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EVGA motherboards

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April 16, 2010 9:16:15 PM

I've been looking at a P55 motherboard for a build i'm doing this summer, and I have a question.

I've noticed that for any EVGA motherboard, the RAM compatibility is listed as DDR3 2000 - 2600. Basically, top of the line.

Here is the motherboard i'm looking at right now: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
(Notice the memory standard, 2600+)

Here is the same motherboard, but listed on EVGA's website: http://www.evga.com/products/moreinfo.asp?pn=132-LF-E65...
(The memory standard says Maximum of 16GB DDR3 2600+)


Here's my question. I know from reading that EVGA is a good manufacturer of boards, so i would really like to consider them for my build. But certainly their motherboards don't JUST support 2600+ memory, right? Am i missing something?

Thanks for any help, Trueno07

P.S: I'm looking for a board that's up too 190$, i WILl crossfire, i WILL over clock, and i don't really care (right now) about USB 3.0 or Sata6. Any quick recommendations? I currently have this one picked out:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

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a c 297 V Motherboard
April 16, 2010 9:39:10 PM

Hi.

1- You won't see any difference between 2000 or 2600 and 1600, because the CL of the 2000 and 2600 is CL9 or CL10 that is very very slow for DDR3, so, IMO buy a RAM and buy a RAM with that speed is a wasted of money.
2- The Gigabyte mobo of your 2nd link support Crossfire at x8 that is good, but when you use Crossfire on that mobo, you USB 3.0 is downgrade to USB 2.0
3- IMO the ASUS P7P55D-E Pro is the best options for you.
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a c 235 V Motherboard
April 16, 2010 9:40:07 PM

I would go with the Gigabyte board over the EVGA board. The EVGA will support RAM less than 2600, so that isn't an issue. The difference is you are getting better features on the Gigabyte for a little more money!

Edit: I second the ASUS P7P55D-E Pro motherboard for under $190!!
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April 16, 2010 9:56:25 PM

Thanks for the quick response guys. And i understand all that saint, i just meant will the board support 1333, 1600, etc :)  sorry for the miss-communication there.

Also, i'm a little.... Iffy about ASUS... It's irrational, i know. I've just never considered them a "good" manufacture until i started Mobo shopping and realized that you guys like their boards...

Also the reviews mentioned something about a loud whine... Should i be worried?
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a c 297 V Motherboard
April 16, 2010 10:01:59 PM

What reviews?, because like all mobos manufacturer not all the mobos that they build are very good.
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April 16, 2010 10:11:11 PM

Oh the reviews for the P7P55D-E that you mentioned.

Oh and you accidentally answered my question about the Gigabyte motherboard "stealing" bandwidth from the PCIE slot... So it get's downgraded from USB 3.0 to 2.0?
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a c 297 V Motherboard
April 16, 2010 10:16:43 PM

^Yeah, when you use Crossfire in that mobo, the USB 3.0 don't works as 3.0, is downgrade to USB 2.0 because the USB 3.0 share bandwidth with the 2nd PCI-E slot.

About the reviews, exist some goods and some bads, but IMO a mobo with five start >60% is a good option to consider.
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a c 216 V Motherboard
April 17, 2010 12:16:47 AM

Trueno07 said:
Oh the reviews for the P7P55D-E that you mentioned.

Oh and you accidentally answered my question about the Gigabyte motherboard "stealing" bandwidth from the PCIE slot... So it get's downgraded from USB 3.0 to 2.0?


P7P55D-E is the Bee's knees, cat's meow ... well dats what my grandpa wuda said :) 

The Gigglebyte board's USB3 and SATA II rate are cut to half speed.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/usb-3.0-performance...

Gigabyte’s P55A-UD4P cuts costs by using the processor’s PCIe 2.0 connections to host its high-bandwidth controllers. Two of the primary graphics card’s 16 PCIe lanes supply its USB 3.0 and SATA 6.0 Gb/s controllers, and Gigabyte disables six more lanes to make the upper slot an effective x8 interface. The USB 3.0 and SATA 6.0 Gb/s controllers revert to the chipset’s 2.5 GT/s lanes whenever two graphics cards are installed, to preserve the x8 transfers each graphics card needs for optimal CrossFire or SLI performance.

Thus, users with a single graphics card must sacrifice half of its peak bandwidth to enable 5.0 Gb transfers to the USB 3.0 and SATA 6.0 Gb/s controllers, while those with two cards must live with 2.5 Gb/s bandwidth limits on USB 3.0 and SATA 6.0 Gb/s controllers. Neither of these sacrifices is huge or even noticeable on most of today’s hardware, yet anyone trying to future-proof their system could be left cold.
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April 27, 2010 9:33:04 PM

Best answer selected by Trueno07.
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