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AMDTurion x64 - Identical Mobo Swap

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January 5, 2010 9:02:34 AM

Hey guys,

This forum has saved me a bunch of times, but now I finally need to post something.

The integrated graphics on my laptop went out, so I ordered a refurb mobo to swap out. I need to remove the CPU from my original mobo and put it in the new one. I've NEVER had to remove a CPU, and I've installed one only once NIB from a kit, so I need some guidance. I've looked around the boards, but couldn't find very many 'same CPU, new mobo' situations, and couldn't find any that were done on notebook computers, so I'm sorry if all of this is redundant.

It is a Turion x64 processor and a AMD Socket S1 in an HP dv9500. My questions are:

What cautions/considerations do I need to take considering that this is a CPU on a laptop motherboard where heat dissipation is a major issue?

How do I remove it? What can I expect in removing it? Are there instructions on removal for this socket type? How much "force" can i use without damaging the processor. I also need the heatsink, fan, etc to be moved to the new mobo.

How do in reinstall it on the new board? Does anything need to be cleaned and how would I do that? Do I need to buy thermal compound?

If someone is nice enough to explain all this more-or-less step by step, I'd be forever grateful.

I can just feel the n00b in my fingers as I type, so I apologize. Hopefully these are all routine answers. Any help is appreciated. Thanks!

Best solution

January 5, 2010 9:31:30 AM

If you're smart enough to work out how to dissasemble your laptop and remove its motherboard, I would have thought the final insignificant step of removing the processor would be the least of your concerns! It's just a case of finding a lever or latch or whatever it may be for an S1 socket, opening it, and gently lifting the processor out. Besides that...

1) Ground yourself (idealy with a wrist strap or whatever) but you should be doing this anyway while removing the motherboard

2) Be very carefull no to bend any pins (if the processor has them, rather than pads)

3) Once removed, wipe off any remaining thermal paste on the processor heat spreader (or die surface if no heat spreader) and clean off with IPA or some other solvent to remove any residue. Be carefull to avoid getting any contaminates on the pins of the processor while doing this


I could go on.. but am I answering the right question? is this what you mean?
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January 5, 2010 12:27:28 PM

From past experience the CPU's on laptops usually have a HSF that is secured with screws - which should be easy to find because the fan will vent directly out of the case.
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January 5, 2010 9:35:03 PM

Lord-Ilpolazzo said:
If you're smart enough to work out how to dissasemble your laptop and remove its motherboard, I would have thought the final insignificant step of removing the processor would be the least of your concerns! It's just a case of finding a lever or latch or whatever it may be for an S1 socket, opening it, and gently lifting the processor out. Besides that...

1) Ground yourself (idealy with a wrist strap or whatever) but you should be doing this anyway while removing the motherboard

2) Be very carefull no to bend any pins (if the processor has them, rather than pads)

3) Once removed, wipe off any remaining thermal paste on the processor heat spreader (or die surface if no heat spreader) and clean off with IPA or some other solvent to remove any residue. Be carefull to avoid getting any contaminates on the pins of the processor while doing this


I could go on.. but am I answering the right question? is this what you mean?



Yes, this answers my question, mostly. Will I need to buy thermal paste to reapply the heat spreader on the new mobo?
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a b à CPUs
January 6, 2010 2:23:24 AM

yes, its recommended fi you want to keep temps within safe levels.
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January 6, 2010 5:38:11 PM

jdhenshall said:
Yes, this answers my question, mostly. Will I need to buy thermal paste to reapply the heat spreader on the new mobo?


Yep, you will definitely need to get hold of some more thermal paste, anything will do really. One other thing that occurs to me is you may find when you take this thing appart that..

1) The heat sink assembly is probably shared between the CPU, the chipset and so on, so you will need to clean off any excess thermal paste on those and re-apply as required

2) Sometimes a thermal pad is used, this is a squishy silicone like pad which is used in place of thermal paste. Depending on the state of this, you may need to find a replacement pad if the old one looks particularly heat damaged and crusty. It may be possible to use thermal paste instead, but usually the pads seem to be used to fill irregular shapes or gaps so there is no alternative but to replace it with a suitable pad.

If I can offer any more advice just ask!
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January 14, 2010 6:54:35 PM

Alright I have some problems.

I revieced the new motherboard and I removed the processor sucessfully from the old, put it in the new mobo, put thermal paste where it was needed (some did use thermal pads, which I cleaned, and were in good shape) and put the whole laptop back together.

When I tried to power it on, the fan for the heatsink cam on, and a few LEDs came on, but noting else. So I tooke the WHOLE think apart again, and found out I didn't "seat" the processor: it was just sitting on the socket without being "clicked" in. So I seated it, attached everything put it back to gether, and now when I try to turn it on, I get no response. If I hold the computer up to my ear, I can hear a high pitched whining "electric" sound, but no LEDs or fans or nothing.

SO I tooked it apart again (3rd time) made sure the power was plugged in to the mobo, and the fans were plugged in to the mobo. I m pretty sure I put a good amount of paste on the cpu and gpu and anything that didn't have a thermal pad too. and tried again. Nothing.

Now, I'm trying to troubleshoot what would keep the computer from not booting up at all. At least the first time the fan came on.

this may seem stupid, but if the small li-ion backup watch battery were dead, would that prevent the computer from starting up? Please help!
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January 23, 2010 2:53:44 AM

Best answer selected by jdhenshall.
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