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Liquid Cooling GPUs

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February 15, 2012 11:21:31 AM

I'm getting 2 ASUS ENGTX DCUII 560Ti 1Gb graphics cards soon and thinking of watercooling both of them. Yes I'm aware that the cooling system for the DCUII is already great. But I'm mainly doing this for aesthetics, though I'm pretty new to liquid cooling but the idea has always been in the back of my mind, I never really had the money or time to go buy liquid cooling :??:  . I also have a Thermaltake Chaser MK-1 Case, which should have more than enough space. May also upgrade my CPU to liquid cooling later in the future, but for now I think my NH-D14 is working wonders. Yes? No? Thoughts/Suggestions would be much appreciated :D 

More about : liquid cooling gpus

a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
February 15, 2012 12:01:54 PM

If you have the money, why not? Personally, I would get two of http://pcsdesign.ca/Products/index.php?main_page=produc... . Already watercooled but has a bit less performance though. Also, I don't believe that there are any watercooling blocks for the ASUS GTX 560 Ti because the PCB is unique.
February 15, 2012 12:12:16 PM

samuelspark said:
If you have the money, why not? Personally, I would get two of http://pcsdesign.ca/Products/index.php?main_page=produc... . Already watercooled but has a bit less performance though. Also, I don't believe that there are any watercooling blocks for the ASUS GTX 560 Ti because the PCB is unique.


I see, might explain why I haven't been able to find any blocks for them! Might just have to get 570s then, or maybe the ATI equivalent. I'll wait for more replies in the meantime though, just to see what everyone else has to say. Thanks :) 
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a b U Graphics card
a c 324 K Overclocking
February 15, 2012 12:35:13 PM

I just put my blocks on my 560 Ti's last night, but they are universals. Are you meaning an actual watercooling loop, or are you thinking there is a closed loop cooler (like Corsair/Asetek, etc) for these?

Trying to gauge actual intention.
February 15, 2012 12:41:54 PM

I think an actual watercooling loop, but it is possible to just be cooling my cards alone and not my CPU right? As I am planning to include my CPU for waterccooling sometime in the future rather than now. Also, are the universal blocks any different in terms of cooling performance compared to full blocks?
a b U Graphics card
a c 324 K Overclocking
February 15, 2012 1:39:36 PM

There is, but not much that most people would even recognize. Full cover blocks are a little less restrictive and cool maybe 1-2C better in best case scenario.

You can build a loop for GPUs and then add your CPU later if you wanted, that happens with many people. You said you are mainly doing it for aesthetic value, not necessarily for performance. I completely understand- watercooling isn't really necessary, but it's a great hobby.
February 15, 2012 1:46:04 PM

rubix_1011 said:
There is, but not much that most people would even recognize. Full cover blocks are a little less restrictive and cool maybe 1-2C better in best case scenario.

You can build a loop for GPUs and then add your CPU later if you wanted, that happens with many people. You said you are mainly doing it for aesthetic value, not necessarily for performance. I completely understand- watercooling isn't really necessary, but it's a great hobby.


Oh okay, thanks a lot! :)  Yeah mainly for aesthetic value, but as long as the performance is better than the DCUII, don't want to spend a lot of money just to get lower cooling performance :p  So there are absolutely no full blocks for the 560Ti? Because I find them a lot more aesthetically appealing :p  Thanks.
February 15, 2012 2:01:24 PM

If you don't have to buy this right away, it'll be worth waiting 2 weeks for the new graphics cards to be released. You'll save a few bucks from the price drop.
a b U Graphics card
a c 324 K Overclocking
February 15, 2012 2:10:12 PM

There are some, just make sure you confirm compatibility with your model, if possible:

http://www.frozencpu.com/cat/l3/g30/c311/s1396/list/p1/Liquid_Cooling-Water_Blocks_VGA_-_Card_-_nVidia-GTX_560_Water_Blocks-Page1.html

Some might be Ti compatible, some might not, but most appear to be. I never really looked because I planned to use my MCW60 blocks (6th different set of cards with these blocks, so far). Not bad for an initial ~$100 investment over 10-12 different cards. :) 
February 15, 2012 2:13:36 PM

stingstang said:
If you don't have to buy this right away, it'll be worth waiting 2 weeks for the new graphics cards to be released. You'll save a few bucks from the price drop.


Yeah, that's my plan :p  Wonder if the new ones are any worth buying though.
February 15, 2012 9:18:59 PM

rubix_1011 said:
There are some, just make sure you confirm compatibility with your model, if possible:

http://www.frozencpu.com/cat/l3/g30/c311/s1396/list/p1/Liquid_Cooling-Water_Blocks_VGA_-_Card_-_nVidia-GTX_560_Water_Blocks-Page1.html

Some might be Ti compatible, some might not, but most appear to be. I never really looked because I planned to use my MCW60 blocks (6th different set of cards with these blocks, so far). Not bad for an initial ~$100 investment over 10-12 different cards. :) 


Can't seem to be able to find any of those that would fit the model I'm buying, looks like samuelsparks was right about the PCB on the ASUS models being unique unfortunately :(  I'll probably have to go with the universal blocks seeing as how I don't/won't have enough money for the compatible models. Any recommendations on which one I should be buying?
February 15, 2012 9:47:43 PM

Let me get this straight: you're going to put conductive liquid inside your computer because it looks good?

Granted, the chances of a leak are small but have you really thought about it? On top of that, generic blocks are of greatly varying quality; a custom fit solution is more likely to be of better quality and materials.

I've been doing watercooling since I got dual P55/233's to run on a board only cleared for 166MHz (had to cool the VRMs, not the CPUs). I only resort to it now if I can't get the temperature and/or noise to acceptable levels with air. Installing an unnecessary watercooling system is just tempting fate if you ask me.
February 15, 2012 10:48:18 PM

Quote:
Let me get this straight: you're going to put conductive liquid inside your computer because it looks good?


I do not see a problem with that, I've spent a lot of money on stuff for my PC which is purely aesthetic value.
a b U Graphics card
February 15, 2012 10:57:36 PM

You could stick some hoses in the computer and it will look like it is watercooled >.>
February 16, 2012 2:57:34 AM

fb39ca4 said:
You could stick some hoses in the computer and it will look like it is watercooled >.>


It would help if you could post useful comments :p 

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a b U Graphics card
a c 324 K Overclocking
February 16, 2012 12:19:38 PM
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Look at the PCB right next to the PCI-e connector- if the card is nVidia reference, it will have the nVidia logo. If not, it's likely not reference and you'd need a universal block or a block designed for that non-reference board.
February 18, 2012 3:55:27 AM

Best answer selected by -Jackson.
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