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Any body have accomplished Asrock Z68 Extreme 4 (Gen3) & 2600K @ 5GHz

Last response: in Overclocking
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February 20, 2012 6:44:16 AM

My system is:

M/B: Asrock Z68 Extreme 4 (Gen3)
CPU: 2600K
RAM: G.Skill [ RipjawsX ] F3-12800CL10Q-32GBXL
PSU: Corsair TX 650W V2

I have the system running at 4.5GHz (1.35 Vcore, 50 x 100 BLCK) with 71' degree celsius and passed high testing of intelburntest,

I would to go 5 GHz but can't get it yet, any body have accomplished this, could you please share you setting?
a b K Overclocking
February 20, 2012 7:14:13 AM

71C is too high for a 2600K anyway (imo)

You could try turning off HT and checking your temps then.

My 2500k doesn't go over 55C @ 4.6Ghz 1.35v

There isn't any noticeable performance increase after 4.5/4.6Ghz anyway.
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a b K Overclocking
February 20, 2012 7:27:37 AM

what cooler?
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a c 106 K Overclocking
February 20, 2012 7:30:53 AM

^ What Deadjon said.

You want your temps in the low 70s max, but even more importantly you do not want to go over 1.4v and really 1.36 or so if you want your chip to last.

When you start approaching 1.4v the chip starts to degrade due to a process called electromigration. You can reduce the life of the chip to a matter of months. 1.4v requires a custom water cooling loop to do safely.

My 2600K does 4.5Ghz at 1.32v with Hyperthreading on. Temps idle in the high 20s to low 30s and max in the upper 60s low 70s when running Prime 95.

Every chip is different. The max overclock is due in part to the motherboard of course but is mostly due to the chip itself. Not every 2500K/2600K can hit 5Ghz, hell not every chip will do 4.5Ghz. Some unlucky people even have chips that max in the 4.1-4.2Ghz range.

Deadjon is correct in that there is very little to gain by going over 4.5Ghz anyway. That seems to be the sweet spot for these chips.
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a c 106 K Overclocking
February 20, 2012 7:33:38 AM

deadjon said:
71C is too high for a 2600K anyway (imo)

You could try turning off HT and checking your temps then.

My 2500k doesn't go over 55C @ 4.6Ghz 1.35v

There isn't any noticeable performance increase after 4.5/4.6Ghz anyway.



That Phanteks is pretty amazing.
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a b K Overclocking
February 20, 2012 7:39:07 AM

^big too!
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February 20, 2012 8:49:23 AM

I'm using Thermaltake Frio OCK, so I also have HT enable due to this PC will be used as a virtualization server and will running 24/7.

Any suggestion to make this PC to be available at 24/7 are welcome then, I'm a newbie in overclocking.



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a b K Overclocking
February 20, 2012 9:27:26 AM

for a newbie 5Ghz isn't a good target.i am also a noob and i achieved 4ghz.
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February 20, 2012 11:50:09 AM

Overclocking newbies don't regularly check their temperatures, and may have voltage spikes to which will degrade the CPU much faster. For this, you would have to keep the voltage as low as 1.325V, and save yourself some money in the longer run. Their are minimal to no performance increase in 0.1Ghz intervals over 4Ghz. Servers running 24/7 will need to be efficient, though not too powerful, increasing lifetime of the chip. Though, you are given a three year warranty on pretty much all Intel Sandy-bridge CPU's, so if that's what your aiming for, go ahead.
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a c 106 K Overclocking
February 20, 2012 3:37:35 PM

Unrecognised said:
Overclocking newbies don't regularly check their temperatures, and may have voltage spikes to which will degrade the CPU much faster. For this, you would have to keep the voltage as low as 1.325V, and save yourself some money in the longer run. Their are minimal to no performance increase in 0.1Ghz intervals over 4Ghz. Servers running 24/7 will need to be efficient, though not too powerful, increasing lifetime of the chip. Though, you are given a three year warranty on pretty much all Intel Sandy-bridge CPU's, so if that's what your aiming for, go ahead.



This post is basically nonsense. People new to overclocking don't check temps and have voltage spikes??!! Voltage spikes?? lol Because the computer knows when someone is new to overclocking and just lies there waiting to spike some voltage. :sarcastic: 

There are no gains going over 4Ghz?? Yes, there are. There are even gains in some things going to 5Ghz but they are too small to risk a CPU for.

Servers don't need to be too powerful? And by chance have you ever even seen a server? Because I have never seen 16 core desktop CPUs yet but servers have them.

All Intel CPUs have a 3 year warranty not "pretty much all Sandy Bridge CPUs". And no that warranty does not cover overclocking. They sell a special warranty for that.

http://click.intel.com/tuningplan/


If you have no idea what you are talking about don't post.
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a c 106 K Overclocking
February 20, 2012 3:50:57 PM

sengkaew said:
I'm using Thermaltake Frio OCK, so I also have HT enable due to this PC will be used as a virtualization server and will running 24/7.

Any suggestion to make this PC to be available at 24/7 are welcome then, I'm a newbie in overclocking.



As long as you keep the voltage under 1.36v and the temps in the 60s C max day to day your chip should last years.

Your day to day temps will never go as high as when stressing with Prime 95. So if you hit the low 70s when stressing you should be fine for day to day use. My 2600K as I said above hits the upper 60s lower 70s after a few hours of Prime 95 and I do not go over the upper 50s - low 60s in real world use.

The Frio is a very good cooler. See if you can drop the voltage to 1.32v at 4.5Ghz and your temps will come down a bit. If not I think you are fine at 4.5Ghz.

Make sure you leave the RAM at 1.5v.

Check out the extra overclockers insurance. It basically gives you one "no questions asked" replacement CPU if you do fry yours overclocking it. The insurance is only an extra $25 for a 2600K for 3 years. This is in addition to the normal warranty. The normal warranty does not cover overclocking though.

http://click.intel.com/tuningplan/
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