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Some liquid cooling questions than need answers

Last response: in Overclocking
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February 11, 2012 4:25:29 AM

I'm almost done modding my pc case & have some questions before I add a passive liquid cooler to my set up...

1) How effective is an anti-corrosion coolant in inhibiting galvanic corrosion?

I got a Reserator 1 passive liquid cooler that I'm going to add to my set up. I been looking for other alternatives such as large radiators that I'm going to add externally but such set up is very messy (3+3 fans on push & pull on a parallel connection) that I decided not to go with it. I really like the look of the Reserator 1. Besides the look it's also silent (being passive). I will not be using the pump inside the passive liquid cooler as I already have (2) pumps inside my pc case.

2) How extensive is the damage of copper in galvanic corrosion?

I got a copper CPU block (Swiftech Apogee HD) as well as a copper base radiators inside my pc case. From what I read, copper is resistant to corrosion at room temp but at heated temp not really sure how worst is the damage. What about aluminum? What's the damage?

3) Can aluminum components be used succesfully even with the risk of galvanic corrosion?

Reserator 1 is made of anodized aluminum. Anodized aluminum from what I read helps slow down corrosion. I'm not really worried of the Reserator 1 being corroded as it's easy to clean. The radiator corrosion is what makes me worried in the long run.

4) Is it necessary to run a single loop with my particular set up.

I'm running a dual loop, having a separate liquid flow going to CPU & that of the GPU. My CPU temps stays at 36 c if not gaming. In long gaming (game using a Frostbite 2 game engine) the hottest CPU temp I reach is about 50 c the most & it will drop back to 36 c about (probably less than 5 minutes) after gaming. The PU is overclocked to 4.8 GHz (core I7 2600K). Though a gentleman here at Toms once mentioned of my temp will be much better in a single loop, I see no point having a single loop when my CPU is really not that hot even when overclocked. My plan is to really cool the GPU (even though at present I have better temp also at 34 c if not gaming). The CPU being the one that really needs thermal control is the one I needed to have a better cooling set up. In few months my plan is to put (2) GTX 590 or better video cards.





a c 324 K Overclocking
February 11, 2012 3:33:05 PM

That was the same link I was going to add. :) 
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a c 78 K Overclocking
February 11, 2012 5:39:50 PM

oops sorry mate :whistle:  but if you scroll a lil lower to the last 3rd of the page - you'll notice one poster mention something about adding corrosion inhibitors...

* yeap - now i'm sure he owns the fatal1ty board :)  and he's from OCN as well !
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February 12, 2012 1:24:28 AM

I'm really not looking for links on answers to my questions. I read this article of Martin as well as Skinee's article on liquid coolant before. I'm looking for personal opinion & what's best to do if you have to use Aluminum in your system. I made it clear that I'm going to use mixed metals in my set up.

Mixed metals on liquid cooling had been done on some liquid cooling set ups & I need answers by people who experienced using it. Honest answers without going getting on impressing someone who asked questions as how knowledgeable they are on every subjects pertaining to liquid cooling. I've seen a lot of BS before that really did'nt jive with that I truly see as factual. Some giving answers on something that they don't even use as if they know more than the people that use it (Like what I read few days ago about someone asking questions re: hybrid liquid cooler. The one giving answers is the who one never use a hybrid & just pretend that he knows it all).
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a c 324 K Overclocking
February 12, 2012 2:40:36 AM

Automotive antifreeze, mix it 20-30%.

I'm going to offer up some advice- you are asking for answers, but refusing data that has been put together by some great guys. Martin and Skinnee aren't the only guys on the web that have looked into this- the guys at Swiftech have done a lot of research as well as many folks on different enthusiast WC forums. Some decent Google searching will turn up quite a bit of relevant data on this subject.

If you don't want links with info, and you historically don't like 'member opinions' (which you seem to want this time...usually you reject opinion) you might want to just do your testing on your own and find out what's best for you. I'd be quite interested to see what you discover with testing based on what you choose to with and what methods.

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a c 78 K Overclocking
February 12, 2012 3:07:11 AM

^ + 1 to rubix.

although this will be overlooked by cheaptrick - maybe rubix could have a look, http://www.overclockers.com/pc-water-coolant-chemistry-...

detailed on how to concoct your own coolant for your loop.

* to inform other people; the mod that i did on my H50 contains both aluminium and copper in it.

I have;

Swiftech MCR120-Res Heat Exchanger - copper
Second rad by corsairs H50 (slim) rad - alu
NB cooled by Fusion Block (all copper)
Pump and CPU plate - H50 - copper

using PC ICE clear performance fluid - that has corrosion inhibitors to prevent galvanic corrosion(mentioned on the back of bottle)

have been using it for a year - no troubles, no temp drops and the inspection on the barbs show no damage
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a c 324 K Overclocking
February 12, 2012 3:10:20 AM

I've had that linked in the WC sticky for quite a while.

:) 
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a c 78 K Overclocking
February 12, 2012 3:29:10 AM

woops again... :whistle:  you know rubix mate - the fear of that corrosion thingy is what made me decide on overhauling my current WC loop and going all out with the aquacomputer rad and having everything in copper.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
February 12, 2012 3:52:25 AM

All good watercooling gear is made from copper, brass or combinations of those in addition to nickel plating and even silver from time to time. You can still technically have corrosion occur with those metals even without aluminum, but its far less probable than if aluminum were also present.

Thermaltake, (some old) Koolance and Zalman were big offenders of aluminum rads and fittings in the past.

Koolance puts out some very good parts these days.
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February 12, 2012 4:01:27 AM

Lutfij said:
^ + 1 to rubix.

although this will be overlooked by cheaptrick - maybe rubix could have a look, http://www.overclockers.com/pc-water-coolant-chemistry-...

detailed on how to concoct your own coolant for your loop.

* to inform other people; the mod that i did on my H50 contains both aluminium and copper in it.

I have;

Swiftech MCR120-Res Heat Exchanger - copper
Second rad by corsairs H50 (slim) rad - alu
NB cooled by Fusion Block (all copper)
Pump and CPU plate - H50 - copper

using PC ICE clear performance fluid - that has corrosion inhibitors to prevent galvanic corrosion(mentioned on the back of bottle)

have been using it for a year - no troubles, no temp drops and the inspection on the barbs show no damage


I actually read that overclocker article yesterday while goggling something on galvanic corrosion. In the pictures, it show what looks like greenish deposits & not actually real damage on the copper tubing. In Martin's article, it looks like galvanic corrosion not only leave some deposits but corrosion damage.

I've read in another article that copper is very resilient to corrosion compared to aluminum. I'm encouraged of the fact that anodized aluminum is also very resilient to galvanic corrosion. Factor the use of anti-corrosion liquid coolant, the big question is... Is it possible to prevent damage from galvanic corrosion with regular check up of liquid cooling components?

I'm surprised by you mentioning H50 having a rad made up of aluminum. Corsair been investing a lot in passive liquid cooling & to think that the liquid cooling components that they've use is actually made up of aluminum sounds like even Corsair is downplaying the potential damage of galvanic corrosion. Even if the H50 was made by Asetek, Corsair should know that one of its rads is made of aluminum.
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February 12, 2012 4:13:14 AM

rubix_1011 said:
All good watercooling gear is made from copper, brass or combinations of those in addition to nickel plating and even silver from time to time. You can still technically have corrosion occur with those metals even without aluminum, but its far less probable than if aluminum were also present.


I agreed. I actually read about this too. Even some on the high performance CPU liquid cooling blocks contained aluminum (outside). This is mainly because using copper on entire block adds some extra cost as copper is more expensive.

Also other metals can cost galvanic corrosion & not just aluminum.

Aesthetics really matters to me on my current liquid cooling set up. I really like the modern look of the Reserator 1 plus I already got one so I might as well use it.
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Best solution

a c 324 K Overclocking
February 12, 2012 6:06:32 PM

You are correct- all metals used in modern watercooling components can corrode when used together, even when aluminum is omitted. The degree of this depends on how close the metals are in proximity to one another in the loop and the conductivity of the water in the loop. Changing out water often and/or using some inhibitor or glycol mixture would be a ideal way to prolong corrosion. If you are running aluminum of any sort in a loop, I'd strongly advise some sort of corrosion inhibitor mixture. Common automotive antifreeze is a simple way, or you can find some decent mixtures online. Swiftech Hydrx used to be some very good stuff- I used it for a couple years simply because I liked the ectoplasm look to it, but it does offer pretty good corrosion resistance.
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February 12, 2012 6:09:52 PM

Best answer selected by Cheaptrick.
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