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Core Work- Load

Last response: in CPUs
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January 4, 2010 2:26:48 PM

1. What controls the work- load in multi core processors ? :hello: 
2.( Dual core) Why is one core more active in certain tasks ?

Example: (AMD llx2) I notice both cores run fairly even ,but core #1 is slightly more active than #2 by about 2% in most applications.

Exception: When downloading anything core #2 becomes the work horse. When installing programs, runing virus scans, or trouble- shooting core #1 is the work horse.

I would be intrested in articals or an FAQ thread on this subjet . Thanks

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a b à CPUs
January 5, 2010 2:42:50 AM

Well, to answer number 1, the OS manages the workload in multi-core processors. Of course there is a physical chip in the CPU that does it, but the OS is where it originates.

2 - The applications that use both cores evenly are probably multithreaded applications. They are coded to make use of multiple cores.

Anything +- 5% is normal between two cores. Heck, +-10% is normal. 2% is very well balanced load in my eyes.
a b à CPUs
January 5, 2010 3:04:01 AM

i would consider such an evenly spread workload quite ABNORMAL tbh.

windows prioritses workloads, and generally tries to keep one core working more than another, so the other can downclock or go into standby. this is a power saving feature.

W7 is the ebst OS for this. as it will literally shut off cores when neccesary.
im guessing you are not using w7, which would be why the cores are running so closely.
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a b à CPUs
January 5, 2010 3:09:24 AM

welshmousepk said:
i would consider such an evenly spread workload quite ABNORMAL tbh.

It's not abnormal if the program is spawning more threads.
January 5, 2010 1:02:08 PM

randomizer said:
It's not abnormal if the program is spawning more threads.



I,m using W7 HP thanks for the dicussion, I have compared my cpu meter with the resource manager and its the same . How I came up with 2% is if core#2 is at 5% core #1 is at 7% and so-on.
!