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Should I worry about rotary bending?

Last response: in Overclocking
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February 6, 2012 3:10:16 AM

as you can see on left picture the bottom rotary is bending as the middle rotating space has more distance compared to the other rotary.

what should I do, keep it or replace with a straight?

More about : worry rotary bending

a b K Overclocking
February 6, 2012 11:31:45 AM

Looks like it could be 2 different fittings, a 22º and a 45º, hard to tell.
If they work, leave them.
If the difference annoys you that much, change them out.

Edit; Personally, I wouldn't have the res. sitting directly over the psu
a c 330 K Overclocking
February 6, 2012 12:47:02 PM

You should never have enough stress on fittings to do that. If you do, you routed tubing incorrectly and are using the wrong fittings for the job. It's very hard to see what you are talking about, but I get what you are saying. That much stress is going to lead to leaks much sooner than later- if not from the fitting, where the res threads are.
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February 6, 2012 9:27:31 PM

rubix_1011 said:
You should never have enough stress on fittings to do that. If you do, you routed tubing incorrectly and are using the wrong fittings for the job. It's very hard to see what you are talking about, but I get what you are saying. That much stress is going to lead to leaks much sooner than later- if not from the fitting, where the res threads are.



well I think it's because the tube is too short resulting in pulling on both res and pump, however the tube is bent as can see on this picture

a c 330 K Overclocking
February 6, 2012 9:31:56 PM

If tubing is too short, I'd say replace with a longer piece. However, like you stated, the tubing is curved which would suggest enough slack. Wondering if there is just enough tension to pull it offset like that? Hard to say without draining your loop and closer inspection of the fitting.
February 7, 2012 7:09:19 PM

rubix_1011 said:
If tubing is too short, I'd say replace with a longer piece. However, like you stated, the tubing is curved which would suggest enough slack. Wondering if there is just enough tension to pull it offset like that? Hard to say without draining your loop and closer inspection of the fitting.


It could also be from me pressing in hard the tubes to fitting(11mm ID on tube and fittings are 13mm so force is needed).

For these rotary fittings that I have, once there is enough tension the rotary unit gets that gap and will always bend when touching with finger.

so now I have couple of these 45degree with gap and the rest of them do not have the gap when I touch them with finger.
a c 330 K Overclocking
February 7, 2012 7:48:51 PM

For first timers, I'd suggest using same-size tubing and fittings until you understand what you are doing. You really run the risk of cracking around the threads on your components when placing that much stress on a fitting during tubing install.

Flexing smaller ID tubing over larger ID fittings should really be something you do once you have a solid grasp on things- not on your first build, leaving you to ask why your fittings started to leak. Don't be surprised if you don't start seeing leaks at the rotaries and/or around the G1/4" threads of the components.
February 7, 2012 8:01:54 PM

rubix_1011 said:
For first timers, I'd suggest using same-size tubing and fittings until you understand what you are doing. You really run the risk of cracking around the threads on your components when placing that much stress on a fitting during tubing install.

Flexing smaller ID tubing over larger ID fittings should really be something you do once you have a solid grasp on things- not on your first build, leaving you to ask why your fittings started to leak. Don't be surprised if you don't start seeing leaks at the rotaries and/or around the G1/4" threads of the components.


well I saw a youtube watercooling guide where the guy just used his fingers to warm up tube then press it in.

I think it should be difficult to press the tube in to make sure it is tight?

I'm not sure what else do do, Ive heard of people using hot water to soften the tubes...
a c 330 K Overclocking
February 7, 2012 8:14:13 PM

You really would want boiling or very hot water, and even then, I would only recommend it to someone who knows what they are doing. You can easily cause stress fractures if you use too much force.

It also depends a great deal on what kind of tubing he used; thicker tubing would require a lot more heat to flex as much as thin-walled tubing.
February 7, 2012 8:17:44 PM

No he only used his fingers and squeezed it a bit and said to warm it with fingers.
a c 330 K Overclocking
February 7, 2012 8:34:30 PM

Right, everyone that uses this method in enthusiast circles almost always dips the tubing ends in boiling water or very, very hot water to soften, and often for 30 seconds or more.

There is no 'warming with your fingers'...this doesn't provide enough heat for the flexing needed for tubing to stretch like this.
February 7, 2012 9:07:47 PM

rubix_1011 said:
Right, everyone that uses this method in enthusiast circles almost always dips the tubing ends in boiling water or very, very hot water to soften, and often for 30 seconds or more.

There is no 'warming with your fingers'...this doesn't provide enough heat for the flexing needed for tubing to stretch like this.


So if I boil water and then let cool for 5min is that OK?
Ive heard that too much heat can also destroy the tube.

well on this video from 18min 07 sec seems like no hot water.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6qpkigby5w
However it seems to fit fairly easy so might not be 11mm ID and 13mm fitting.

a c 330 K Overclocking
February 7, 2012 11:07:51 PM

Quote:
So if I boil water and then let cool for 5min is that OK?
Ive heard that too much heat can also destroy the tube.


Where did you hear that? I've heard of a lot of enthusiasts using this method...it's silicone/PVC/vinyl based tubing, so really the only damage would be possible cosmetic changes like clouding. However, I haven't heard of this being an issue...boiling water isn't anywhere near hot enough to damage tubing- you only want it very hot and pliable to fit over a barb.

For the video, it's probably the XSPC kit tubing, which would match the fitting size being used. It looks like the correct size match.
February 7, 2012 11:51:17 PM

rubix_1011 said:
Quote:
So if I boil water and then let cool for 5min is that OK?
Ive heard that too much heat can also destroy the tube.


Where did you hear that? I've heard of a lot of enthusiasts using this method...it's silicone/PVC/vinyl based tubing, so really the only damage would be possible cosmetic changes like clouding. However, I haven't heard of this being an issue...boiling water isn't anywhere near hot enough to damage tubing- you only want it very hot and pliable to fit over a barb.

For the video, it's probably the XSPC kit tubing, which would match the fitting size being used. It looks like the correct size match.


I read a review where they tested radiators and said the temperature was getting so high that tubing was in risk of damage.

Honestly I have no idea, I would imagine 100c being too much on tubes?
a c 330 K Overclocking
February 8, 2012 12:00:32 AM

Quote:
I read a review where they tested radiators and said the temperature was getting so high that tubing was in risk of damage.


Please link to this review, if possible. If this was tested/stated as a review, this is very, very incorrect. I'd like to see the testing methods in-use.

You aren't ever going to have a loop that creates temps high enough to damage tubing...if you did, you're talking so much heat that your PC would actually catch fire. A watercooling loop water temp never gets warmer than lukewarm or warm at most.

Boiling isn't too much.
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