, that is what I will do, altho I can afford 8 GB of RAM, so will go for it.

Any suggestion for a high quality mobo?

Thanks, RO
m
0
l
October 19, 2009 7:25:50 AM

WR2 said:
Some fanless video cards

DDR3 has higher bandwidth (good) and higher latency (bad) compared to DDR2.
GDDR3 - the G stands for Graphics as in video cards.


Thank you so much for finding those fanless video cards for me. The HIS 512 MB one should be perfect with the two DVI outputs for two monitors. BTW, how did you search for those? I was not so successful.

So, DDR3 is the same as GDDR3?

Thanks a lot. Richard
m
0
l
October 19, 2009 2:20:09 PM

HIS is a good MFGR and has specialized in quiet cooling alternative video cards for quite a while.
The "Power Search" feature at NewEgg produced those results.
DDR3 is not the same as GDDR3 even if they serve much the same type of function. RAM and VRAM are not interchangeable.

The Asus MB does not use the 'wet' electrolytic capacitors but uses polymer capacitors (which are sometimes wrongly called solid state).

And I agree that starting out with 4GB of RAM is probably a very good thing to do.
m
0
l
October 20, 2009 12:39:56 AM

dpaul8 said:
My point is that you might want to consider the i5 750 processor as a low budget alternative that has an excellent performance / price ratio. By the way, the i750 processor had slightly better performance than the i920 processor in the Sysmark test link provided by WR2 above.

I did give the i5 serious consideration, but the cost is not a big issue for this machine (fortunately).
I am more concerned about choosing the mobo and optical BluRay drive right now.
Thanks for your interest,
m
0
l
October 20, 2009 12:46:48 AM

So Jack,
Now that I am going with the 1135 Core i7 860, can you suggest a good mobo WITH LEGS? :) 

I will not use 2 video cards. I want a cool running board. I was told to get one that has Northbridge heat tube passive cooling. And, to avoic electrolytic capacitors.

That's all I know.

Thanks,
m
0
l
October 20, 2009 4:40:37 AM

WR2 said:
Here is a CPU/MB combo deal $40 less: i7 860 and ASUS P7P55D (not EVO or Pro model)
The main difference is that the Pro and EVO models are setup for two video cards in Crossfire or SLI mode, and the EVO has a 2nd LAN Chipset. Here is a side-by-side with the Asus P55D family.

So, then you'd go with either of the two cheaper 4 ASUS mobos LE or LGA, right?

What does CF mean in reference to a mobo?

Might you suggest a reliable, inexpensive combo drive for reading BluRay and writing CDs and DVDs?
If I could get a combo BluRay WRITER for $80 more, I'd probably go for it. i will not use the drive often.

Gratefully,
m
0
l
October 20, 2009 2:22:29 PM

CF more than likely stands for CrossFireX = linking 2 video cards for extra 3d graphics power in gaming.

This LG Bluray ROM DVD Burner is getting mostly good customer reviews over at NewEgg.

There are motherboards with the extra chipset heat tube passive cooling you mentioned. A few examples:
ASUS P7P55 WS SuperComputer / BIOSTAR TPOWER i55 / DFI LANParty DK / Foxconn Inferno Katana / GIGABYTE GA-P55-UD5 / MSI P55-GD80
These are all premium boards (with prices to match) and geared to enthusiast overclockers and the type of people who will be running two (or more) powerful and hot video cards.
A review of the MSI P55-GD80 Motherboard
And here are pictures of the ASUS P7P55D and ASUS P7P55 WS SuperComputer

Since you're not overclocking and have a single modest video card going into your system I think a Asus P7P55D is a good match for you.

I did look at the ASUS P7P55D LE (lite edition) but found that $40 off combo deal on the ASUS P7P55D has the relative price advantage.

m
0
l
October 21, 2009 5:47:55 AM

I think I can do with the standard ASUS board. Thanks. You are correct, of course, without overclocking and multiple video cards, I really don't need to be spending an extra $100+ for the ASUS P7P55 WS SuperComputer .

I think I am almost ready to make my move, thanks to all your help.

I just have to pick an optical drive.
The builder has these: Pioneer DVDRW DVR-215DBK High Speed Dual Format Drive SATA 2MB
But, he may just be trying to clean off his shelves. I will use the drive rarely, just for archiving and copying an occasional CD for the car.
Any suggestions WR2?
m
0
l
October 21, 2009 1:04:17 PM

Pioneer DVR-215DBK, even if 'left on the shelf' is a better than average unit. It got unusually high customer reviews from NewEgg while it was sold there (a bit more than a year ago) and it got a CDRInfo's Editor's Choice award.

If you are getting a combo Blu-ray reader + DVD writer you probably don't need this 2nd optical drive.
m
0
l
October 21, 2009 9:52:06 PM

WR2 said:
Pioneer DVR-215DBK, even if 'left on the shelf' is a better than average unit. It got unusually high customer reviews from NewEgg while it was sold there (a bit more than a year ago) and it got a CDRInfo's Editor's Choice award.

If you are getting a combo Blu-ray reader + DVD writer you probably don't need this 2nd optical drive.


I just found out that my old 37" monitor DOES support HDCP and that I can view Blu-Ray movies on it! So, I am in the market for a combo CD/DVD/BluRay drive (Blue Ray reader only, not writer).
Tentatively, I have chosen this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
LG Black 8X BD-ROM 16X DVD-ROM 40X CD-ROM SATA Internal Blu-ray Reader & 16x DVD Burner - Bulk Model UH08LS10K LightScribe Support - OEM
But, WR2, if you have a better choice I would really love to hear from you.
I must thank you for your patience and help. You have been a real asset for me in building this machine.
Gratefully, Richard
m
0
l
October 21, 2009 10:23:28 PM

That LG Bluray ROM DVD Burner is the same one I recommended above.
Be sure to let us know how things turn out.
m
0
l
October 21, 2009 10:30:17 PM

WR2 said:
That LG Bluray ROM DVD Burner is the same one I recommended above.
Be sure to let us know how things turn out.


Oh, right, duh! That's why it is on my BUY LIST. Thanks.

This will format like crap, but here is what I am proposing to have PC Buzz build for me. If you can afford the time, I would appreciate your review of it.

Processor Intel Core i7 Processor i7-860 $290

Motherboard ASUS P7P55D (Part # N82E16813131404) not the LE model. $150 Combo mobo & i7-860 http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...
$415


Memory 8GB DDR3 1333Mhz $200

Primary Hard Disk Intel 80 GB Solid State Drive SSDSA2MH080G2C1 $300

Secondary Hard Drive Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 ST3320418AS 320GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive .12 not .11 Pasted from <http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...;
$50

Video Card HIS H465PS512P Radeon, fan-less, HD 4650 512MB 128-bit GDDR2 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready Cross Fire Supported Video Card - Retail http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$53
(after $10 Rebate)

Optical Drive
LG Black 8X BD-ROM 16X DVD-ROM 40X CD-ROM SATA Internal Blu-ray Reader & 16x DVD Burner - UH08LS10K LightScribe Support
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$100


Case Antec Sonata III $110

Power Supply Antec Earth Watts EA 500 ATX 500 Watt Included in case price $0.00

Operating System Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64-bit (Professional to get compatibility with older programs) $150

Software Office Basic 2007 $170

TOTAL $1,548

m
0
l
October 21, 2009 10:47:10 PM

The Intel X25-M G2 (Gen2) is the SSD model you want and what you have listed.
If you're spending that amount of money for 80GB of storage you want the G2.

Everything looks good to me.
Do you have any WinXP programs you know will need Win7 Pro's XP Virtual Machine (VM) mode?
m
0
l
October 22, 2009 12:27:47 AM

WR2 said:


Everything looks good to me.
Do you have any WinXP programs you know will need Win7 Pro's XP Virtual Machine (VM) mode?


Thank your for the VM link and the suggestion that I consider what XP programs, if any, won't work in Win 7. There are none that I know will need XP Virtual. I was being lazy, to be honest. I figured I'd cover my ass. But, I know that the professional is going to load more processes and slow things down a bit. It's only $35 more. What is the worst that could happen if I encounter one? I have a Vista machine that I could use to run things on if necessary. For example, I doubt my Canon scanner is going to work with Windows 7 (I got a response from them by e-mail saying that it would not.) I could plug that into my Vista machine.
Maybe I should just go through my whole program list to figure out what might have problems.

What is the downside to getting Professional, other than the $35?

Thank you,
m
0
l

Best solution

October 22, 2009 4:18:02 PM

rorser said:
But, I know that the professional is going to load more processes and slow things down a bit. It's only $35 more. What is the worst that could happen if I encounter one? I have a Vista machine that I could use to run things on if necessary.
With TurboMode available, four CPU cores and 8 working threads the extra processes shouldn't be an issue.

Most WinXP program that ran on Vista should run on Win7 (as long at the Vista was 64bit). When possible you'll want to get all your programs running on Win7 and the Microsoft Application Compatibility Toolkit (ACT) can help balky XP programs run nicely on Vista or Win7. But its not an easy toolkit to master. The XP VM is an option to run XP programs but its not exactly the same thing as having it actually running on Win7.

The only downside to getting Win7 Pro might be that $35 might buy you the upgrade version of that one WinXP program you can't live without. Which isn't much of a downside if your WinXP program library is still fairly large.

Here is a great chart that compares the features of Win7 that each version has: Windows 7 Editions: A Comparison
Share
October 23, 2009 1:50:00 AM

>>that $35 might buy you the upgrade version of that one WinXP program you can't live without. <<
Good, point. I will just use that $35 to update the program--if necessary, and it may not ever be.
I placed my order. Total cost $1,625. I will have it Friday PCBuzz says. www.pcbuzz.com.

I can't thank you enough for all your help WR2.
Richad
m
0
l
October 23, 2009 7:19:00 AM

Oh, and that Win 7 comparison link you sent is great. I have shared it with others. Thanks WR2.
R
m
0
l
October 24, 2009 2:52:23 PM

The major advantage to buying a "higher" version now rather than later is the cost. Compare the $30 (OEM copy) now to the $100 if you want to upgrade later.....the Pro to Ultimate OTOH is only $20 (well was pre release, haven't checked lately) where as the OEM costs $40 more so the smart money says Buy pro OEM and then upgrade.

Used to be computer heavy families went Pro cause they had more than 5 PC's in the house and Pro would let you do 10, but all versions of Win7 have 20 SMB's which allows for ten 2 way network connections.

Pro gets ya the 192 GB RAM limit which is kinda superfluous, but things like network desired are considered valuable in many homes this days.
m
0
l
October 24, 2009 8:37:07 PM

Thanks Jack.
I decided that Home Premium is enough, and less is sometimes better.
I should have my system next week!
Can't wait. Thanks for all your help with creating it.
R
m
0
l
!