Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

low native resolution?

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
Share
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 9, 2004 3:22:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Does anyone know of any companies that manufacture laptops with a low
native resolution LCD (for people with poor eyesight)?

Thanks,

-Mark

More about : low native resolution

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 9, 2004 10:26:32 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I guess "low" is relative, but my Toshiba A45-S150 has a 15" LCD with 1024 x
768 native resolution. Looks great to my 56-year-old eyes.


"Mark Leary" <mleary@economics.mit.edu> wrote in message
news:c4c5d192.0406091022.f6a92dd@posting.google.com...
> Does anyone know of any companies that manufacture laptops with a low
> native resolution LCD (for people with poor eyesight)?
>
> Thanks,
>
> -Mark
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2004 2:33:27 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

mleary@economics.mit.edu (Mark Leary) wrote in message news:<c4c5d192.0406091022.f6a92dd@posting.google.com>...
> Does anyone know of any companies that manufacture laptops with a low
> native resolution LCD (for people with poor eyesight)?
>
> Thanks,
>
> -Mark

It's fairly easy to change the rez in Windows XP for everything...
Start - Settings - Control Panel - Display Properties - Appearance -
Advanced, then flip through all the settings and bump up the font a
couple of points each. Then, save the theme. You can zoom in on
word. For web browsing, get a browser like Opera that has a zoom
feature & put it to 120 or 130% to make things easier to see.

What I'm saying is that you should get the best notebook to suit your
needs, then customise it so that it works the way you want it to.
*much* easier than buying a specialty product like what you're looking
for, if it even exists. I'd also suggest getting a notebook with a
larger screen (15"-17"), but they're a lot bulkier and heavier.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2004 10:38:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Mark Leary" <mleary@economics.mit.edu> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:c4c5d192.0406091022.f6a92dd@posting.google.com...
> Does anyone know of any companies that manufacture laptops with a low
> native resolution LCD (for people with poor eyesight)?

Take a 1600x1200 notebook and set it to 800x600

At a TFT, results at lower than native resultution are only
good, if the division is an integer number.


--
Roland Mösl
http://www.pege.org Clear targets for a confused civilization
http://web-design-suite.com Web Design starts at the search engine
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2004 6:04:36 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

In article <c4c5d192.0406091022.f6a92dd@posting.google.com>,
mleary@economics.mit.edu says...
> Does anyone know of any companies that manufacture laptops with a low
> native resolution LCD (for people with poor eyesight)?

Yeah, that's me since about 42. Most of the new designs have a
built-in "stretch" mode that can be enabled. I run my new Dell
(1024x768) at 800x600 all the time, and find it acceptable, though
it is not as crisp as native mode. It also does 640x480 if I get
really blind or want to run DOS or an old game. Can you say *big*
icons;) You typically don't find useful information like this in
the advertising. You might also consider something used, like a
Presario 1685 on eBay, for example. Very affordable, good blend
of technologies, support is up to you of course.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2004 6:04:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> > Does anyone know of any companies that manufacture
> > laptops with a low native resolution LCD (for people
> > with poor eyesight)?

> Yeah, that's me since about 42.

That's about the age where most people start to need reading glasses.

Is your vision actually uncorrectable, or are you just trying to get by
without glasses?

If your vision is uncorrectable, my apologies for asking. But I've seen *so*
many people who have hit their forties and squint and stare at their
computer screens instead of getting their vision corrected.

I used to have perfect vision at any distance. Now, without my glasses, I
can barely read anything at any resolution. With them, though, I can use a
15" 1600x1200 display all day with perfect clarity and comfort.

So if you haven't done it already, go see a good optometrist and get a pair
of single-vision lenses (not progressives or bifocals!), corrected for the
distance to your computer screen. Take your notebook with you, or measure
the distance before you go. It's probably about 20", which is a bit farther
out than a typical reading prescription.

If you're anything like me, you will wish you'd done it years ago. :-)

-Mike
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2004 7:02:29 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Michael Geary" <Mike@DeleteThis.Geary.com> wrote in message
news:10ch2ov6u18537a@corp.supernews.com...
> > > Does anyone know of any companies that manufacture
> > > laptops with a low native resolution LCD (for people
> > > with poor eyesight)?
>
> > Yeah, that's me since about 42.
>
> That's about the age where most people start to need reading glasses.
>
> Is your vision actually uncorrectable, or are you just trying to get by
> without glasses?
>
> If your vision is uncorrectable, my apologies for asking. But I've seen
*so*
> many people who have hit their forties and squint and stare at their
> computer screens instead of getting their vision corrected.
>
> I used to have perfect vision at any distance. Now, without my glasses, I
> can barely read anything at any resolution. With them, though, I can use a
> 15" 1600x1200 display all day with perfect clarity and comfort.
>
> So if you haven't done it already, go see a good optometrist and get a
pair
> of single-vision lenses (not progressives or bifocals!), corrected for the
> distance to your computer screen. Take your notebook with you, or measure
> the distance before you go. It's probably about 20", which is a bit
farther
> out than a typical reading prescription.
>
> If you're anything like me, you will wish you'd done it years ago. :-)
>
> -Mike
>
>
Hey, I resemble that remark! ...But, the hassle of finding those glasses is
a pain. Yes, I know that I can get bi-foculs. Wearing glasses all the time
is also a pain. No, what I want is stuff printed in larger print. That
includes the screen of my laptop.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 11, 2004 3:25:06 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

That is the wrong solution to the problem. The "Accessibility" features
of Windows allow you to configure very large fonts and icons on a high
resolution screen. Also, you might want to investigate the "magnifier"
(one of the Windows Accessibility tools, you already have it). It's
possible that the accessibility features were not installed with your
copy of Windows, but they can be added from Control Panel / Add-Remove
software, Windows Components.


Mark Leary wrote:

> Does anyone know of any companies that manufacture laptops with a low
> native resolution LCD (for people with poor eyesight)?
>
> Thanks,
>
> -Mark
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 11, 2004 3:28:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Re: "It's fairly easy to change the rez in Windows XP ...."

It's easy, but on an LCD display, you don't ever want to do this. LCD
displays should always be run at their native resolution.

The original poster's objective was not to change the resolution, it was
to make things bigger. Those are two totally different things. His
thinking on this is wrong, he needs to forget about resolution and
understand that his real issue is with the size of displayed text and
icons. His original thinking is kind of like someone going into a bank
to change all of their money into pennies so that they will "have more
money".

The size of objects (both text and icons) in Windows can be changed
while keeping the resolution constant. And the "Windows Accessibility
Tools" includes specific features for people with a number of types of
impairment (including poor vision). Changing the resolution may be
viable on a CRT display, but it should never be done on an LCD display,
where it should be kept equal to the LCD panel physical resolution.


Txiasaeia wrote:

> mleary@economics.mit.edu (Mark Leary) wrote in message news:<c4c5d192.0406091022.f6a92dd@posting.google.com>...
>
>>Does anyone know of any companies that manufacture laptops with a low
>>native resolution LCD (for people with poor eyesight)?
>>
>>Thanks,
>>
>>-Mark
>
>
> It's fairly easy to change the rez in Windows XP for everything...
> Start - Settings - Control Panel - Display Properties - Appearance -
> Advanced, then flip through all the settings and bump up the font a
> couple of points each. Then, save the theme. You can zoom in on
> word. For web browsing, get a browser like Opera that has a zoom
> feature & put it to 120 or 130% to make things easier to see.
>
> What I'm saying is that you should get the best notebook to suit your
> needs, then customise it so that it works the way you want it to.
> *much* easier than buying a specialty product like what you're looking
> for, if it even exists. I'd also suggest getting a notebook with a
> larger screen (15"-17"), but they're a lot bulkier and heavier.
!